RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
OK, my first post was to ask about OBD2 units so having bought one and with the rain and wind having gone (the car is not under cover!) I have now used it. But before going into the codes let me explain the situation ...

I bravely bought a 2005 very nice looking 4.2 supercharged L322 as a non-runner for what I think was a good price. Yes, I am a risk taker! :) I took a view that it would probably be a sensor or two or coils. The engine turns over and 'tries' to start as if only a few cylinders are firing but will not pick up. The last time I tried I stopped when it let out a large backfire through the intakes, I decided more of that would not do anything any good. :)

I linked up the OBD2 reader with my phone and it returned the following ...

284754


I think my first requirement is to get the engine running because if that's a no-no then so is the rest of the car. So my question is ...

I wonder if I delete all codes (obviously I have a note of them) and then try and start the engine will the relevant 'non-starting' codes be recreated representing why it will not start? Or should I just plug on with the codes found?

From readings on the Internet it seems that almost any code can cause another to throw a fault in which case is there a particular order to deal with the faults? For example, I read that the U0300 fault can be caused by any sensor being at fault and throwing a dodgy reading to the ECM or U0403 can be caused by a slight drop in battery voltage and I mean slight, there are some reports of less than 12.6 volts causing this fault code to fire. The battery probably dropped well below that while repeatedly attempting to start the engine.

Some guidance on how to proceed would be very welcome.
 

·
Registered
2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
302 Posts
Have you performed a full compression test to ensure the motor/vehicle is in the least bit worth throwing money at?

If so, what were your results.

If not, do a compression test before spending time chasing an expensive rabbit trail.

Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Hi Rob, no I haven't done a compression test yet but I have worked on many cars and appreciate the need for one eventually but I just want to get an idea how to deal with codes. I'm assuming there could be known frequent problems that cost nothing or little such as cleaning the MAF in response to the P0102 and P0113 codes and then checking that the MAF is working correctly is one I picked up from the Internet today .
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top