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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi

Does anyone have any info about the sorts of engine temps are likely to lead to gasket failure? Mine operates at 90*C / 192F but the heat tabs say on my replacement engine that it has reached 110*C/ 230F. Gaskets failed. I have not seen this on my OBD software or my temp gauge. Like most RR owners I watch the temp gauge carefully and would respond if I thought the engine was overheating. Also, are heat temperature tabs accurate.

AF

RR4.0SE Auto Gas Converted. Owned 10 years and well maintained.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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http://www.commercialforms.com/Detail.bok?no=236

Heat Tabs - 3 Hole Engine Style

SKU: IS10HT

Heat Tabs - 3 Hole Engine Style
Protect engines & cylinder head against warranty claims. Heat Tabs, when attached to the engine block or heads provide visual evidence that an engine has been overheated. 100 tabs & one tube of installation adhesive.

PRICE: $29.35
BUY
 

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Where did they mount the device?

If it was external to the motor it won't read the same as water temperature.

Adding antifreeze to water raises the boiling point to well over 100C at 1 bar (15 pounds) and the 1.4 bar system pressure in the RR would raise the boiling point to near 110 C with just plain water.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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4,635 Posts
TheHistoryMan said:
Hi

Does anyone have any info about the sorts of engine temps are likely to lead to gasket failure? Mine operates at 90*C / 192F but the heat tabs say on my replacement engine that it has reached 110*C/ 230F. Gaskets failed. I have not seen this on my OBD software or my temp gauge. Like most RR owners I watch the temp gauge carefully and would respond if I thought the engine was overheating. Also, are heat temperature tabs accurate.

AF

RR4.0SE Auto Gas Converted. Owned 10 years and well maintained.
Your engine is likely to be running much higher than 90C, more like 96C, and as you run LPG, the stress with temperature and the cooling system is even higher than just petrol.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #8
The heat tabs are self adhesive labels which are stuck to the core plugs with some form of temp sensitive paint which changes colour at different temps. Mine had changes to show110C but not the 121C highest temp shown. There was no other evidence of this.

The key thing is that is a momentary rise to 110C enough to warp the heads causing gasket failure. I can't seem to find any evidence for this.

And, how accurate can the sticky labels be.

The History Man
 

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I don't think it's the heat, aluminum can take a good bit of heat (less than steel) before it deforms. I think it's the pressure, as the coolant heats up, the pressure rises, the pressure will blow out a weak-spot in the gasket. THEN the trouble starts, coolant goes away through the hole, remaining coolant boils off, & keeps the pressure up until all the water is gone, then the engine heat has no where to go but into the block/heads THEN you get a warped head from the heat/uneven cooling after the engine is shut off

I've never seen the temp-tabs for engines, but heard of similar things for industrial use, makes sense the technology would transfer..
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #10
This is the strange thing - there has been no major water loss. At most, 1/4 litre or 1/2pint per 1000 miles. The gasket lifted to allow exhaust gas to escape but little else.

Tha History Man
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Mine has an internal leak at the moment, probably has done for the last 12 months+. The car should not need topping up at all though. That's the theory.
 

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all depends on where the weak spot is....it can go water out, water in (to the cylinder) which would be exhaust in (to water) as well or exhaust out....

if you have to top it up, there's a leak, which will eventually get worse...
 

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shupack said:
if you have to top it up, there's a leak, which will eventually get worse...
Perfectly phrased as always. In the year since my radiator replacement I have only topped off about 2 or 3 cups worth over well over 30K miles. I also know that I had a tiny seepage at the top of the waterpump gasket. I only ever saw it after long highway drives. Again, if you have a leak... of any kind, you better start looking.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #14
The leak at the top of the water pump is likely to be the top long bolt - onw of the two larger bolts which goes into the water jacket. PTFE tape works wonders a tip from an engine builder in the US.

My leak was from a poorly fitting pipe fitted into the heater circuit to supply the gas vapouriser. And... it would only leak as it was cooling down after a long run. T piece replaced and problem solved. Although I feel that all leaks are ultimately down to a higher than normal presure in the system. Watch out!

No one seems to know what temp could be decribed as a overheat. I feel like I am driving a time bomb as no matter what you do the car will have a head gasket failure. Maybe massive amounts of water wetter is the answer.

The History Man
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hey get this.

It seems all my leak issues are down to a cracked gasket ring - the bit of the gasket which circles the bore which my engine builder say was due to a overheat issue. Has anyone else out there had this and could it be due to a 110C max heat.

I believe I am being told bulls dangly bits as they do not want to accept responsibility for a failed component. How would some of you mechanics out there respond to this if this situation was presented to you?

TheHistoryMan
Hopefully fixed 4.0SE which goes like stink when running properly.

PS If you have rough idle check the right bank exhaust manifold. Quite a poor design really. This is prone to cracking and some poor welding. Seal it up by using a good tig welder and you will be amazed by the difference it makes to running an how easily the engine revs. The best £20 I have spent on the vehicle.
 

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G'day ,it could be from low coolent in system if not checked daily for a month or so if not purged properly especially if fitted with LPG.
Cheap head gaskets and crappy bolt sets. :naughty:
 

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With the proper coolant mix 110 C is well within the operating temperature range. The coolant /water mix at 1.4 bar pressure will not boil until temperatures above that. Ordinary Prestone at 50/50 doesn't boil until 149 C at 1 bar.

So if the "water" temperature of 110 C is all that they have for mistreatment they really don't have much of a case.
 
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