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2010 Range Rover Sport Supercharged 5.0l
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I have a 2010 RRS supercharged and I'm replacing all my bushings with poly bushings. So far I have managed to complete front uppers and lowers along with rear lowers. But I am struggling to figure out how to get the rear upper bushings out. Anyone done this and can shed some light? It's completely different than the others and with my luck, the bolts are seized inside too.
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If the bolts weren't seized inside that looks to be the proper way. Just can't seem to get mine out.
 

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That tool should still work. The push cylinder is hollow and is supposed to sit on the outer part of the bushing, so the cut bolt won't be in the way.

What did yo use to cut the bolts? I used a sawzall with a carbide blade (until it got dull), the switched to a regular metal blade.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Does that rod not need to slide through the inside of the bushing? And just a reciprocating saw with a metal blade
 

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Just as an aside - why are you replacing with poly bushes - one of the worst mistakes you can make - they will make the ride on the RRS so bad. You would be better off with quality rubber items like Meyle.
 

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Does that rod not need to slide through the inside of the bushing? And just a reciprocating saw with a metal blade
My mistake, yes, the rod in needs to slide through the center. I think I saw another one where it's like a C-clamp so it can sit on the outside.

I have the same issue as what you have. Maybe I can drill through the rubber and the cut it out with a jigsaw so the tool will work. I'll need to figure something out as soon as it arrives.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Just as an aside - why are you replacing with poly bushes - one of the worst mistakes you can make - they will make the ride on the RRS so bad. You would be better off with quality rubber items like Meyle.
A few reasons. I wanted a tighter feel to it.
Price was a quarter of replacing the entire arms. Was lead to believe they lasted longer but mixed reviews on that.
And last the appeal of how easy they go in and came out meant for 500 bucks I could easily swap every single bushing in there cheap and easy come next time. What is Meyle btw?
 

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A few reasons. I wanted a tighter feel to it.
Price was a quarter of replacing the entire arms. Was lead to believe they lasted longer but mixed reviews on that.
And last the appeal of how easy they go in and came out meant for 500 bucks I could easily swap every single bushing in there cheap and easy come next time. What is Meyle btw?
Its your car and you can clearly do what you want but I dont think you will be happy with the result particularly if you are running large diameter, low profile tires. The cost with poly is about the same as rubber where the same method of replacement is used.

Meyle is a brand of very high quality rubber bushes that are considered to optimum for handling verses harshness and they last a very long time.

Good luck with it - I do hope is all goes as you expect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Its your car and you can clearly do what you want but I dont think you will be happy with the result particularly if you are running large diameter, low profile tires. The cost with poly is about the same as rubber where the same method of replacement is used.

Meyle is a brand of very high quality rubber bushes that are considered to optimum for handling verses harshness and they last a very long time.

Good luck with it - I do hope is all goes as you expect.
I'm not an average Range Rover owner. I daily a slammed Audi on coilovers, built mini trucks, lifted trucks, track cars all the above. Comfort was never the intention when buying this. I'm building it to be an overlander so I'll end up with some larger tires on it which will help balance out the "harsh" ride enough for me. I'm really just using the poly for ease of change. And like I said, it ends up being a quarter of the cost than changing the whole arm. $500 for all bushings vs $2,000 is well worth it in my opinion.
But I definitely will look into those Meyle bushings, they sound like a good compromise. Thank you!
 

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You dont have to change the whole arm - just as you changed the bushings with poly you could have done exactly the same with rubber so the cost would have been about the same. If you are looking at overlanding then poly is definitely not the way to go as articulation will be rstricted - you will find the suspension will bind at extremes and not get full travel.

But as I said - it is your vehicle do what you want but your cost argument is not relevant as you can just get new rubbers in your old arms, exactly the same as you did with the poly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You dont have to change the whole arm - just as you changed the bushings with poly you could have done exactly the same with rubber so the cost would have been about the same. If you are looking at overlanding then poly is definitely not the way to go as articulation will be rstricted - you will find the suspension will bind at extremes and not get full travel.

But as I said - it is your vehicle do what you want but your cost argument is not relevant as you can just get new rubbers in your old arms, exactly the same as you did with the poly.
I am aware of the articulation not having as much give offroading, but we are talking cm, not inches. In my eyes I can't see THAT big of a difference. Ran poly on my lifted suburban and changed absolutely nothing offroading. Are they as big of a pain to install as they are to remove? It has taken me two weeks to remove the old ones and took me about 10 minutes to install all the poly. Maybe 15 with the other 4 bushings. I'm genuinely curious because if I made a big mistake I'd rather know for future application. Always willing to improve!
 

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I managed to get my bushing out, although I'm not certain if part of the sleeve is still stuck in the knuckle. The replacement bushing is coming today so I'll know for sure this evening.

I had a to use a Ball Joint Removal Tool with a socket on one end (inside the bushing) to get the bushing out, then a Bearing Press and Pull Sleeve Kit with a socket on the one end to get part of the outer ring of the busing pushed out the other side.

In retrospect I should have used loaner tools for everything, but I ended buying the Bearing Press and Pull Sleeve Kit because I didn't think of checking AutoZone for a loaner first.

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I managed to get my bushing out, although I'm not certain if part of the sleeve is still stuck in the knuckle. The replacement bushing is coming today so I'll know for sure this evening.

I had a to use a Ball Joint Removal Tool with a socket on one end (inside the bushing) to get the bushing out, then a Bearing Press and Pull Sleeve Kit with a socket on the one end to get part of the outer ring of the busing pushed out the other side.

In retrospect I should have used loaner tools for everything, but I ended buying the Bearing Press and Pull Sleeve Kit because I didn't think of checking AutoZone for a loaner first.

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That one I'm not too worried about but I appreciate the pics. Might help when I get to it. I'm talking about the bushings that connect to the chassis
 

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I replaced the entire control arm along with the bushings, but from the research I did online it's the same process for the other bushings.

There was one YouTube video where the guy used a bench vise in a similar method to the ball joint removal tool (cup on one side of the bushing, socket on the other to push it through). He removed all three bushings (although I don't think it was a Land Rover) and they came out quite easily. He added penetrating oil several times to help loosen them.

I finally got my bushing installed. The bushing sleeve was still stuck in the knuckle in the photos I uploaded, so I had to extract that as well. Used the Bearing Press and Pull Sleeve Kit to both extract the sleeve (using 2 cups, one of the upside down do the flat surface would push against the bushing sleeve to get it started) and insert the new bushing (2 cups fit best on this) . Worked really well.

There's no way I could have gotten everything done without all the tools at my disposal.

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