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Discussion Starter #1
My driver side Xeon bulb is starting to turn purple and admit less light, I'm assuming the bulb is burning out. Since I do need this fixed ASAP before it burns out on me ill probally take it to the dealer, any idea on how much they would charge
Thanks
 

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Probably between $500 and $$800. US
 

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Yes and no. My dealer seems to beat internet prices on parts without me even asking. Doesn't seem like many here have had the same experience though. I'd guess $200+.
 

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Yes, your bulb is going...you should replace both at the same time or your colors will vary right/left or be prepared to do the other one soon. Its easy to do yourself and there are threads in the forum on this. Some have had + results sourcing the D2S on fleabay cheaper, but the bulb is not cheap ~$100+.

http://www.roverparts.com/nxt/?keywords=xenon+bulbs
 

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Its a diff between a parabolic vs ellipsoid bulb. Good to know we have 1 efficient part in the RRS

Interesting question of the diff - had to google that - I think its to do with the reflection and how wide the beam is. Parabolic is wider and Ellipsoid is narrower. From another site "Parabolics, esp. freeform parabolics are better for halogens because they are more efficient (so more light) but with HID you don't need to worry much about that because they're so bright and the much more important thing is accuracy of the beam pattern which is much easier to do with ellipsoids."

From
http://www.iatse611.org/education/Electrics2.htm

The ellipsoidal reflector is more efficient than either the spherical or parabolic. By mathematical definition an Ellipsoid has two focal points. When a reflector is placed at the focal point at that end, all rays of the light that strike the reflector will be diverted through the second focal point. The result is that an enormous percentage of the light from the source is directed in a manner that makes it easily usable. Ellipsoidal reflectors are used in Ellipsoidal instruments and can improve the efficiency of an instrument by 75%.

If a light source is placed in the focal point of a parabolic reflector, the rays of light will be reflected parallel to one another. This will give a great concentration of light in a tight beam, rather than an effused spread. Moving the source toward the reflector will spread the light, while moving the source away from the reflector will cause the light rays to converge. This type of reflector can be found in some floodlights, beam projectors, scoops and PAR lamps.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Its a diff between a parabolic vs ellipsoid bulb. Good to know we have 1 efficient part in the RRS

Interesting question of the diff - had to google that - I think its to do with the reflection and how wide the beam is. Parabolic is wider and Ellipsoid is narrower. From another site "Parabolics, esp. freeform parabolics are better for halogens because they are more efficient (so more light) but with HID you don't need to worry much about that because they're so bright and the much more important thing is accuracy of the beam pattern which is much easier to do with ellipsoids."

From
http://www.iatse611.org/education/Electrics2.htm

The ellipsoidal reflector is more efficient than either the spherical or parabolic. By mathematical definition an Ellipsoid has two focal points. When a reflector is placed at the focal point at that end, all rays of the light that strike the reflector will be diverted through the second focal point. The result is that an enormous percentage of the light from the source is directed in a manner that makes it easily usable. Ellipsoidal reflectors are used in Ellipsoidal instruments and can improve the efficiency of an instrument by 75%.

If a light source is placed in the focal point of a parabolic reflector, the rays of light will be reflected parallel to one another. This will give a great concentration of light in a tight beam, rather than an effused spread. Moving the source toward the reflector will spread the light, while moving the source away from the reflector will cause the light rays to converge. This type of reflector can be found in some floodlights, beam projectors, scoops and PAR lamps.
Interesting stuff, anyone know what the RRS comes stock with?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Also how would I go about changing the bulb, I opend the hood and had a tough time tryin to get behind the headlight since there isn't any room
 
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