RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Alright, so I recently hit 75,000 miles in my 2012 RR HSE and brought it to the dealer to have the 75,000 mile service done, including changing the transfer case fluid. After getting the car home I noticed a popping/gear skipping/binding noise when taking low-speed tight turns. I immediately suspected transfer case so I brought the car back to the dealer and they agreed that the transfer case was binding. They then performed a re-calibration of the transfer case clutches. The car seemed alright after this but I have started to notice that it is binding again while taking tight turns, although not yet as bad as before. Has anyone experienced a similar issue? I brought the car in 100% healthy and have never had any sort of issue with the transfer case on this car.
 

·
Registered
2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Just an update: they once again re-calibrated the transfer case clutches and it is working correctly for now. They said that the clutches are worn and if the problem reoccurs they will recommend replacing the transfer case. I am still skeptical that there is not something else going on here given that the issue began right after what should have been a routine service and reoccurred within weeks after the re-calibration. Possibilities running through my head are either incorrect fluid (the rear diff was also serviced during the same visit), or incorrect fluid level, but both of those seem egregious.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Wow! if anything new fluid should have less friction and result in less binding. Sounds like you have the wrong fluid. There are a few things that can contribute to shudder/shutter/binding/crow hop/crop hop on low speed tight turns. Transfer case is obvious but rear locking differential or wrong sized / unevenly worn tires can cause it as well. My problem flow chart looks a bit like this, others might have a better approach.

1) Does your receipt show the correct part numbers for the transfer case fluid and rear differential if you have rear locking
Transfer case: LRN0753 / IYK500010 / IYK500010OE
Rear Diff: LR019727 (Castrol Bot 720)

2) Is it worth the hassle of verifying that you have the correct fluids in both (assuming rear locking) by having the fluids analyzed by a lab and doing it in a manner that the dealership agrees is unbiased knowing that the implications of a test result showing incorrect fluid will result in them likely replacing that unit. ie. have mechanic collect sample directly from transfer case and rear diff, put in clean uncontaminated bottle. Pour new fluids into other bottles and send directly to a lab via courier from the dealership. Have results sent to both of you and proceed accordingly. My guess is approx $100-$150. This will either give you peace of mind knowing they didn't make a mistake or if they did, they should assist in remedying. You should leave truck at dealer while you wait for results.

3) If it's not worth that hassle and you are not willing to do the work yourself then proceed with flushing. If you have a rear locker, have they gone through a procedure to identify which one is binding? If so, have them change that fluid. If not, dump both. Drive it and then have them do it again.

If you are willing to do the work yourself it's a fairly simple job that can be done in a couple of hours. Flush and fill both transfer case and rear diff if you have locking. There is a GM service procedure for dealing with binding clutches in the transfer case. It's easier than changing engine oil with the exception that you need a hand held transfer pump ($15 at local parts store). In my experience, if it's the rear diff, it clears as soon as you put the right fluid in. The Transfer case needs a flush.
Get 5 litres of the correct fluid (LRN0753 / IYK500010 / IYK500010OE) - Dealer should sell it to you for at least what you can find it for online you would think...
Drain and fill transfer case
Drive vehicle to warmup and then tight turns in figure 8s to cause the transfer case to bind a bit. This should flush junk from the clutches.
Drain and fill transfer case, repeat
Drain and fill last time. Hopefully problem goes away.
I've had to do this myself on two different vehicles and in both cases fixed the issue.

These folks compiled the transfer case shudder tsbs from GM that applied to their AWD transfer cases that use clutches similar to LRs. The problem is the same, clutches sticking.
 

·
Registered
2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Yeah I am definitely leaning towards the fluids being wrong. I can already start to feel it binding again so I'm going to take it into a different shop and have them check it out. I'll make sure they check the fluids and I have no problem paying for an analysis if need be.
 

·
Registered
2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
So I had another dealer do an analysis of the fluids in both the rear diff and transfer case. They said that the rear diff fluid was correct and had no issues. The transfer case fluid was also the correct fluid but it was full of metal shavings. They said that changing the fluid can occasionally cause any underlying issues to suddenly cause a failure, which I have heard about high mileage transmissions but I didn't think that would be a concern for my 75,000 mile transfer case. Looks like I will need to bite the bullet and get it replaced. My last range rover also started to have transfer case issues around the 95,000 mile mark but I assumed that was because I had not changed the fluid. Not sure what I am doing to prematurely kill these supposedly reliable transfer cases.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top