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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #1
OK I know this topic makes some of you twitch. I want to discuss the Rover EAS system as it applies to a 95 LWB... please this thread should have no mention of coils.

A previous owner removed all of the EAS components from my 95 LWB, except the switches in the dash which were repurposed. I mean everything, even the majority of the wiring harness. I tow often and have started to think I'd like to try this with a working EAS system, and I don't want to upgrade to a P38 or newer... I'm attached to this LWB. Yes, I said several things that might not be all that reasonable.... get over it. :) We own Rovers so.... Note too that for me a complicated but interesting project is the fun part, having it completely done means the fun is done too.

Here are my thoughts and I'd like some opinions, and again the coils are mostly fine / functional (I've been using them for over 80,000 miles), but that is NOT what I want to discuss here. Options: (1) buy each component used and rebuild it all as it was original, or even buy some of these items new, this is both expensive and not easily done... finding these parts that is. I like to keep things on a reasonable budget just on principle. (2) Really go at this thinking more broadly... can I use P38 EAS components... Arnott gen III airbags... put the valve block/sensitive stuff under the hood and set up the whole system to be more robust. I note that O2batsea mentioned the possibility of using the P38 airbags on a classic ra few weeks back. I've had great luck using the later cruise ECU AMR5700 vrs the original AMR1147 so there is precedence in fitting later, upgraded Rover components to a classic. The Cruise upgrade was easy and has worked well for over 10,000 miles. I also note that on eBay there are lots of P38 EAS parts available and most are priced out pretty cheaply. There is very little RRC 93-95 stuff listed... long since thrown away maybe. The wiring and basic operating components are pretty much the same on the older and new EAS... how much can be interchanged with a "little modification." A little extra effort means a more robust system, maybe better all around.

So questions, I just want to explore options for now:

Has anyone fit P38 bags on a classic... O2batsea???

Are the wheel / height sensors on principle interchangeable Classic vrs P38, yes the mounts may be different but the basic sensor signal looks the same... given what I've read in RAVE and on-line... are the P38 units more robust?

The compressor / valve block / dryer / driver unit and assorted items seem about the same or slightly better (upgraded) on the P38... mounting location is certainly better.

The P38 wire harness should be much easier to get as salvage.

The the P38 ECU ANR4499/RQT100040 is readily available... the older AMR2289/3234 not so much. They seem to have the same inputs and outputs (different connectors, maybe not) and are still independent systems from the rest of the Rover... is there an advantage to using the later ECU? is is more robust, etc? Right now the two ECUs seem very similar much like the example I sited with the cruise control. In the archives I noted at least once it is said the ANR4499 can be used on the classic, and so the later RQT100040 perhaps. Should using the latest possible ECU be MOST desirable?

Has anyone else considered this path... I'd like to know what you have learned. Note nothing I'm proposing here means someone can't restore this Rover back to perfectly original on 20 years. Thanks, Jon
 

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No need for new parts save for bags. Bags are cheap and you'll be good for another 80-100K miles.

Sensors rarely fail. However there is no reason not to install used and recalibrate.

Valve blocks can easily be reringed/rebuilt. Again, no need for new.

Compressor can easily be rebuilt, no need for new.

That leaves the ECU itself. Again they rarely fail.

With that said you may be lucky and have much of the parts still installed. Most gorillas simply rip out the bags, unplug the electronics and toss in some springs.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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The valve block/compressor unit on a P38 is the same as what you would have had on a 95 Classic. The height sensors, while being a slightly different design, are simply potentiometers so could be used with a bit of modification to the mountings to make them fit. If it is possible to fit the P38 air springs, then go for the original Dunlop ones rather than Arnotts. The Arnotts are a lot more expensive, the Gen 11 is unreliable and the only advantage of the Gen111 is that it is longer so can give more travel if you want to lift the car which it appears you don't. Alternatively, get some used Classic air springs and fit replacement bellows (http://www.island-4x4.co.uk/spring-front-rubber-bellow-dunlop-ntc9819-ntc9819dph-p-899.html). While they may or may not be interchangeable, I can't see any reason why the later P38 ECU wouldn't work, it's doing just the same job. Heights may be different but they can be reprogrammed with the RSW software easily enough.

There would be nothing to stop you simply fitting the air springs, running air line from each to a central point and manually inflating each corner with a compressor. That would give you a starting point.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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1,458 Posts
...If it is possible to fit the P38 air springs, then go for the original Dunlop ones rather than Arnotts. The Arnotts are a lot more expensive, the Gen 11 is unreliable and the only advantage of the Gen111...
Interesting, I've always been told the Dunlops were no where near the Arnott Gen IIIs in terms of reliability. My plan to restore EAS had been to use the GenIIIs.

In terms of the sensor, I think you can get them new from the various Rover parts places, not as easy as across the pond, but I think AB or RN should be able to supply the bits.

The one thing I would add is a M.A.R.S. system.
http://www.rangerovers.net/forum/8-range-rover-classic/189514-rrc-mars-revisited.html
 

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Dunlops are a very basic design with really nothing to fail except for aging of the rubber. Arnott products have crimped instead of rolled bladders. Crimps failed at an alarming rate with original Arnott replacements. The Gen II were absolutely pathetic for quality. If it weren;t for the warranty I know many folks that would have liked to have stormed Arnott with pitch forks and torches. Gen III improved on quality but there are still reports of failed crimps leaving folks stranded. At least with old fashioned Dunlops you maintain the original design ability to pop a new bladder in place and be on your way.
 

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Dunlops are a very basic design with really nothing to fail except for aging of the rubber. Arnott products have crimped instead of rolled bladders. Crimps failed at an alarming rate with original Arnott replacements. The Gen II were absolutely pathetic for quality. If it weren;t for the warranty I know many folks that would have liked to have stormed Arnott with pitch forks and torches. Gen III improved on quality but there are still reports of failed crimps leaving folks stranded. At least with old fashioned Dunlops you maintain the original design ability to pop a new bladder in place and be on your way.
+ another vote for original Dunlops. At least you retain the ability to change one on the trail. I've only ever popped one in 10 years, but within 10 minutes a new bag was on and we were on our way. In fact it took longer to jack the Rover than to change the bag!
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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1,458 Posts
...At least you retain the ability to change one on the trail. I've only ever popped one in 10 years, but within 10 minutes a new bag was on and we were on our way. In fact it took longer to jack the Rover than to change the bag!
That happened to me more than 10 years ago, I was going up a snow-covered two track in Canyonlands National Park, when my right rear popped off. When I got out of the truck and saw it on the bumpstops, I almost had a heart attack, as I had no cellphone signal, and I was essentially by myself. Then, I remembered that the right rear bag always popped off when on my mechanic's lift. Sure enough, after jacking up the right rear, I was able to reseat the bag, and voila, I had a working suspension again. It did take me longer to jack the Rover as well!
 
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