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Discussion Starter #1
So I was recently paying attention to my brakes... I noticed something about big brakes (brembos and others)... There is normally a fixed fluid line connecting both sides of brembos calipers. Presumably this is the vessel that engages the outer brake pad...Right? This is how it looks on almost all other cars ive seen...

(this line is illustrated in gray)

Again, look at this caliper of a Mitsubishi Lancer Evo...

It's got a connecting line.

I looked at my brakes and that line is not present! There is definetly a duct to connect that line.. but its just not there.

I freaked out a bit, being that my car had just been at the dealer for service... but I looked at a few other S/C'ed 06-09 Rovers... lo and behold they didn't have them either!!! Here is a photo borrowed from another thread (hope the owner doesn't mind) that shows a painted OEM caliper on aftermarket but still stock size rotors, missing that line too... The only thing we (I, like in this photo) have is the cap on one end... the other entry is just left alone...



The only thing I can think of is that they internalized the connection between the two piston banks within the caliper... Otherwise were only using half of our brakes...? Anyone knows what gives? SC people please advise if you've got them...?
 

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Miami,

Not sure what the deal is but iirc my porsche doesn't have those lines either... I will double check in the AM and get back to you. Great observation!
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Those crazy Italians... 8~

The hydraulic fluid line in the RRS caliper is internal vs. external. I dunno if one way is better than the other. You can see it done both ways on the fixed calipers--btw the RRS/SC has fixed (aluminum) calipers, the RRS HSE has floating (iron) calipers. The Wilwood website has lots of different configurations you can look at http://www.wilwood.com/Calipers/CaliperListLanding.aspx. Although if you think about it, you want that fluid to stay cool, so I guess whatever way keeps it cooler is probably better.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
An internalized fluid circuit makes sense I guess. I guess they just wanted to cost cut in the design and left the vestiges of the old fluid line ports. Now why would they cap only one end though?
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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MIAMIRRS said:
Now why would they cap only one end though?
[youtube:33g6yr4z]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XYVmrJFxL78&feature=related[/youtube:33g6yr4z]

`)
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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j/k. You mean the bleeder screw? You always bleed from the highest point so you don't introduce air... hence the caliper is always mounted bleeder up. So unless you are making a generic a/m caliper body that can be mounted either axle aft or axle front, you only need one bleeder screw.

Capisce?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ah makes sense... It seems many cars with OEM Brembo fixed calipers come with internal fluid channels.

Thanks for indulging my curiosity.
 
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