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Previous posts on the matter are geared towards new RRs. Any tips and advice on washing and waxing a classic? I just learned what a clay bar is/does....
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Glad you learned about a clay bar.

Depending upon how particular you are there are many routes to go down. I'm OCD when it comes to paint condition so for a Classic I'd recommend investing into a PorterCable and some Zaino products.

If you dont want to spend the money on a portercable then I'd just recommend applying Zaino Z5 and Z2 to recondition (ie fill minor swirl marks) and protect the paint.

.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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You have Chinese ones do you? We get Polish ones in UK. Squirt some stuff on it to loosen the dirt, blast it with a pressure washer, wash it off with soapy stuff, another blast with the pressure washer a squirt of some stuff that makes it a bit shiny and chamois leather to get the water off. I get charged £7 for a Rangie or £5 for a standard car. It's a Range Rover for chrissakes, not a Rolls Royce, it's supposed to be dirty......
 

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It's a Range Rover for chrissakes, not a Rolls Royce, it's supposed to be dirty......
It's a painted luxury vehicle with collector appeal, not a stainless steel DeLorean and actually it is essentially the Rolls Royce of SUVs in all ways.

It NEEDS to be regularly washed and waxed, otherwise the sun and contaminants destroy the clearcoat and paint . . . and then you have an unsightly parts car with no curb appeal and drastically diminished value.

A Classic's old paint needs certain maintenance such as clay barring, polishing, and waxing. In fact, all paint should have that done annually (waxing should be done at least a couple times per year)
 

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It NEEDS to be regularly washed and waxed, otherwise the sun and contaminants destroy the clearcoat and paint
yes, I really agree to this as well.

Zaino is a good product - personally I use product from Griot Garage.

As my Rangie has fresh paint, no need for polish at this point.

However, it does get clayed 2 a year - before Winter hibernation and in Spring when it awakes.

Depending on the usage and how the paint feels will determine the waxing schedule.

I use Griot Speedshine after every wash.

Rangie is garaged and I leave it uncovered so that everything underneath has a change to really dry out.

The Saab is 10 years old so once a year it gets a polish - it is also red.

As it is my DD and sits outside during the day at work, the claying and waxing process is every 4 months.

Also use Griot Speedshine on it after each wash which really helps the wax last.

We have a 3rd car so during the weekends the Saab usually is in the garage.

The Saab's paint is in excellent condition especially considering that it is red and sits outside most of the time.

The Rangie's paint will be as well 10 years down the road.
 

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If you use a clay bar you should always polish afterwards.

Have never had the need to use a clay bar as I have found that a simple wash and polish will remove any contaminants my vehicles come into contact with.

Going off-road, my main issue are scratches, which a clay bar will do nothing for.
 

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If you use a clay bar you should always polish afterwards
Interesting comment as a major, respected car care product manufacture doesn't have quite the same position:

"Most folks figure polishing is all that is needed to remove the roughness you can feel with your fingertips and clean the paint to get it ready for waxing, but polishing is unnecessary unless you are removing a scratch. You may only need to clean the paint to get it ready for waxing."

http://www.griotsgarage.com/product/paint+cleaning+clay.do?sortby=ourPicks

Of course if your paint does have scratches from off-roading or whatnot, yes, polishing would be in order.

But not necessary for just waxing.

By the way, are you following my posts?
 

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Interesting comment as a major, respected car care product manufacture doesn't have quite the same position:

"Most folks figure polishing is all that is needed to remove the roughness you can feel with your fingertips and clean the paint to get it ready for waxing, but polishing is unnecessary unless you are removing a scratch. You may only need to clean the paint to get it ready for waxing."

http://www.griotsgarage.com/product/paint+cleaning+clay.do?sortby=ourPicks

Of course if your paint does have scratches from off-roading or whatnot, yes, polishing would be in order.

But not necessary for just waxing.

By the way, are you following my posts?
It would appear that there is varying advice out there. Just a quick google search and these are from the first 3 I looked at:
First website
Tech Note: Clay Bars will not remove scratches, swirls marks, dull or oxidized paint, or restore surface gloss. This is accomplished by polishing the surface after claying. Please keep in mind that polishing alone will not remove paint contamination.
Polishing and Finishing:
After claying the surface, you have two options. If the vehicle's paint is in like-new condition (good paint gloss and no swirls), you can finish by applying your favorite wax or paint sealant. If the finish shows any swirls or lacks luster, polish with a swirl remover or finishing polish and then apply a final coat of wax or paint sealant.

Second website
After you’re done claying the car and you’ve exposed a smooth new surface, you have a few options for your next step.
Some say to re-wash the car to remove any potential debris from the claying process, and some say it’s not necessary. Personally, I like to do a quick wash afterwards to make absolutely sure that any debris is removed along with the residue of the clay lubricant.
If you’re machine polishing, then you’re surface is prepped and ready. If you want to do it by hand, a product like Dodo Juice’s Lime Prime pre-wax cleanser (for light defect removal), or their Lime Prime Lite (no abrasives) to give the paint a nice shine, and a good base for waxing.
Or finally at this point you can go straight to your favorite wax or sealant.

Third website
Always follow claying with a wax or sealant. Clay will removing existing wax and may leave tiny holes where contaminants have been removed. They must be sealed in order to protect the paint from corrosion.
 

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I find that claying tends to leave light scratches that polishing then removes.
 

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I find that claying tends to leave light scratches that polishing then removes.
Yeah, I've seen other folks say the same on the light scratches.

Guessing that is why the lubricate and clean clay is important.

So far so good with my claying process with Griot's stuff which is one reason I use / like it.

In any case, claying gives a good surface to do the next step whether it's wax or polish / then wax.

And good point to remember as pointed in the above post - the paint / clear coat needs some type of protection after claying.

It is pretty cool though how smooth the surface is when finished.
 
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