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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi
I have an L322 RR MK £ V8 4.4 with 105k on the clock. The issue I2m having is that after driving for 25/30 miles the transmission goes into 2nd or 3rd gear and won't shift up. If I put it into sports mode it will go up to 5th but then shifts down of its own to 2nd/3rd. There is no warning coming up on the dash.
This car had a gearbox overhaul less than 10k ago and has had a new radiator, expansion box, new front caliper, discs and brakes, a new air suspension pump all of which have done less than 10k.
I've had a friend put it on a snapon diagnostic tool and apart from a few minor faults the baffling one is ABS System Intermittent Down.
The car drives lovely until the 25/30 miles mark and then it plays up. I'm thinking the cooling system isn't working or there is some electrical signal being thrown out from a sensor that's causing the transmission to go into this fail safe mode.
Any insight into this would be gratefully received.
TIA.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Phil,
Thanks for the reply. To be perfectly honest I don't know.
 

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LEGACY VENDOR
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The bottom rows of the main radiator getting bunged up with corrosion is the main cause of the transmission overheating but, as the radiator has already been replaced, next on the list for likely cause is the water side of the oil cooler becoming restricted/blocked. If you Google the part number PFD000020 you’ll get an idea of the cost of a replacement (Hella is the OE manufacturer for Land Rover).
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I just went through this on Rover 2. The transmission lower rows were fully blocked. You can diagnose your radiator by following technical service bulletin # LTB00080. See attached.

Also, if you take the radiator out, leave the drain plug in, but block off the lower radiator outlet where the large hose goes, and use a garden hose to flood water down the upper radiator hose connection, you should see a steady, healthy flow of water coming out the bottom port (where the transmission cooler coolant circuit connects to). On mine, there was ZERO flow. Where a new radiator has good flow.

Also, buy a Behr radiator, it’s OEM and has the drain plug, I do not believe the Nissens radiators for our cars have drain plugs!
View attachment LTB00080 High Engine Speeds and-or Shift Problems.pdf
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you MJR. The radiator was replaced 9 months ago.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I'm so sorry, I missed that in your original post. Do you have a diagnostic code reader that can output live data you can view while you're driving? Also, for the trans failsafe prog there should be a stored code in the transmission computer. That exact P code would tell volumes to what might be going on.

I've had great success with the Atlantic British product, iLAND, which can do all of the above and more. I can't speak for GAP diagnostics but have heard good things about that too.
 

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Range Rover MkIII / L322. 2011 SC 5.0 😁
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Same problem here. However I ‘ve put an extra cooler (air) in serie with the original cooler. After I changed the original cooler and thermostat.
reduced the temp with approx. 10 Celsius.The problem is that the rdiator temp of the engine runs with a temp of approx. 100 Celsius. The Gearbox temp is now around 90 Celsius.
287872



287873
 

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Same problem here. However I ‘ve put an extra cooler (air) in serie with the original cooler. After I changed the original cooler and thermostat.
reduced the temp with approx. 10 Celsius.The problem is that the rdiator temp of the engine runs with a temp of approx. 100 Celsius. The Gearbox temp is now around 90 Celsius.
View attachment 287872


View attachment 287873
do you have a writeup detailing how you did this install?
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Great topic and I will definitely check for blockage when I next flush the coolant.

Something to note, the transmission to water heat exchanger is also there to heat the transmission up to operation temperature following startup and in cold conditions. Adding a second heat exchanger to air will only perform the cooling function. Also, placing any additional heat exchanger in front of the existing cooling pack will directly reduce the cooling capability potentially affecting your AC and engine cooling performance.

I can’t speak for the rover application, but when we used this same transmission at Ford, the heat exchanger included a thermostat to avoid over cooling the transmission.

In my opinion, a refreshed OE system would be preferable than adding another heat exchanger. I have done numerous trips to Death Valley in 120F heat fully loaded with a RTT without any issues. I also tow an RV trailer into the Sierras regularly. If you really want to add an additional heat exchanger, consider placing it elsewhere.

Now, if anyone has a solution to relocating the oil cooler that’s in front of the front right wheel on the S/C model, I would be very interested. At this time, it’s the limit to going bigger than 33” tires on my L322.

Thanks for providing the data @Meetpeet. I would be very interested if you had a before and after plot. An interesting observation that reminds me of my time calibrating these transmissions - note that the torque converter clutch never fully locks up. The clutch actually runs in a ‘controlled slip mode’ all of the time, somewhere between 10 and 50 rpm on the applications I worked on. This provides a level of oscillatory isolation (for NVH and to enable the misfire diagnostic) and also saves fuel. The saving fuel by slipping the clutch may seem counter intuitive but it means the internal hydraulic pump does not need to run to anywhere near as high a pressure.
 

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do you have a writeup detailing how you did this install?
Not that difficult. Put the radiator in serie with the heatexchanger which is connected on the radiator.
Put it downstream the original heatexchanger. Otherwise you will heat the oil again😁.

regards,
Peter
 

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The graph was “stolen“ a couple of years ago from an othes side to discuss it with some tech friends. However the graph is the same I read on my RR with the Gap iiD.
 

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Great topic and I will definitely check for blockage when I next flush the coolant.

Something to note, the transmission to water heat exchanger is also there to heat the transmission up to operation temperature following startup and in cold conditions. Adding a second heat exchanger to air will only perform the cooling function. Also, placing any additional heat exchanger in front of the existing cooling pack will directly reduce the cooling capability potentially affecting your AC and engine cooling performance.

I can’t speak for the rover application, but when we used this same transmission at Ford, the heat exchanger included a thermostat to avoid over cooling the transmission.

In my opinion, a refreshed OE system would be preferable than adding another heat exchanger. I have done numerous trips to Death Valley in 120F heat fully loaded with a RTT without any issues. I also tow an RV trailer into the Sierras regularly. If you really want to add an additional heat exchanger, consider placing it elsewhere.

Now, if anyone has a solution to relocating the oil cooler that’s in front of the front right wheel on the S/C model, I would be very interested. At this time, it’s the limit to going bigger than 33” tires on my L322.

Thanks for providing the data @Meetpeet. I would be very interested if you had a before and after plot. An interesting observation that reminds me of my time calibrating these transmissions - note that the torque converter clutch never fully locks up. The clutch actually runs in a ‘controlled slip mode’ all of the time, somewhere between 10 and 50 rpm on the applications I worked on. This provides a level of oscillatory isolation (for NVH and to enable the misfire diagnostic) and also saves fuel. The saving fuel by slipping the clutch may seem counter intuitive but it means the internal hydraulic pump does not need to run to anywhere near as high a pressure.
I had a tow behind the RR of approx. 1700kg. In the Alps it became to hot. Also in the protection mode. We discussed it and checked the gearbox. I decided to put this heatexchanger infront of it all. I know a different RR which has 2 Heat exchangers infront. Working well and towing more than 2000kg in the alps. No problem with other cooling equipment.
The RR was a 4.4 made in 2003. I changed for a younger one. S.C. 2011.:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks to all who have contributed. Just to give you an update the car is with the independent tranny specialist who refurbed the tranny last year. They are going to run it and diagnose live data as the tranny heats up.
So i should have some more info tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Update on this issue and I'm even more baffled :(

Car drove on live data all temperatures within range. The only issue showing up on the diagnostics is the O2 sensors (i haven't got the code yet) on the catalytic converter. I had 2 replaced last year along with a new cat (drivers side) He cleared the codes drove the car for another 10 miles and the codes for the sensors returned. He cleared them again and the car drove fine.

Would this have an effect??

The techinician says the car is lovely to drive and noticed a small lag when hot.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
So I'm going to replace the sensors to see if this rectifies the issue. Process of elimination I guess
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I can’t see how faulty O2 sensors could affect your transmission temperature, if that is what you are asking.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Hi RR876,
That's why I'm baffled, but they think it could be affecting the the signal to the ECU causing an imbalance. As they keep showing up as faulty I'll replace them and see what happens.
I'm sort of convinced that sensors or ECU is playing a part in this as the temperatures are all in within limits on the live data.
Diagnostic's showed no other faults
 
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