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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2010 RR HSE (not sport) has a trailer hitch installed by the factory but where the female receiver square hole is WAY to far under the rear bumper to attach a trailer or anything. If i install my standard male receiver the ball is still basically under the bumper. I can't seem to find if an adapter is needed to bring the female part of the hitch out to slide the male receiver in or if i just order some type of long receiver. Autoparts stores were also no help...

I definately want to do some towing so i don't want to give up the capacity of the tongue weight, etc.

Can I get some advise please? Even Rover parts didn't seem to get what i was saying when i called them...

Thank you in advance!
 

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RIP Our Friend
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Range Rovers since 1995 have all taken longer hitches. There is no adapter you simply need a longer hitch to go in the factory receiver. This is nothing new and any dealer, LR supplier or even UHaul will have longer hitches in stock. Your bigger issue is that you should match the rise of your tow ball to the trailer you are towing. Again, any trailer/RV supply or UHaul will have stock items on the shelf.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I bought a similar one from Harbor Freight, but found it stuck out to far, so I shoved it all the way into the receiver until the larger part of the extension tube almost touched the receiver tube, then I marked and drilled 2 new 5/8" diameter holes in the extension at the markings. That pulls that extension so that its just about flush with the back of the bumper, and then you can use any normal ball hich that you want. I went with one of those 90 degree jobs that allows me to raise or lower the hitch height as needed. My Barefoot Nautique trailer rails are 24" off the ground when level, and thats just about at the top of the rear bumper so I needed something with more offset than your normal 2" to 6" hitches, and even with the truck lifted (obviously cant drive on the roads that way) the trailer still tipped down toward the bumper. Make sure you get a real 5/8" pin for your hitch though because the cheaper ones are metric and are slightly undersized, and they tend to make the whole hitch rattle around in the receiver tubes and they make all kinds of noises going down the road.
 

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Please folks, just purchase the correct item with the correct rating for the job. Extensions are great for stowage baskets and bike racks but are rarely rated for actual towing.

Mark brought up two important items additional drilling and ball rise. Additional drilling can weaken your hitch ball. Do so at your own risk and the safety of others. I am not saying it can;t be done, I am saying it is risky at best depending on how close you are drilling to the existing holes and distance from the receiving end. Ball rise, your trailer should be level at all times. Purchase and install the correct item to match your trailer. Again this is a huge safety and handling issue.

I have an assortment of hitches in my garage. Classics take a stubby little ball mount as the receiver is right at the rear of the truck. P38s recessed a bit further and take an 8" mount. As you folks have noticed the L322 is mounted even further back to increase departure angle. The L322 takes a 12" hitch/ball mount. I think one of mine is actually a 13". All of these are standard 2" drop mounts.

Again folks, for items like bike racks, steps etc an extension is okay. If you are actually towing please install the correct item with correct rating. The correct 12" hitch with 6000 pound rating is usually under $50. It is worth it to not do things correctly and safely?
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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In my case, both my 12" extension and my hitch are rated at 5000 lbs, and the distance from my drilled hole to the original hole in the extension peice actually exceeds the distance from the original hole to the back edge of the extension tube. The receiver is rated for 7700 lbs and my boat weights 2800 lbs and is only towed locally (20 miles or so) so I'm not really worried about the new hole weakening the extension any as there are no new forces being exerted on it.

My real purpose for purchasing the extension was so i could use one of those little 2 foot by 4 ft storage basket things so I wouldn't have to put my leaf bags in the back of the truck when I go to the dump. But I actually couldn't even get it into the receiver tube without the edge of it hitting the bumper so I needed something to push it back some. The basket is only rated at 500 pounds, but the front edge sat about 8 or 10" away from the bumper when I used the extension in its original configuration, so I shortened it down a bit by relocating the holes. Don't know if I would tow the boat long distance with this setup yet or not and I certainly wouldn't tow anything heavier than my boat with it. Have see how it holds up locally first. Don't forget that a 3/4" shank ball is only rated for 3500 lbs and a 1" shank ball is rated for 5000 lbs so thats something else to watch when your buying trailer hitch parts. Of course none of this matches the restrictions printed right on the receivers by Land Rover about length and rise or drop restrictions which limits you to 11" of length (hitch pin to centerline of trailer ball and no more than 2 1/2" of rise. (its right on the tag on your receiver)
 

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2007 HSE
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389 Posts
Got at Amazon: CURT 45260 Class III 2" Ball Mount

12+ inches long, rated to 7500 lbs, $26.18 at the moment. Works well.

I also got the CURT 40037 2 In. Diameter Chrome Trailer Ball, currently $14.28.

Never a problem with either, and both are appropriate to the tow ratings.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I have one of those, and even it I put it on upside down so it has about a 2" lift instead of being a stright hitch that places my ball about at the lower edge of my rear bumper which is somewhere around 18" above the ground. My trailer is 24" high to the top of the frame rails, which means my trailer dips down 6" or so between the wheels and the hitch and tows nose down. Direct drive inboard trailers tend to be kind of high to keep the running gear of the boat off the road or launching ramp) I need to get the ball out past the bumper an up almost level with the top of the rear bumper to tow level which is something like a 10" lift hitch.
 

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I bought my extension from Harbor Freight too, but the one I got for about $25 fits perfect, and I've pulled some middling heavy trailers with it too.
The 3-ball tow hitch I use is from there too.
U haul trailers, 16 ft long, closed and open, reasonably loaded at highway speeds, with no problems.
I bought the Harbour Freight locking hitch pins, and they are still fine too.

But Toadhall has a good point, the right tool for the job is never bad advice.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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694 Posts
I usually pull the pin, pull the receiver out as far as I can while keeping it in the hole, connect the trailer, then back up until I can put the pin back in.

I dare say I have towed more with my RR than 90 percent of owners ever will :)

ALSO, consider that the further out the hitch is, the more leverage the trailer has on the truck. Not a good thing.
 

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I bought a similar one from Harbor Freight, but found it stuck out to far, so I shoved it all the way into the receiver until the larger part of the extension tube almost touched the receiver tube, then I marked and drilled 2 new 5/8" diameter holes in the extension at the markings. That pulls that extension so that its just about flush with the back of the bumper, and then you can use any normal ball hich that you want. I went with one of those 90 degree jobs that allows me to raise or lower the hitch height as needed. My Barefoot Nautique trailer rails are 24" off the ground when level, and thats just about at the top of the rear bumper so I needed something with more offset than your normal 2" to 6" hitches, and even with the truck lifted (obviously cant drive on the roads that way) the trailer still tipped down toward the bumper. Make sure you get a real 5/8" pin for your hitch though because the cheaper ones are metric and are slightly undersized, and they tend to make the whole hitch rattle around in the receiver tubes and they make all kinds of noises going down the road.
I did the same for when I use my bike rack. However doing so reduces the rated tongue weight by nearly half, so for my 23' center console boat I purchased a long (11" or 12") hitch from my local trailer shop.
 
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