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Motor Trend did an interesting experiment on ‘Unintended Acceleration’. http://www.motortrend.com/features/cons ... index.html It appears that modern small car brakes are able to supply over 500 hp of braking if the pedal is pushed very hard. RRS brakes are probably capable of much more.
Suggest a different ‘Best way to stop” then their article since probably shifting to anything will have no effect on the transmission. And probably pushing the stop button will not stop the engine either.
1 Put both feet on the brake pedal and push as hard as you can.
Soft pressure may heat the bakes causing them to fade as said in the article.
If the car is equipped with the system which senses both brake and accelerator for more than three second, the engine should shut down.
Give this a chance. Pushing the on –off button after the engine has shut down may restart it.
If not
2 After 3 seconds ( 264 ft @ 60 mph, about 15 car lengths) while holding the brake pedal with both feet, push the on off button for 3 seconds
This should stop the engine
If not
3 As the vehicle slows down to near 0 get passengers ready to jump out
4 As car nears 0 speed steer towards a solid object, such as a building or big tree
5 tell front passenger to get out
6 then tell rear passengers to get out. If rear gets out first the rear door may hit front passenger or the front passenger may hit door and close it on the rear passenger if the car has not stopped.
7 Once against something, get out fast, as the vehicle may fish tail when the brakes are released.

Note the Toyota in the test stopped in the same distance if the accelerator was fully depressed or not. Either the brakes are overkill or the rubber band was not wound very tight. If this is the case, how are people getting killed in Toyotas?
 

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bop08 said:
Motor Trend did an interesting experiment on ‘Unintended Acceleration’.

Note the Toyota in the test stopped in the same distance if the accelerator was fully depressed or not. Either the brakes are overkill or the rubber band was not wound very tight. If this is the case, how are people getting killed in Toyotas?
Simiple - people are getting killed because they panic. Rather than take any one of 3 courses of action, they freeze up. This is how that cop and his family got killed in California in that Lexus. What kind of dope, especially one with 'police' and situational training, would freeze up, call 911 all while the car was whizzing past 100 mph? There are a host of things you can do - smash the brakes, put the car in neutral, shut the car off. Even easier if you have a manual shift - just depress the clutch. I think it would be a good idea for ALL car manufacturers to have an aircraft-type arming switch which is essentially a kill switch that cuts power to the engine but retains your power braking and doesn't lock your steering while turning on your hazards so you could SAFELY coast to the shoulder. Computer assisted technology is great, but it complicates things 100x more than mechancial pieces since you're relying on code rather than moving parts.

While Toyota is clearly at fault, part of me thinks that the people who are getting killed are classic cases of Darwinism.
 

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Ukraine Range said:
While Toyota is clearly at fault, part of me thinks that the people who are getting killed are classic cases of Darwinism.
Now you're just showing how dumb you are. Most people's wives/girlfriends are not technically savvy or mechanically inclined nor would they anticipate something like this happening, and yet if they were one of those who were a victim here, would you say the same thing?

UK - you need to come off that pedestal you've put yourself on, granted there are many stupid people in the world either by choice or by circumstance or lack of opportunity, but this hardly seems like an accurate assessment of the victims in this case.
 

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PJPR01 said:
Most people's wives/girlfriends are not technically savvy or mechanically inclined nor would they anticipate something like this happening
I think that’s the point. If you are going to get behind the wheel of a 3000lb (5800lb if it’s a RRS) mass of steel, you should know some simple things (like if the engine oil light comes on PULL OVER) and some basic safety points.

The fact is the government will give anybody a license and even if you take the drivers education course, they do not teach any of this.

It’s like SUV drivers not being taught that if they accidentally drive their truck off the highway onto the soft shoulder that in on an angle, to simple break and drive the car down to the bottom and call the tow truck. Most people panic and jerk the wheel back to the direction of the road and ending up rolling across the highway killing themselves and anybody in the car. These are thinks you need to think of BEFORE they happen.

Most drivers don’t even know how to adjust their mirrors properly. How many people check their tire pressure between services (an interval which they usually leave far too long anyway). How many people read the owners manual cover to cover (should be mandatory) where information on emergency shut off is supplied.

While Toyota is fully responsible for the defects in their vehicles, individuals need to take responsibility on educating themselves for any number of issues that can arise when driving a car and should have at least basic knowledge on what it takes to maintain their cars with regards so safety.
 

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As someone who has driven loaner and rental cars many times before, and has sometimes scratched his head for a couple of minutes trying to figure out how to pop the fuel door open at a gas station, I have mentally tried to put myself in the shoes of that "dope" in San Diego: A car I have never driven before (it was a loaner, no?) takes off at 100 mph, gas pedal is stuck, the brakes - this has been confirmed by the investigation - don't do squat, instead of an ignition key there is a cool looking Start/Stop button that doesn't do Golly Gee Whiz when I push it, and as a bonus I am surrounded by screaming family members. Maybe if the car was equipped with this, if I pushed that for at least 3 seconds, if the the brakes interfaced with the throttle and did the other thing, if throwing the shifter in Neutral made any difference... Armchair quarterbacking is easy.
 

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The situation in San Diego regarding somebody in a rental car is an extremely rare case and is not the best one to be used in order to make the point about drive awareness.

If it had been me in that rental car, unfortunately the result probably would have been the same.

The most common cases are people driving there own cars. Since this situation has come up, it would appear that most keyless vehicles can be shut down by either holding the button for three seconds or pressing it repeatedly. This is universal information that anybody who read their owners manual should know.
 

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JetPilot said:
This is universal information that anybody who read their owners manual should know.
It's universal information now that the Toyota debacle has blown up all over the news. Check out early versions of the MY2010 owner's manuals of RRS, LR4, Range Rover, all of them equipped with the new - to Land Rover, anyway - keyless Start/Stop button. The emergency switch off procedure you are speaking of is nowhere to be found. They rushed an addendum to the manual out early this year, but I am not so sure they would have done so had it not been for Toyota (newer prints of the MY2010 manuals have been edited and include this information, but only in North America... MY2010 Owner manuals abroad still simply state to "Never switch off the engine when the vehicle is in motion" and only instruct you to push the Stop button when safely stopped, gear selector in Park.) Actually, I can see how a car manufacturer may want to withhold information from its dumb customers on how it is possible to switch off an engine at the touch of a button while the car is barreling down the highway at high speed. :lol:

Being an old fart, sometimes I wonder about all this gee-whiz technology for technology's sake... Was it really that much of a chore to stick a key in the ignition that made it absolutely necessary for most car companies to come up with these "Look ma, no keys" buttons?
 

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Very well put :lol: I would have to agree with you completely on that point.

Actually, you would be a good person to ask. I was going to wait until I picked up the car but ...

When I test drove the 2010, the salesman showed me that there is an emergency key built into the remote incase the battery in the fob dies. Where does the key go on the car whether to open the door or start it?
 

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I'm assuming it's the key to operate the emergency lock hidden under the plastic cap on the left hand door handle (that's the way it work on earlier model years as well.)
 

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Is there something hidden inside the vehicle so you can actually start it or is it just meant to get you inside so you can stay nice and warm until the the tow truck arrives :doh:
 
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