RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
355 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just curious..

There are members from all sorts of different countries here, now I was wondering how it all goes in your country..

I'm from The Netherlands, 9 years ago I immigrated to Australie/Tasmania.

In the Netherlands you pay tax for your car regarding the weight of it. You can pay monthly, per 3 months or per year. a car what weighs about 800 kg costs about 250 euros per year, a car weighing 2 tonnes costs about 1580 euros per year
A car what weighs about 1300/1400kg is affordable on a "average" income. A Land Rover you can't afford on an "average" income in The Netherlands.

When you drive on Diesel or LPG you have to pay a hell of a lot more, but the fuel is quite a bit cheaper. 2720 euros per year for a Land Rover on diesel.
Insurance is mandatory in The Netherlands, and pays for all the costs when you cause an accident.


In Tasmania you pay Registration, here there is a difference in amount regarding the amount of cylinders, but between a 4 or an 8 cylinder is maybe $50 per 6 months.
Rego you can pay per 6 or 12 months, this is about $350 per 6 months for an 8 cylinder.
Rego for diesel or LPG is all equal here, diesel is more expensive as petrol, and lpg is only a bit cheaper as petrol.

In this Rego there's also an insurance, but this only covers physical damage, not the damage on property.
The insurance for property isn't mandatory here.
Insurance in The Netherlands and Tasmania is about equal, about $10 per fortnite.

In The Netherlands cars need to get an anual roadworthy test, in Tasmania not, but if you're rego is expired longer then 3 months you need to have a roadworthy test for a new registration.


How is it regulated in your country?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,638 Posts
In the UK it seems it is simpler and cheaper.

We have an annual MoT (Ministry of Transport) roadworthiness test that checks the whole car. Cost of that is capped at £54 a test but many test stations charge less (anything from £25 to £50). A fail means the car cannot be used on the road until the reasons for the fail have been put right and it is retested.

Road tax on a car first registered before March 2001 (so most P38s) is a flat rate, £155 a year for engine sizes up to 1549cc and £255 a year for anything larger no matter what the fuel is. From April 2001 it is on a sliding scale depending on CO2 emissions, anything from £0 for something less than 100 g/km up to £315 for anything over 225 g/km if registered before March 2006 or £555 for anything over 255 g/km if registered later. If on the post 2001 sliding scale, a car running on LPG gets a £10 a year discount. Road Tax can be paid monthly, every 6 months or annually.

Insurance is compulsory and can be third party only (so only covers damage you do to others), Third Party, Fire and Theft (damage to others and if your car catches fire or is stolen) or Fully Comprehensive (covers everything including damage you do to your own car). Cost between the different levels of cover is negligible but varies greatly. The cost is based on the likelihood of a claim so is based on where you live (increased/decreased risk of theft), driving history of the driver (how many accidents or motoring offences they have had), age of the driver (younger drivers pay far more as the likelihood of them having an accident is greater), type of car (is it something that is likely to be attractive to a car thief or statistically more likely to be involved in an accident?). It also takes into account the cost of repair in event of an accident so even the trim level of a car will alter the cost (a higher spec car with more options will cost more to repair than a base model). Any modifications are also taken into account as they may make the car more attractive to a thief or increase the likelihood of an accident (a car fitted with non-standard wide alloy wheels will be more attractive to a thief purely for the wheels and anyone fitting wide wheels is likely to drive it harder so more likely to be involved in an accident). This throws up some real oddities so an 18 year old in a 1.2 hatchback will pay far more than the same 18 year old in a family saloon as the odds of an 18 year old in a 1.2 hatchback having an accident are far greater than the odds of an 18 year old driving a family saloon. So basically, car insurance cost can be anything from under £100 a year for someone aged 30+ driving something ordinary up to an almost unlimited figure for a young driver in something considered a high risk.

Fuel prices are expensive compared with many countries (roughly the same as the Netherlands for petrol) with diesel being slightly more expensive than petrol but LPG being about half the price of petrol. Hence the number of petrol P38s in the UK running on LPG. Road tax is the same or slightly cheaper but running on half price fuel. So you get the power and smoothness of a V8 but with running costs the same or slightly less than the diesel.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
1,413 Posts
in the US this varies widely by region, state, locality and municipality. insurance is mandatory country wide, at a minimum liability and some agencies will not offer full coverage to older vehicles, normally the difference between liability and full coverage is capped at about 15 yrs of age and estimated market value of vehicle. liability requisites vary by state, some have a minimum coverage of $10,000, others much higher, your premiums are based on this and other criteria such as driving record, age of driver, neighborhood where you reside, number of vehicles in policy, distance traveled daily per vehicle, if you own or rent your dwelling, if vehicle is used for pleasure, commute, business, if you park outdoors or garage, kind of safety systems, if anti theft devices etc. they call it "tier" system.

you pay road tax based on fuel type, estimated market value, price of acquisition, body style and weight upon initial registration, some states add number of cylinders.

In my state you pay, road tax every registration period of 2 yrs, personal property tax, annual safety inspection, regional bi-annual smog testing and my region the highest fuel tax per gallon of the state.

I am sure something is being overlooked and someone else from the US will chime in with more info from their region.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,638 Posts
Out of interest, as your insurance seems to be based on much the same as ours, how come there's kids using a P38 to go to school? There's no way someone of that age would get insurance on a P38 in the UK without paying a huge insurance premium. To give you a rough idea on the cost, my partner's 22 year old daughter with no driving experience was initially quoted over £3,000 a year for insurance on a 2006 Nissan Micra that she only paid £600 for. Finally managed to get it for £800 a year which everyone thought was a good deal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
989 Posts
In California and rest of the US, insurance is based on the driver's stats and driving record then the value of the vehicle and risk category. Liability (paying for damage to others cars and/or bodies) is mandatory, where collision (pay for the drivers car) is optional. Collision for a P38 is going to be cheap since they will total it quickly due to low value. Kids are going to pay high rates due to their lack of experience. But the insurance price difference between a P38 and an old Toyota Corolla are going to be small due to similar value. Its sports cars that are nearly un-insurable for kids from a value and risk perspective.
What is really lacking here is the inspection to confirm road worthiness. In California, if your smog equipment works and passes, you can drive a total POS with bald tires and nobody is going to remove it from the road. In states without smog testing requirements, there isn't even that check.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
The United States is difficult because literally every state is different. I’m in the most western part of Florida with Alabama less than ten minutes from my house but it might as well be two different countries on how vehicle registrations are handled/taxed.

In Florida I register a boat, tag a car, get a land deed, get a fishing license, get a hunting license, get a business or occupational license, get a drivers license, apply for a concealed firearms license and pay my property taxes all in one office. Very convenient! We do not have any type vehicle inspections so if it has safety belts, horn and lights you can tag it. Insurance is required or your license is automatically suspended. When you get a new license plate you pay an initial impact fee of $225 but the tag is yours for life and you can transfer it to any car you purchase for the rest of your life. If you don’t need a tag anymore you surrender it back to the tax collector and they keep it on file til you need it again. Annual registration taxes are based on the vehicle weight with the amount ranging from $35 (my VW Golf Sportwagen) to $54 for the P38. My wife’s small crossover CUV is $38 a year, the state just recently cut all fees in half for citizens. Titles when you initially buy a vehicle from another state cost $85 to have reissued in Florida and if you finance a vehicle you have to pay approximately 0.5% of the loan value in a tax stamp. Vehicle sales tax at purchase is 6% for the first $5,000 and then 2% after. Interestingly Boats/Yachts are capped at $15,000 max sales tax, hints why so many American yachts are homeported in Florida. Drivers licenses cost $25 and require more documentation to prove citizenship to get than a Top Secret government clearance. We have no state income taxes and our property taxes are dirt cheap.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
I should add insurance on the P38 runs $936 a year for liability with $500,000 in protection. No collision or comprehension.
 

·
Premium Member
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
425 Posts
Forgot to say this insurance was based on 29 years no incidents.

Here in Costa Rica I pay for the 2000 my v8 180 USD per year for marchamo.
That includes 3rd party insurance and road tax and some other obscure taxes.

RTV is due nice a year and is about 22 USD.


Enviado desde mi SM-A720F mediante Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
450 Posts
dose anyone know what international rego costs eg people that travel with their vehicles pay international rego and I don't think its much at all. is it true ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,638 Posts
Don't understand.... I take it rego is registration but what do you mean by international rego?
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
450 Posts
when people put their vehicles in a container and send them from America to Russia for example, they pay an international rego. the reason I ask is because I ran into a person in a classic rangie in Tassie and he stated the rego was like 60 us dollars for international rego, he was from America and stated that he take the rover everyware (very much a purpose built vehicle for doing this ) it also had a different plate with usa on it, it was also a left hand drive diesel which was what got my attention because the us didn't have diesels . anyway can someone shed some light on this as I had to accept what he said because I didn't know about this . he said he had taken it all over the world and this was his second trip to Australia . it defiantly had different rego plate on it , that i can say!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,638 Posts
Can't speak for other countries but in Europe you are classed as a tourist, so the car is a temporary import, unless you stay more than 6 months in the one country. So it retains the registration of the country it is registered in. My UK insurance covers me for all EU and EEA countries but when I drove through Serbia (not EU), I had to buy a months worth of Serbian insurance to extend the cover. When I drove into Russia, as well as having previously extended my insurance to cover me there, I was issued with a paper to show my car was a temporary import and I had to produce that when I left the country to prove I had bought it into the country legitimately and was taking it back out.

You could in theory drive all around the world and the only thing you would have to pay would be for temporary insurance that covered damage to anyone or anything that you caused damage to (assuming insurance is compulsory in that country). The car is still registered in it's home country unless it is permanently imported into another country or intends to stay for more than 6 months in the case of the EU or whatever the rules are in the country you are in at the time.
 

·
Premium Member
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
425 Posts
In central America you need an insurance in each country, plus a customs fee no matter where you and your plate is from.
Generally it us cheaper in South America, only Brazil is a but expensive. For up to 3 months for a Classic or a Disco 2 you pay between 15 (Panamá) and 50 USD

Enviado desde mi SM-A720F mediante Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
450 Posts
so the vehicle is already registered and the 60 us is for a permit to us the vehicle in Australia . that makes sense .basically every time you cross a boarder you require another permit .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,638 Posts
That's right but it isn't a permit as such, it's almost certainly local insurance. Some countries that charge a road tax (a tax that allows you to use the car on the road) may decide to charge you a tax too but most countries accept that if all taxes are paid in the country of registration, then no further taxes need be paid in another country. Being charged to enter a country doesn't exactly encourage tourism. You being in Tasmania may make it harder to understand as you can't easily drive to another country but when I drive in Europe, I can cross through 6 or 7 countries in a day with no additional charges as my insurance, in common with every other insurance issued in any EU country, covers use in all EU countries.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
46 Posts
In Ohio here, vehicle registration runs about $50 a year with liability insurance being mandatory. Between the three cars, with full coverage on all of them... insurance runs me about $800 a year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
In Maryland, which is one of the more expensive American states, the cost to register is about 185 for two years with emissions testing every two years at about 15. Insurance is required and it typically runs about 600 per car per year for decent liability limits (mine if 500k and 1 million per accident) and a clean driving record.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
355 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
when people put their vehicles in a container and send them from America to Russia for example, they pay an international rego. the reason I ask is because I ran into a person in a classic rangie in Tassie and he stated the rego was like 60 us dollars for international rego, he was from America and stated that he take the rover everyware (very much a purpose built vehicle for doing this ) it also had a different plate with usa on it, it was also a left hand drive diesel which was what got my attention because the us didn't have diesels . anyway can someone shed some light on this as I had to accept what he said because I didn't know about this . he said he had taken it all over the world and this was his second trip to Australia . it defiantly had different rego plate on it , that i can say!

In europe, with the countries who are part of the EU, the countries have to accept vehicles from other EU countries like they are and if they comply with the roadworthy rules of the country the car is registered in.
Germany doesn't do it always, the like to hand out fines at bikers for being too loud.

For countries outside the EU, I think they can refuse cars who don't comply with the rules of the country you enter, but you must be quite unlucky to get in trouble I think..

Regarding insurance, it depends on the insurer, like in Europe you can drive from one country to another, so insurance companies have this in their policy, but countries like Australie most likely doesn't have this in their policies because no takes their car over the border.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top