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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

I have a problem. I want to buy the new Vogue. I love ALMOST everything about the new Vogue diesel V8 but can't seem to get my head around a couple of things that make me question it's suitability for Australian conditions. I'm hoping that if I explain where and how I intend using it some of you more experienced Range Rover owners might be able to throw some light on the validity of my concerns.


My context and declaration of bias:

Firstly, I live in country/state where Toyota reigns supreme. There are dealerships in pretty much every remote town and every second car you pass on a gravel road in the middle of nowhere is a Toyota. I myself currently own the last of the 100 Series diesel Landcruiser Sahara's and have done 200,000km of motoring without any spend outside of the scheduled servicing and tyres etc. In a nutshell, my Toyota has been incredibly reliable and I've driven into the middle of nowhere knowing that if something did fail I could probably have it repaired in the next closest down where it's likely that they would have parts on hand. On the other hand, Range Rover dealers are pretty thin on the ground outside of Perth AND Land Rover vehicles actually have a big reputation for being unreliable

Now, I know that there will be some of you ready (and able) to jump to the defence of the claimed reliability issues that are causing me concern (in truth I want to be persuaded otherwise) I really want to hear from you so hit me with as much as you can tell me here. I know that although my own Toyota hasn't had any problems, Toyotas aren't without fault. I also know through reading endless reviews that many are claiming that the Land Rover reliability issues of the past have seem to be resolved in the current suite of Land Rover models. Is this actually the case? I also know that if I did buy a new 200 series Land Cruiser and it failed it's likely that it would have to be put on a flatbed truck and carried away like any other highly computerised new car. I have also heard that the fine print on the roadside assist offered by Land Rover has also changed and is not as good as before.

My usage pattern: 80% of the year the car is my daily runner - although this only represents about between 30% - 40% of the actual kilometres that I do. The rest of the kilometres are clocked up touring this vast country (towing an offroad camper trailer) - mostly on sealed roads but often (about 10%) on a combination of gravel and sand surfaces. Our unsealed gravel roads are often long and arduous and almost always have very long stretches of corrugation. The driving surfaces are often rough - covered with sharp gravel or rock and are the most common cause of tyre failure. It's the effect of corrugations and road service on the Vogues suspension and tyres that make me most nervous. Experienced drivers in the outback mitigate their risk of suspension and tyre failure by using suitable large(ish) profile AT's that they can deflate just enough on the rough stuff so the tyres themselves absorb much of the impact that would ordinarily carry through to the suspension on a car where the tyres are fully inflated.

It appears that I can't get the Vogue with rims smaller than 20 inch. The dealer also told me yesterday that there is an after market 19 inch rim available for sale but that by using these I'd loose my warranty on related parts of the car.

All of the following links point to reviews that generally rave about the Range Rover. However, every single one of them has something in common - in their testing or usage, ALL of them did a tyre (or two) and a couple of them blew out their rear suspension/shock absorbers

http://www.carmagazine.co.uk/Drives/Search-Results/Long-term-tests/Range-Rover-Vogue-SE-TDV6-2013-long-term-test-review/

http://www.themotorreport.com.au/56963/2013-range-rover-vogue-se-sdv8-off-road-review

http://www.drive.com.au/new-car-reviews/range-rover-vogue-tdv6-outback-road-test-20130816-2s0i5.html

http://www.drive.com.au/motor-news/first-drive-review-2013-range-rover-20121113-2993e.html

http://gibbadventure.blogspot.com.au/

I'm trying my best to convince myself that the V8 diesel Vogue would be suitable to do the driving I like to do. Has anyone with a Range Rover used it in a way similar to way I intend using it. If so, I'd love to get your points of view. Thank you in advance.
 

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All my previous 3 SUVs were Toyotas and my two months old new RRS been in the shop more times than my last 3 SUVs combined. Your mileage may vary but as for matching Toyota reliability, maybe in the next after life you might have a chance of that actually happening. Other than that it's all relative and I think it is the finest SUV on the market today. If you gave all my money back and lined up my old Toyotas and this thing am still taking the range home. Yes even knowing what I know about it..
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply. What are the nature of the problems that you've had with your RRS and do you know if these problems exist with the Vogue Mark IVs?
 

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Common one yes. But I'd guess 2015 will have these fixed. Clunking/loose front suspension if you have the active suspension, blind spot monitors and parking aids that have a mind of their own, AC motor motors humming loudly ( looks like this only happened to me though ), and TPMS malfunction which is us model only issue and minor. Once fixed none of these have returned. The suspension clunk is the most annoying one but they got that figured out too. Silly little things that force you to be on first name basis with the CA at the dealer but once fixed so far so good. From a quality perspective I think It's quite good once you get past these new model issues. The fit and finish and feel is very good and I think you should not fear owning one.

What is with all these punctures? Well low profile tires+clueless drivers off-road = puncture. Not the cars fault there. I have 21s and went off roading and rock crawling with no issues. You don't have to tip toe around sharp edges, but it helps to know how to put those under the tire or in between wheels. I suspect these drivers have been driving quickly and not paying as much attention because it eats up the bad surface so well you might misjudge what you are driving over. In a way it's a complement to the car. Just get the appropriate tires you can do some pretty extreme off-roading with no worries.

Toyota reliability though? Am rooting for JLR but even I must admit they are not there yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Regarding reliability: Thanks for that information. It does seem as though none of the drama's you've have have been insurmountable - By the time I come to ordering one (if that's what I choose to do) delivery will be well into 2015 - meaning that, as you suggested, the bugs may be well ironed out in manufacturing.

Tyres:
I've seen tons of video of the RR's doing amazing things - even when they are fitted with low profile road tyres on large rims. This sort of off-roading isn't the type of off-roading I'd be doing in the Rangie. The problematic off-road we have over here (typically) are the gravel roads that you don't even need an off road car on. They are basically graded gravel roads with small and irregular shaped rock and dirt that form the surface of the road. These roads lend themselves to speeds of between 80-100kmh. Some of them are even gazetted as unsealed major roads (eg. Great Central Road from Laverton to Ayers Rock). The problem is that these roads are pretty corrugated and if you didn't do these speeds (so as to protect the tyres), the car would shake itself to bits as most heavy SUV's need to travel between 80 - 100kmh before they start to "float" over corrugations. Also, reducing this speed isn't really practical as a journey that could be done in 2 days would take you 4. At these faster speeds, on this type of road it's also not normally the side wall that suffers - sharp stones puncture through the grooves in the tread pattern - even on some worn or cheap "off road" tyres which is why we normally deflate - so the tyre has a chance to flex inwards over a sharp rock rather than give the rock a chance to push itself right through. Road tyres don't have a chance. 20 inch rims on the Vogue really limits what you can do to mitigate these issues on these types of roads. The tyre profile prevents deflation and the softer rubber compound used on the road tyres, especially the sportier ones, make them even more susceptible sharp stones. I guess if I could find a proper 20inch tough tyres with a bit of a higher profile owning the Vogue wouldn't be a problem. I have heard of 285/55R20 being put onto a 2013. My only question about this would be how it would effect wheel travel inside the wheel arches...
 

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Your width is going to be the question and only in access height which only stays at that height upto but not past 37mph even if you locked it at that height. My guess is it's a none issue as long as you can get the proper rim size. That wheel well got a whole lot of clearance even in normal height. You might worry what happens during extreme wheel articulation? That is typical rock crawling scenario and even then the wheel leans into the well at an angle and doesn't move straight up. From what you said it's not a thing you do much so really there is nothing to fear.
 
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