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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all.... Hoping you can shed some light on a Transmision fail safe DTC I had today. Basicaly I ended up towing two cars up a hill near where I live today. Got about 8 inches of snow at the moment. When I restarted the car I got a Transmission fail safe pop up. the DTC was 219 'Can time out telematic control unit (TCU)'

Anyone know what on earth this is? it went away on another restart. I was towing a heavy bmw 7 series. I locked gearbox into 2nd. No high rpm or anything. Car coped very well

Car is a 2002 L322 5HP24 box. 77000 miles
 

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You could have a clogged radiator. I'm dealing with the same issue right now, though mine comes on all the time. Waiting on a new radiator right now. I'll let you know if it fixes it. Meanwhile open the radiator drain plug and see if it drains ok. I think in 10 seconds it should drain about 250 ml. If there's barely a stream coming out like mine then get a new radiator.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well I did do a coolant flush in the summer. Funnily enough because I'd read about clogged radiators so I thought a flush might be a good idea. I used the correct BMW fluid. Aside from the rad drain plug being more brittle than a rich tea biscuit it seemed to drain out pretty fast. So not sure it's that in my case.
I was wondering if it got hot towing uphill but i'm sure the box should be more than capable. Wondering if it's a glitch.
 

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Yea I guess it couldve gotten hot towing up the hill but I'm really no expert. Was there blue coolant in it before the flush? Also I would change out the transmission fluid at that mileage.
 

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The transmission cooler pipes are lower than the drain plug, doing. Flush won't clear the sludge at the bottom or if your coolant lines are clogged. Poor design. Get a new rad. Hopefully rrphil sees this topic and can enlighten.....
 

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gw2doc said:
The transmission cooler pipes are lower than the drain plug, doing. Flush won't clear the sludge at the bottom or if your coolant lines are clogged. Poor design. Get a new rad. Hopefully rrphil sees this topic and can enlighten.....
You're right I opened one of those lines new the cooler and there was white stuff around the connector. Going to check them thoroughly when putting the new radiator in. He could have the same problem just at early stage..or it could be something totally different. :|
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well I towed another car today. No gearbox issues so I'm thinking it must have been a glitch. Towed a ford escort up a very steep gradient for about a mile in 14 inch snow. Appart from digging the snow out a couple of times and letting the tyres right down to get going again it didn't miss a beat.
 

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Locky said:
Well I towed another car today. No gearbox issues so I'm thinking it must have been a glitch. Towed a ford escort up a very steep gradient for about a mile in 14 inch snow. Appart from digging the snow out a couple of times and letting the tyres right down to get going again it didn't miss a beat.
Get a job with the AA/RAC and start getting paid... :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yeah tell me about it.... I towed a loaded long wheelbase Mercedes Sprinter van out today. Just seem to keep finding these situations. Coincidently what are your thoughts on the ratio that should be used when towing in snow? I've towed everything in high range so far as it's on snow and you don't want too much torque. Was a bit worried how robust the 1st gear is in the gearbox to towing a lot of weight and rocking the car a lot to get moving.
I guess low range could give a very slow speed to get moving on snow though.
 

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I think there is a bit of confusion in this and other threads discussing correct gear ratios for snow and torque.

People are discussing Torque as if it equals power. ie Lower gears/ratios equals more torque and therefore more slip.

Torque is all about Moment of Force or "Momentum" and being able to maintain it. Think generally of levers or a say heavy Flywheel being spun quickly/forcefully once and the force/momentum generated being sufficient to carry a car uphill without further spinning or power from an engine.

Torque is a force that turns, twist or rotates. The spinning crankshaft of the engine thus creates torque. Torque is defined as force multiplied by distance.

Torque is what you get lots of from say low revving big Diesel engines (Such as Buses, Coaches, Ships & TDV8 :wink: ) and the more Torque the engine has the easier it is to go up a hill in high gear at low revs. In other words driving using the "Torque" availability of your car in Snow/Ice involves driving in a higher than usual gear and letting the low rev "Torque/Momemtum of Force" of the engine keep you going up or down a hill without revving further thus keeping much better control than the complete opposite (and frankly foolish) low ratio additional "Power" at the drive wheels which you do not want or need at all.

That's the secret to winter driving in hazardous conditions - use maximum Torque/Momentum where available and minimum Revs/BHP/Power.

Hope that's clear as there seems to be maximum confusion on the subject and a bit of knowledge may well potentially save lives.



Prof. G. :think:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
So am I right in thinking the difference between high and low ratio is only a hp difference at the wheels. Torque remains the same.
 

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Locky said:
So am I right in thinking the difference between high and low ratio is only a hp difference at the wheels. Torque remains the same.
Nope, it’s the other way around. The additional reduction ratio engaged by Low Range increases the output torque by a factor of 2.69 and reduces the output speed by a factor of 2.69 – the power remains the same. The driveline just transmits the engine power to the wheels – and engine power is engine power, irrespective of the gear ratio.

It's important to remember that the product of the torque converter stall torque ratio, 1st gear ratio and the final drive ratio is sufficient to break traction, even in perfect road conditions, in high range. Low range is really all about low speed control, not torque multiplication.

Phil
 
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