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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Has anyone used the under rocker air tank as a source for compressed air. I'm getting ready to swap out my oval shaped tank, for the longer cylindrical one, so I can fit the deployable side steps, and was wondering if anyone has ever installed a "t" fitting on the fill line that could be run to a separate manual isolation valve and 1/4" air chuck for connecting an air line? This would be for VERY intermittant use for things like reinflating tires after use on sand, or possibly for an off road tire repair. There's almost 10 liters of 300 psi air in that tank at most times and the tank is isolated from the shocks unless it it changing the ride height. Good idea, bad idea? Oh, BTW LR took out a patent for an automatic tire inflation deflation system on RR's using the suspension air tank and compressor in 2017. Not looking for anything near as fancy as that, just a way to access the air in the tank for manual filling. there does appear to be some kind of a kit for doing this at Atlantic British.

 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #3
What year truck do you have, up to late in the 06 year the RR's used a RQN500020 tank, its a short (maybe 36" long) fat, oval shaped tank with an extended mounting bracket on the front end. It takes up most of the space between the inner and outer frames. The late 06 thru the 2010's used a RQN500080 tank which is a longer skinnier cylindrical tank, maybe 4" in diameter.

Theres a thread from 10 nonths ago about installing the steps and what the tanks look like here:


I got my steps from a local dealer for $275, they tried to beat me up for 380 but I told them I can go down to New Jersey (I occassionally work in NYC) and get them for 263 so they cut me a deal. Still need the ECU and harness but the tank is sitting in my basement.
 

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Mine is a 2012 year. I will be trying to tie in to the air system also for utility air for inflating tires and whatnot. Thanks for the idea.


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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #6
I believe the threads on the tank are female M20 X 1.5. Don't know the diameter of the plastic (nylon or whatever it is) tubing. If you put a "T" fitting in make sure the first thing attached to the "T" is a valve to manually shut it off, incase the hose to the new air chuck fitting blows up,breaks or falls off.
 

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I believe the threads on the tank are female M20 X 1.5. Don't know the diameter of the plastic (nylon or whatever it is) tubing. If you put a "T" fitting in make sure the first thing attached to the "T" is a valve to manually shut it off, incase the hose to the new air chuck fitting blows up,breaks or falls off.
Anyone who has done this modification, please let me know what parts that you used. I am not interested in cutting the air line to jerry rig a T in to the line. It would be much better if I could thread a t in to the system but I am not sure what the threads are.


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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I’m not sure that this is a great idea. The air suspension requires very dry air to avoid corrosion. The air is filtered and dried on the way into the system. The stored dry air is then flushed back through the desiccant when the system deflates.

Running the compressor for a long period will saturate the desiccant and allow moisture into the air suspension.

I would suggest that a few hundred bucks for a good dedicated compressor is a better investment. A tank is not required.
 

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This is not for factory air systems. It is an accessory to an ARB compressor.


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