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Hello and good Sunday to you all.

Real life scenario here. I know there are a lot of individuals who tow 5000 lbs with there RRS with no problem and actually think it’s a great towing vehicle.


I will be going on a 2.5 week trip from Lake Tahoe to Sedona to Durango and back to Tahoe in the spring and am making arrangements for that trip- will be going over many mountain passes in Nevada, California, Utah and Colorado.


I am in a bit of a conundrum and am seeking advice here as my local dealer has basically zero experience with regards to towing and I am new at this as well.


As much as I WANT to bring MY17 RRS HSE SC Dynamic, I am not sure it can handle the job safely.

RRS HSE Dynamic:

HP: 380
Torque: 332 lbs-ft.
Max Tongue weight: 770 lbs.
Max Towing: 7700 lbs.
Max Payload: 1775 lbs. (not 100% about his number- just a google search)


Grand Design 2150RB:

Length: 26’9”
UVW: 5295 lbs.
GVWR: 6695 lbs.
Hitch Weight: 427 lbs.
RRS is capable of towing 7700. This leaves 1005lbs safety margin if we are looking at just GVWR.

Now, the weight of my myself, my wife plus a 100lb German Shepherd is right around 400lbs.

I will have 2 full tanks of propane on the camper = an extra 40 lbs. + battery (30 lbs.)

Correct me if I’m wrong, but the payload of the RRS is 1770 lbs. So I am good there.


Max Tongue Weight for RRS = 770. Camper hitch weight is 427lbs + 40 lbs. (2 propane tanks) + 30 lbs (battery) = 497 lbs. Looks like I would be good here with a margin of safety of 270 lbs.

Max Tow is 7700. I am not sure if I need to include the weight of my wife, the dog and I in this figure. If I don’t then I’m good by a margin of 700 lbs. If not, then I am cutting it close by a margin of 300 lbs. which means I would have to run the trailer with a light load IF I decided to use the RRS.

Also, I have a real nice EZ WD hitch... but my understanding is that I wouldn't use it on a RRS with the air suspension. This seems counter intuitive as far as sway control... but I'm not sure.


To put things in perspective, I have a 2004 Toyota 4 Runner 4.7 liter iforce V8 that I have towed the trailer with and I can say that it tows ok… but not great (45 mph going over passes here in the Sierras) It’s rating is 7300 lbs., but it’s 14 years old with 150k miles on it. I will be selling this vehicle and either tow with the RRS or buy a 1/2 or 3/4 ton pickup (I’d rather not do this).

Any help from people who know how to add up towing capacities would be extremely useful here as I feel that I might be getting close to maxing out the RRS towing capabilities, but maybe I’m well within spec.

Thanks in advance.

2150RB Double axl:


2150rb.jpg

 

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I have a 2014 HSE, pulley and tune putting out 400 hp so similar to your setup. I have towed from the Bay Area to Fallon Raceway, Nevada which is past Reno. My total rig setup is around 5500 lbs not including supplies. It's not as heavy as yours, but I had no problems going 60-65mph up the grade on highway 80. The setup towed straight and true with no sway. I have a wd hitch but didn't use it. You should be fine.

P1010994_zps6457ec7d.JPG
 

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Every vehicle has an exact max payload weight permitted for that specific vehicle. Land Rover places that plate in the front driver's side door, usually between the front and rear door. It takes into account all options and extras ordered with the vehicle. It includes full fuel but no occupants or cargo.
 

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You should have no issues towing your 27' trailer provided you've gotten things setup correctly and drive reasonably. My wife and I travel full-time in our 28' Airstream trailer, and I've towed with my 2017 RRS SC Dynamic over 4500 miles in the past 8 months over countless mountain passes through WA, ID, MT, CO, UT, AZ, and CA. The Airstream weighs approximately 7200lbs. fully loaded, with a tongue weight at the vehicle rated limit. Going up steep mountain passes, the SC V8 provides ample power to easily pass large transport trucks, and coming back downhill I pop down a few gears with the paddle shifters to control descent speeds and occasionally tap the brakes on straight sections. In gusty windy conditions, I engage Dynamic mode to stiffen the steering and suspension to keep things tight.

I haven't driven with the SC V6 engine, so I can't comment if that would be adequate, but there is a good amount of torque on-paper, and I believe that it's effectively the same engine design as the SC V8 but with two fewer pistons. Not towing I get between 21 and 24 mpg, and towing I get between 12.5 and 14.5 mpg. I typically tow between 55 and 65mph, depending on the conditions.

Some tips:
- Make sure you've setup the shank height such that the trailer is level to the ground. The air suspension will automatically level the trailer tongue on the vehicle, but the rear of the trailer may in fact not be level with the front. This means that you need to adjust the shank height to ensure everything is level.
- Ensure you've loaded the trailer evenly side-to-side and back-to-back, and fill your fresh & dump your grey/black tanks before towing long distances. This will avoid sway introduced by uneven loads or sloshing fluids. Don't underestimate the effect that 500lbs. of sloshing fluids and solids in half-full grey/black tanks have on sway.
- Change the stock trailer tires from ST to LT. We use Michelin Defender LTX tires on our Airstream, upgraded from Goodyear Marathon ST. The stock tires spec'd on trailers are terrible and prone to surprise blowouts. Bonus points for having a wireless TPMS system on your trailer tires. In our travels we've seen multiple trailers blow their crappy ST tires (can easily spot ST tires based on the sidewall and tread pattern) right in-front of us and we had to flag down the drivers as they didn't notice the blowout.
- Invest in a solid WD hitch (BlueOx SwayPro, Equalizer, etc.) and a good brake controller (Tekonsha P3).
- Get proper trailer mirrors such that you can see the sides of your trailer AND at the ground. Very helpful when maneuvering around tight campgrounds! We use the "Grand Aero 3" mirrors, which retain functionality for the side cameras and blind spot monitoring as it clips to the top.

M10A1481.jpg
M10A5396.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #8
So glad to see someone who tows 7k with no problems. Thanks for your very informative response.

It seems like you have no problems using a WD hitch. I have the equalizer WD hitch which is awesome, but I have slight concerns of using it with the RRS as some have mentioned that Land Rover does not recommend WD hitches with their air suspensions.
 

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lcd32bit,
Beautiful pics and useful tips, thanks for sharing. Which WDH are you using? Does it also have anti-sway? Do you have a specific process for setting up the WDH? Do you disable the automatic leveling system when setting up the WDH? Your RRS looks very level.
jeb3
 

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LR, who is based in the UK, have no idea about WD hitches as towing standards in the Euro region are ancient compared to the rest of the world. WD hitches are illegal in most parts of the EU, and electrically controlled brake controllers are just starting to be used there. LR dealers in NA know nothing about towing, so don't bother asking them. Most folks just end up with pickup trucks to perform towing duties, but a properly setup LR can tow reasonably sized trailers just fine, like they do in the Euro region.

The hitch receiver itself is strong and welded to the unibody with reinforcements, so it can handle the WD just fine. I wouldn't go and try to transfer 500lbs to the front wheels, but transferring 1/3 of the max 770lbs tongue weight wouldn't be a stretch. (a properly setup WD hitch transfers 1/3 of the tongue weight to the front axle of the TV, 1/3 to the rear axle, and 1/3 to the trailer axles)

If the sticker on the vehicle does not specifically recommend against using WD hitches, I would not worry. Current and prior model year vehicles have the standard 7700/770 weights for both WD and no WD. Some after market hitches specifically recommend against using WD, however.
 

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I have towed my boat about 3,000 miles over the last two years. It is around 6,500 pounds when fully loaded. I have the TD6 engine and I have only had two times where I was limited to 60 mph on a pass. All the other passes were 65 mph without a problem. My towing has been CA, OR WA and ID. I generally tow around 65 mph on good roads and occationally 70 mph on a freeway. I also always check the trailer tire pressure when going longer distances and have good tires on my trailer and good brake (surge brakes). I have not used extensions on my mirrors but I have recently purchased some but have not tried them out yet. They will definitely help. I did a 2,000 mile trip from Northern CA to North Idaho and averaged a bit over 16mpg on that trip with substantially all the driving at about 65 mph. I have done that same trip in the past with the same boat using a Yukon Denali with the 6.2L V-8 and averaged just over 9 mpg. The RR Sport TD6 was better in pretty much every way (quieter, smoother acceleration, more comfortable).
 

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I have towed my boat about 3,000 miles over the last two years. It is around 6,500 pounds when fully loaded. I have the TD6 engine and I have only had two times where I was limited to 60 mph on a pass. All the other passes were 65 mph without a problem. My towing has been CA, OR WA and ID. I generally tow around 65 mph on good roads and occationally 70 mph on a freeway. I also always check the trailer tire pressure when going longer distances and have good tires on my trailer and good brake (surge brakes). I have not used extensions on my mirrors but I have recently purchased some but have not tried them out yet. They will definitely help. I did a 2,000 mile trip from Northern CA to North Idaho and averaged a bit over 16mpg on that trip with substantially all the driving at about 65 mph. I have done that same trip in the past with the same boat using a Yukon Denali with the 6.2L V-8 and averaged just over 9 mpg. The RR Sport TD6 was better in pretty much every way (quieter, smoother acceleration, more comfortable).
@kdg we just purchased a 2017 RRS HSE TD6, and have a similar trailer weight. I know LR does not recommend weight distribution hitches, but I'm curious what you use? We have a weight distribution hitch from the truck we had previously, but the length of the WDH is longer than what the LR manual recommends. We want to be safe, but have never towed without a WDH set up. Would love to know what set up you've used, and if you used a trailer brake as well. Thanks!
 
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