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Discussion Starter #1
It is all in the title. The RR is in very good condition, other than the fact that the timing chain ate the guides for lunch. Im in Maryland if that matters. I have a feeling it is worthless. 160k miles.
 

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most likely nothing. at 160K and needing rebuild I doubt anyone would touch it
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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I'd happily take it off your hands but you wouldn't send it by mail I guess?

Seriously, proffesionals will be interested. Somebody might have na accidented one and swap engines. Here you would get about 7000 USD for it with a bad engine.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I would say if the block is good, just the chains/guides are bad, maybe $2-2.5k if the rest is well sorted and tires are solid.

If the block is toast, it is new engine time and then $1-1.5k.

To be honest, if it is just the chains, for about $1k in parts one can get everything that needs to be replaced - replaced. It is all there, and taking off the intake makes even the valley pan an added 15 minutes. It can be done in a weekend.

If I were looking, I would look at the overall condition, the tires and the block. The rest doesn't really worry me.

I would either pull the engine and do the torque converter and RMS, plus all the other items (maybe even the valve stem guides - leaving head on) or leave the engine in and do the timing guides, engine oil pan, hoses, intake/pcv, valley pan, pulleys and belts, water pump/thermostat, valve cover gaskets, vanos, and all related seals. Everything is coming off - may as well do it.

The thing that scares me on yours is whether the guides are the only issue, or did the block get toasted. It has been about 50/50 on the posts I have been reading. If the guides were left broken for too long that is not good.
 

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Mine chewed the timing chains at 230k miles for the first time , i t cost me less that 1 k to fix and it its still a great car... daily driver, runs great and currently looking better than ever 245k miles and runs like a new engine..... its a 2005 btw... it all comes down to how you look after/value it personally.My car is great, would give it up for anything...
 

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Well, did valves hit cylinders ? I assume they did. .
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I recently passed on one with similar mileage and very same issue because the body was in a bad shape. The seller was asking $1k, was willing to let it go for $600. I'd personally pick up a clean example with a blown engine for the asking price, but it'd have to be local.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Had those guides replaced on My Lovely Bride's 2004 a year ago. Was right @ 105k.
Not hateful as far as cost to have the repair done by my guy in Glen Burnie.

(Bruthaman, I'm a native A.A.CO guy here myself.)
 

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I'm very close to you in MD and also a 2004 RR HSE owner. Depending on the condition, I might be interested. Do you have pictures?
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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You might notice that Rover 2 in my signature block is Mike's (OP) Rover in this thread. My wife and I met him, he is a really nice guy, and bought the Rover and we have been giving it all the TLC it needs. While the guides were not broken as they had been replaced sometime during the car's history, there were pieces of guide scattered throughout the lower part of the engine and the previous tech that changed them used way too much RTV which amazingly did not clog the oil pickup tube or get in any of the oil passages. While the guides had life left in them, the engine did need to be taken apart to address other issues, so we ripped the entire front end apart and just replaced everything. The issue was a seized alternator bearing and completely seized primary and secondary belt tensioners. There was also a broken PCV oil drain hose and serious oil leaks. The Bank 1 Vanos non-return valve was stuck, and the B1 Vanos transmission had a cracked plastic ring and was spurting oil through the front. The timing chain tensioner was the old style and not proving sufficient tension either. The A/C compressor had zero oil left in the system. We also swapped the steering wheel and airbag for good units, the steering wheel got the silver inserts and heated functionality, and we repainted some of the interior foundry finish to gloss black. We also lubricated the internal HVAC fan and changed the fascia to gloss black. The transfer case motor was rebuilt too and is working now. We're very proud of our result as DIYers and we spared no expense and scrutinized every detail.

I'm posting this to serve as an inspiration to others that you too can save a Rover. Maybe I'll start a non-profit called Save The Rovers, because I have a weakness in my heart for these cars, especially the early model L322s and 2004 is my favorite year. Very few shops would put the detail into this like we did, with replacing every fastener, stripping and properly painting engine parts and pulleys and customizing specific hoses for ease of future service. We reckon all the work and custom approach would probably have cost $10k from a shop, yet we spent about $3k in parts.

Here's some pics of the rebuild. We replaced every gasket and seal (except head gasket), flushed/backflushed fuel injectors and replaced filters and seals, replaced all hoses and vacuum hoses, replaced ALL engine accessories, replaced all A/C seals and desicant, vacuumed and refilled, did the full timing chain and tensioner replacement with new Genuine BMW parts, painted upper timing case covers and valve covers, all new spark plugs and ignition coils, extensive cleaning and tons more. We used the German Auto Solutions timing kit which was awesome. We also replaced many standard torx fasteners with yellow chromate zinc-plated hex bolts of the same if not better tensile strength, used silicone vacuum hoses to replace nearly everything, and replace all other major hoses in the car. We redid every A/C seal and other gasket. The car runs and every major feature works. We also did the valley pan, rear coolant crossover pipe gaskets (we also modified the rear coolant crossover pipe with the BMW drain plugs and gaskets by threading holes in the ports, for possible future use), and installed a German Auto Solutions lower pressuer coolant cap. The power steering pump, hose and reservoir were changed along with the coolant reservoir and water pump.

We're only working through one problem with the Vanos shutting down during idle due to a P0011 and P0012 code, which we assess is due simply to upper timing covers not being seated down all the way. We have double and triple checked the timing and it's spot on. Waiting on the BMW tool to seat those down properly and we'll be putting new impulse wheels in and retiming it again. At 2,000rpm the engine is buttery smooth. Should be daily driveable soon and then my wife and I plan on doing a 2,000 mile trip to GA and SC in August. Later this year we plan on going to Assateague Island for a weekend trip with another friend of ours who has a 2012 L322 Autobiography. Lots of life left in this Rover.

2004 Range Rover HSE 4.4 M62 Removing the Intake Manifold by M J R, on Flickr


2004 Range Rover HSE L322 M62 Crank and Cams Locked at TDC. All Timing and Vanos Gears Removed. Vanos units will be re-sealed. Non-Return Valves replaced, and New Solenoids will be fitting. by M J R, on Flickr

And here's a few pics of the after (and we're not done yet):


2004 Range Rover M62 HSE 4.4L V8 Redone Engine by M J R, on Flickr


2004 Range Rover M62 HSE 4.4L V8 All new Timing Chain components by M J R, on Flickr


2004 Range Rover M62 HSE 4.4L V8 Fuel Vapor Solenoid with Silicone Hose Repair Splice by M J R, on Flickr


2004 Range Rover M62 HSE 4.4L V8 Primary ABDS Installed by M J R, on Flickr


2004 Range Rover M62 HSE 4.4L V8 Crankshaft Pulley (Painted with new fasteners) by M J R, on Flickr


2004 Range Rover M62 HSE 4.4L V8 New Primary and Secondary Timing Chains Installed with New Guides and Tensioners by M J R, on Flickr
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Your last post sure brings back memories of reviving my 2005 L322 find 2 years ago for 1500.00. It had a hole in both sides of the block - It was a catastrophic failure to say the least. I luckily found a low mile donor with failed guides - i took a gamble and won - the cylinders walls were perfect. The list is long on what i have replaced, but like what you said -its more of a hobby, labor of love. Because of this forum and the GAP team it would have taken longer - so i cant say enough for this group of folks that still like to get their hands dirty and the awesome technical support from Patrick @ GAP. Im still working a couple bugs here and there - time allowing. I wasn't sure about what i was getting into - but it sure paid off.
 
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