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So is there a center diff and a VC? Personally I dont have and dont like the VC solution and prefer the locking center diff.

My understanding of the system however is that there is a VC and no center diff. So gearbox - tranfer case leads to the main output shaft with at the back the handbrake and rear propshaft but at the front the same shaft connects to the VC which then connects to the front prop shaft.

Basically like a Series transfer case but instead of the dog clutch you have this VC thing.

Meaning that when you jack up one front wheel it will turn only because the VC allows slip.

Maybe I understood that wrong.
 

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Yes, as diagram in link. The step change of original Range Rover was a 3 differential setup giving full time permanent 4 wheel drive. As opposed to the series vehicles with axle differentials and just a plain dog engagement of front shaft when requested.

The centre diff on any vehicle doesn't cycle much so not much loss if you constrict it. It just accommodates the difference in speed from the front and rear axles prescribing unequal radius during turning.

If you rotate a front wheel to test you'll see how easy it accommodates slow speed differences. It doesn't offer much resistance unless you try to speed it up.

One area it offers most advancement is situations when you get tarmac, snow and ice in variable patches. Put that on a significant gradient and you don't have to choose where and when to use locker. It'll also always avoid transmission windup. This is particularly useful in alpine winter environment.

It'll go to full locking the same as a mechanical unit, although this is an area people are unwilling to accept and sight it as a disadvantage. That's not true, it'll do everything the other type will under load.
You'd need to loose traction of a wheel on both axles to prevent drive as an open centre diff will loose all traction with one wheel free and can halt the vehicle.

It works well on braking too. In severe environment it'll get one axle keeping the other rotating through the VC. All this without the knowledge and experience of the driver taken into consideration.

I think they work really well in anything I've put it through.
 

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Yes I get it now. I thought it was similar to the Freelander (1) setup, but in fact it is much more sophisticated.

My Series 3 has the dog clutch. My RRC (84) has the center difflock and my LR3 has clutch style 'electronic' difflocks. All works but each has it's own pro's and con's.
 
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