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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
today i was on my way to work and when i got off of the interstate i tried to pull away from a light and it was like the car was in neutral. then it started moving a little but felt like the trans was slipping. I have a ILand code reader scan tool that i bought from AB hooked up constantly since it is always throwing codes. I noticed a U0155, P0579, U0146, and of course the lean and rich codes that I can seem to get rid of. I turned the car off and then back on and drove the rest of the way to work no problem. The P0579 has been coming back for a while now and it disables the cruise control until i reset the code. i also have the following codes, all of which can be cleared but they keep coming back.

U0132
U0159
P0182

Really starting to worry i might have bought a lemon...
 

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94 Posts
I don't know that you would call something a lemon that has over 150K miles on it and it throwing some codes. Have you taken it in anywhere ? I wouldnt keep just clearing and ignoring them, something might break and if you keep clearing all the codes your mechanic will have a harder time diagnosing.
 

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LMAO... yea a 12 year old rig with 156K can not be called a lemon. It's called wear and maintenance. So how long have you had this Sport? Did it come with maintenance records? Do you know it's history?
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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10 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
You guys are right. Sorry i was having a moment. I don't know what i was thinking. I expected some things like bags and bushings and links but the number of codes this thing has started throwing still kind of pisses me off when i am making payments...
Ok enough griping. I have no history. I have owned it for about 6 months. Done some minor stuff myself so far with success. I am a DIY'er and prefer to trouble shoot and repair on my own. Had mostly older chevys before so this is a whole new animal for me. I bought the Iland pro from AB and it is pretty helpful.

I had lean bank 1 and 2 so i replaced the MAF sensor and now I have the too lean codes followed by too rich codes. Tried to use the autozone sensor so i guess I am going to have to suck it up and by the OEM one.

I understand it is not good to clear the codes all the time but it disables the cruise control and i spend a lot of time on the interstate and i like cruise control sorry...
Current codes
P0171 Intermittent
P0174 Intermittent
P0155 * Permanent
U0132 Intermittent
U0182 Intermittent
U0159 Intermittent
U0146 Historic
U0073 Intermittent
B1b02 Permanent
B1B85 Intermittent
B1B88 Intermittent
B1C57 Intermittent
B1D12 Intermittent
I understand that historic codes may not represent an immediate concern but should still be considered. Permanent ones I have read that weak batteries can cause gobs of comms bus errors but the voltage is reading 13.7 and the battery is only approximately 3yrs old.

When i crawled under the car to look at the transmission i noticed that both skid plates were missing and one of the stabilizer bars is actually welded to the cross member which is going to make the transmission filter/fluid change slightly more complicated...
Any assistance would be appreciated. 2.jpg 1.jpg
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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10 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
any suggestions on where to start. I am guessing just start at the top and try to whittle away at them. Do any of them look related so that I might target the troubleshooting?
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover Sport
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128 Posts
As it seems like multiple issues are with ECU functions and communications, I would check the battery power, grounding and CAN bus wiring and connectors first.
You say you like to do stuff yourself, but be really careful to get your facts absolutely straight before you do anything significant or it could easily cost you more $$$ to put right than you save from doing it yourself. These vehicles are a whole different level than the old chevvys you say you're used to working on, and often require tools/knowledge that only dealers can get.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover Sport
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106 Posts
Agreed jusniz, I'd take a real good look at the battery, connections and "earth points" (grounds). Range Rovers and Jaguars can throw all kinds of fits when the battery starts getting weaker. You may be able to wipe away a bunch of those codes in one whack.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Discussion Starter #8
thanks for the suggestion.
Are the ground points defined somewhere?
What should the battery voltage be? Do you check it with the car running or no?
What does CAN stand for and what wiring would I need to check?
Sorry for all the basic questions.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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431 Posts
Measure battery with engine off - should be close to 12.6v after charging for at least 30 min drive. Then let it sit overnight and measure again - should not drop that much.

If you are below 12.2v - maybe time to get new battery.

The 13.7v when engine is (at idle?) means alternator is working - but weak battery can still be issue - as can ground issue.

For trans fluid - you can cut out old pan and replace with metal pan - easier to do than jacking engine up to do the job. Look at diys on this site for that.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover Sport
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106 Posts
For trans fluid - you can cut out old pan and replace with metal pan - easier to do than jacking engine up to do the job. Look at diys on this site for that.
Just to clarify what Alpaca is saying, British Atlantic sells a transmission oil filter kit that converts it into a 2-piece unit. The pan/filter and suction tube will be in two pieces and will save you immense hassle in the future. I think removing a header, frame crossmember, and then having to lift the engine off the mounts must rank up there with the all time most ridiculous procedures just to get at the transmission pan.

You simply lower the plastic pan, reach in with a hacksaw to carefully cut the tube and you're ready to install the new transmission consumables.
 
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