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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
is there anyone offering a similar service to that provided by rover renovations. I have an old valve block to be refurbished and kept as a spare. I know it needs a complete overhaul.

Thanks

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
too much mucking around for me - did the o rings myself and that didn't fix it - happy to get someone who knows what they're doing to get it right first time - thanks anyway
 

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I assume you mean a service like Rover Renovations USED to offer. Dennis has been out of business for ages. Have you checked with Scotty to see what he has in stock and can send you? Quite frankly as easy as it is to rebuild and as inexpensive as the parts are you are far better off jsut doing this your self in an afternoon.
 

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Has anyone bought and used the complete kit from the ebay seller "symlisep38parts"? I am planning to buy from this seller since he offers the most complete kit for the valve block and the compressor..
 

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Yes, it's been fine, it's also the longest single time I've yet spent on the EAS, a couple of hours slowly disassembling and then identifying where all the orings go (before fitting any of them) and then installing them as carefully as possible, make sure you get all the old ones out before starting, I made one mistake and tried to fix a solenoid before realising one large oring was still stuck in there.
 

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I bought a compressor seal kit from "symlisep38parts". It has been in a couple of years and is still working fine. They do good stuff IMHO. I previously got a PTFE filled one from the Netherlands but it did not last.

I have rebuilt a few valve blocks and I have also built a test rig to bench test them.

Replacing the seals is not difficult but it can be quite time consuming.

You just need to take your time and be methodical. Do one solenoid at a time.

It is a quick job to swap the valve blocks over.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
ok - you have all encouraged me to give it a go - I bought a replacement valve block from Shupack just before he closed up so I still have the original to rebuild and have as a spare

Regards

Andrew
 

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It is not about money, it is about the quality. You know the consequences of poor labor quality, becuse you were on the bump stops one day :) Here we have very low labor costs, it is even free to clear the faults, changing o-rings, but I prefer to do it myself because this seems really easy, but you have to be careful and be sure everything is in exact place. EAS Cable is ~20$, software is free, complete set is ~60$, and the quality of your own work is priceless :)
 

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Has anyone bought and used the complete kit from the ebay seller "symlisep38parts"? I am planning to buy from this seller since he offers the most complete kit for the valve block and the compressor..
I did and they're fine as sellers but the silicon oring set I bought from them didn't work and I drove myself crazy for months after trying to find leaks everywhere BUT the newly-overhauled valve block.

It was only after eliminating everything else that suspicion fell on the valve block again and re-doing it with regular rubber (black) orings sorted it out. It was after that I found a post on here explaining why silicon doesn't work (as well as) regular rubber for the valve block. http://www.rangerovers.net/forum/7-range-rover-mark-ii-p38/27888-o-ring-sizes-p38-eas-air-lines.html

Anyhoo... yes they're fine but I'd strongly advise against them silicon orings.

It's an easy job to do- the key is ABSOLUTE cleanliness. Make sure you clean out any bit of the valve block that the orings will press against- lint free cloth and residue-free window cleaner worked the best for me and lubricate the orings with silicon grease when installing and you'll be fine.

Also- if you're using a Britpart valveblock, be careful when tightening the self tapping screws on the top of the valves. Britpart uses a different grade plastic than Landrover did on the original valveblocks and it's quite easy to strip the threads if you overighten.

Good luck!
 

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I did and they're fine as sellers but the silicon oring set I bought from them didn't work and I drove myself crazy for months after trying to find leaks everywhere BUT the newly-overhauled valve block.

It was only after eliminating everything else that suspicion fell on the valve block again and re-doing it with regular rubber (black) orings sorted it out. It was after that I found a post on here explaining why silicon doesn't work (as well as) regular rubber for the valve block. http://www.rangerovers.net/forum/7-range-rover-mark-ii-p38/27888-o-ring-sizes-p38-eas-air-lines.html

Anyhoo... yes they're fine but I'd strongly advise against them silicon orings.

It's an easy job to do- the key is ABSOLUTE cleanliness. Make sure you clean out any bit of the valve block that the orings will press against- lint free cloth and residue-free window cleaner worked the best for me and lubricate the orings with silicon grease when installing and you'll be fine.

Also- if you're using a Britpart valveblock, be careful when tightening the self tapping screws on the top of the valves. Britpart uses a different grade plastic than Landrover did on the original valveblocks and it's quite easy to strip the threads if you overighten.

Good luck!
Oh no I already bought it :) I hope they made some improvements, otherwise another 60$ is on the way :)
 

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Well maybe you'll have better luck than me...... and I'm sure someone will be along in a minute telling you I'm talking out of my behind and that their silicon orings are working just fine. I actually have a mix of silicon and rubber in mine at the moment! Rubber on the 4 airspring valves as well as all air harness terminations, rubber diaphragm, rubber checkvalves but silicon everywhere else

Just be aware of the how much the compressor runs and whether the car drops or rises excessively (i.e. more than an inch) when parked overnight.

It might work fine and you'll be home free- just don't eliminate the valveblock from the list of suspects if you find signs of leaks, purely on the ground that it's just had a set of brand new silicon orings put in.

If nothing else, it'll be good practise stripping down and rebuilding the valveblock!

:grin:
 

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You'll be fine, immediately after install I noticed it dropped a bit more, but I still had one original airspring left which accounted for most of this. I just drove it and used it (get some heat into the enginebay) and left them to conform to their new home, since I changed out that last airspring it's bordering on perfect, I can't see anything untoward at all (6 months since orings installed), its way under the LR accepted drop of 15mm per day.

I also installed them completely dry as I could see no evidence to the contrary from what I was removing, I also don't want any bits of dust to stick or congregate anywhere on the seals.

The only addition is silicone to the compressor oring, I know Storey in his videos said that this is an addition that shouldn't be done, however I think this is as it was from the factory and its done to keep it in place, as due to its location (under the reed valve) its not clamped tight like a normal oring would be, but could 'walk' out its hole, not immediately likely, but possible over time.
 
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