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Discussion Starter #1
2003 RR 4.4L US Version
I removed the vanos solenoid on the passenger side by unscrewing it by hand with no problem, cleaned it and replaced with a new gasket. Removed the gasket on the driver side one, but the solenoid spins but doe snot come out. An internet search on a bimmer site indicates a 32mm deep well socket is necessary to remove the drivers side. Is that correct information? Not sure why one side would require a socket and one would not, unless the passenger side one was loose. Motor has that crazy knock after an oil change and the passenger side vanos solenoid was leaking at the gasket.

Thanks,
Brian
 

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well.. both should have only come out with a socket.. If it's spinning probably broken somewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I am not opposed to replacing them both since I will already have them out. Anyone know a part number?
 

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Part # BMW-11367524489

basically any VVT solenoid for an M62tu will work, be smart and don't order anything Chinese (non name brand), or Dormann.
 

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I have not taken ours out but curious as to how the housing secures to the guts. Can you tell from the one you took out whether the jacket could slip on the inner guts. I assume the socket was in deep enough. Curious if you bought the thin wall socket or used a cheap plumbing socket that I have read that some have used. Never thought that one might unscrew by hand:dance: as i have the seals but not the socket to remove-at least not the thin wall socket required. Ours made lifter noise after the last change and the bmw solution is to rev engine to 3000 rpm for 3 minutes-up to 10 cycles to bleed them.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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FWIW I have read that revving the the engine in neutral/park is not good for the transmission this pertains to the BMW engine/ trans,
something about extra pressure being generated by the torque converter.
 

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yep you'd be correct, 5HP24 doesn't like it very much.

I've gotten rid of the hydraulic lifter tap by just driving on the tollway, 2500rpms or so and within a half hour the tap is gone.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I have not taken ours out but curious as to how the housing secures to the guts. Can you tell from the one you took out whether the jacket could slip on the inner guts. I assume the socket was in deep enough. Curious if you bought the thin wall socket or used a cheap plumbing socket that I have read that some have used. Never thought that one might unscrew by hand:dance: as i have the seals but not the socket to remove-at least not the thin wall socket required. Ours made lifter noise after the last change and the bmw solution is to rev engine to 3000 rpm for 3 minutes-up to 10 cycles to bleed them.
Once you remove the gasket, about any size deep well 32mm socket will work. I had one that was loose enough to be removed by hand. The other one needed the socket, but you have to remove the coolant hose that sits in front of it to get the socket on. Mine still tapped after being cleaned, but the diesel/tapping sound diminishes after it warms up. It may be the timing guides because it sounds like metal slapping metal. Dropped it off at a local indy BMW shop to have them go through it. I am not equipped to do the Vanos nor the timing chain/guides.
 

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The end with the connector (outside) has internal wires that run to the end that has the 32mm fitting on it (inside) which activate the solenoid plunger. If one rotates the outside the chances are high that the wires will twist and break. I don't know what the internals look like but I would imagine some twisting may be okay, depending on how much play the wires have length wise, but I would guess they may fray and short. Best approach is to apply torque only to the inside. You can test the electrical operation with some certainty with a 12v battery and hear a click as the internal solenoid piston activates and the plunger moves. If you hear nothing you ruined the unit.

That is why one uses the 32mm socket to remove the solenoid and not the outside end. Hand tight torque is okay to start threading, but one runs a huge risk of ruining the unit by exerting torque on the outside. The inside and outside, as I have labeled them, should be approached as one unit that can break internally and any force applied only to the inside 32mm fitting.
 

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Thx. for the heads up on the rpm. i did read also about a relief hole in the newer trans to avoid overpressure but cannot remember which trans, ours or the P before the 322. great options valve noise or no trans.
 

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Zubi is correct you need a 32mm thin wall socket that is deep enough - if one can find a plumbing tool that is 32mm, thin and deep enough that can handle the torque (which is not that much) why not. If it is too thick it will not fit into the hole that is exposed when the seal is removed.

How it is constructed - I would assume the two outer metal pieces parts are pressed/crimped together.
 
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