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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone have any good ideas on removing water spots on clearcoat?
My wife parks her black Disco on a street with sprinklers and the water bakes in the sun here in Los Angeles.
Passenger side doesn't look good.
I've tried several different polishes - nothing too abrasive,but no go.
The guy at my accessory shop says clay won't work on that as it has bound to the clearcoat and clay only removes surface contamination - he says it needs to be abraded off.
Any ideas?
Thanks
 

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Are they white, like from hard water, i.e. chalk. If so use some rain water with a little descaler from hardwear shop.

Do a test first on cool paint and not in the sun, works for me but England has a bit more rain water :lol:

I sell AutoGlym and got the tip from the guys there, you would think they would have made some thing to do that by now.

SID.
 

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You need some G3,

It will remove the laquer a thin layer at a time. Worst case scenario will be by removing all the laquer where the laquer will have to be replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes, white and baked on in the California sun.
Unfortunately I can't remember when it last rained here - probably a year so rainwater is out. I wonder what the magic property is in rain water, that maybe I can substitute with distilled or Perrier. That would be good - I live in Beverly Hills so imagine a tourists driving by and me washing my my car with Perrier - it would cause a sensation in Hullo magazine! Descaler if some form of acid isn't it - so maybe vinegar would work like cleaning a kettle, Hmm, I'll try that thank you!

SID said:
Are they white, like from hard water, i.e. chalk. If so use some rain water with a little descaler from hardwear shop.

Do a test first on cool paint and not in the sun, works for me but England has a bit more rain water :lol:

I sell AutoGlym and got the tip from the guys there, you would think they would have made some thing to do that by now.

SID.
 

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I do have a mate that washes his RRClassic with water plus 20% vinegar. Works well
 

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jacekk said:
Anyone have any good ideas on removing water spots on clearcoat?
My wife parks her black Disco on a street with sprinklers and the water bakes in the sun here in Los Angeles.
deas?
Thanks
Try autopia.org, these folks are serious about detailing, polishing and compunding. I had to do some correction on my 4.6s hood (bonnet) and used 3M perfect it 2 followed by Menzerna final polish followed by Sonus swirlbuster all applied with a dual actin polisher,and then Klasse as a sealant. Make sure you mask off the edges and corners where the polish can burn through quickly. I was not able to completely remove all the water mark and bird bomb stains as they were too deep into the clearcoat and wanst brave enough to cut that much
David
 

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Not exactly contributing here, but I just wanted to say that you should go ahead and wash your car w/ Perrier or better yet S. Pellegrino or Voss just for the hell of it.

I can just imagine the face of tourists in amazement.....Funny just thinking about it. Who knows, you might start a new trend in BH. Premier car wash service, washed w/ virgin S. Pellegrino..........
 

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I recommend a gentle process of de-sensitisation: a little salt at the beach, sand in the desert, some mud and new pinstripes in the brush. You will enjoy yourself a lot and the Water Spots will fade into insignificance.
 

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green_rangie said:
I recommend a gentle process of de-sensitisation: a little salt at the beach, sand in the desert, some mud and new pinstripes in the brush. You will enjoy yourself a lot and the Water Spots will fade into insignificance.
Not a bad suggestion, but for the original poster, someone already mentioned vinegar solution. It does work. I just did this a couple weeks ago to one of my cars. Same issue with sprinklers when parking on the side of the street. I made a 1:1 vinegar/water solution and just went over the spotted areas with a folded towel soaked in the solution. 1:1 is probably more concentrated than you need. Above suggestion was 20%.

One warning. Realize that vinegar is acetic acid. After rinsing with water, you should really rinse the vinegar washed areas well with a baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) solution to neutralize the acid. I thought about it but didn't do this, and now I have tiny corrosion spots along some pieces of anodized aluminum trim on the panels that I washed. Otherwise the vinegar works fine. My problem may be specific to the placement of the trim and other bits on this car since there is a rubber gasket that runs along the aluminum piece, and vinegar solution got trapped between the gasket and trim and didn't rinse off well with a stream of clean water. Would have been better to treat with the baking soda.

Brett
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks Brett, makes sense.
Brett San Diego said:
[quote="green_rangie":r35eo2ra]I recommend a gentle process of de-sensitisation: a little salt at the beach, sand in the desert, some mud and new pinstripes in the brush. You will enjoy yourself a lot and the Water Spots will fade into insignificance.
Not a bad suggestion, but for the original poster, someone already mentioned vinegar solution. It does work. I just did this a couple weeks ago to one of my cars. Same issue with sprinklers when parking on the side of the street. I made a 1:1 vinegar/water solution and just went over the spotted areas with a folded towel soaked in the solution. 1:1 is probably more concentrated than you need. Above suggestion was 20%.

One warning. Realize that vinegar is acetic acid. After rinsing with water, you should really rinse the vinegar washed areas well with a baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) solution to neutralize the acid. I thought about it but didn't do this, and now I have tiny corrosion spots along some pieces of anodized aluminum trim on the panels that I washed. Otherwise the vinegar works fine. My problem may be specific to the placement of the trim and other bits on this car since there is a rubber gasket that runs along the aluminum piece, and vinegar solution got trapped between the gasket and trim and didn't rinse off well with a stream of clean water. Would have been better to treat with the baking soda.

Brett[/quote:r35eo2ra]
 

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Personally I would just wash the car afterwards with a good
solution of car shampoo. You can do just as much damage with
alkaline solutions, if they are too strong as with acidic solutions.
And vinegar isn't that strong, compared to what I have been used to using.
 

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q-rover said:
Personally I would just wash the car afterwards with a good
solution of car shampoo. You can do just as much damage with
alkaline solutions, if they are too strong as with acidic solutions.
And vinegar isn't that strong, compared to what I have been used to using.
Bicarbonate is less on the basic side of neutral than acetic acid is on the acidic side. In terms of avoiding corrosion, I'd rather be mildly basic than mildly acidic. That said, depending on the car soap, it may contain enough buffers to neutralize any excess acetic acid from this process once the bulk of the acetic acid has been thoroughly rinsed off. Now that I think of it, I did do my acetic acid wipe down after washing the affected panels and seeing that the spots persisted, and I did not wash again with car soap. Just did a good rinse down with the hose.

Brett
 

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There is a product called the "magic clay bar" it will remove any impurity from the surface of your paint. If your fun chemical solutions don't work pick up the clay and give it a shot. Most hand car washes will clay your car for about $100 I think.
 
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