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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

I currently own a 2004 L322 and I absolutely love it. Its a beast of a car and so far I have used it for almost anything you can think of. Recently I decided to change the timing guides. It involves taking apart a large portion of the engine components and I decided to also change the main timing chain, water pump, steering pump and fuel injectors (I might be missing something else). Anyways, after changing the timing chain and guides I go through the timing procedure using the timing kit (i.e. cam blocks). Every single guide I have found on doing this states that the square boss at the end of the cam shafts should be facing up showing the cylinder numbers 1-4 and 5-8 (TDC position) such that the timing blocks from the timing kit can slide to lock them in place. My problem is that only 3 out of 4 cam shafts face perfectly up while one is slightly offset. This is a problem because the timing kit blocks will not correctly set in place. The interesting part is that I only replaced the large chain while the original smaller chains were left untouched. Therefore unless I am missing something here it is not possible for the camshafts to move apart from each other while the smaller chain remains in place holding them together. So in theory, the current orientation of the cam shafts is the same as before I started this procedure when the vehicle was running fine, right?

This is my second attempt at trying to time the engine. My first attempt failed because when I used the multimeter to check for connectivity and confirm the timing it did not show connectivity. I suspect that it might have to do with the one camshaft being off slightly?

Any thought on this? Is it normal for one camshaft to be slightly off? If so, how do I proceed with the timing sequence if one of the timing kit blocks does not perfectly sit against the engine (due to the offset of one of the cam shafts)?

Any help on this matter would be greatly appreciated. I have attached pictures showing the situation.

Thanks in advance!

IMG_20181228_201341[1].jpg IMG_20181228_201413[1].jpg IMG_20181228_202216[1].jpg IMG_20181228_202030[1].jpg
 

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Registered
2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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169 Posts
You need to use an open 27mm wrench to turn the intake cam on bank 1. It's often offset because of the Vanos. Use the wrench to bring it into alignment so that you can put the cam lock blocks on.

As for the continuity test, it doesn't always work on every vehicle. I never really bothered with it, I just turn the Vanos unit fully counterclockwise until it stops using the special tool.
 

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I remember my camshafts being exactly like yours in that picture when doing my timing chains and guides. On the camshaft there should be a hex for a wrench so that you can rotate the camshafts. You will need to put a wrench on that camshaft and rotate it counter-clockwise so that the timing blocks can fit, there should be enough slack in the cam chains so that exhaust cam won't move when you do this. When you take the timing blocks out after replacing the chain, guides and setting the timing the camshaft will rotate back to as they are in the picture and that is normal. One of my VANOS units didn't show continuity either but i followed the repair manual exactly using a torque wrench and everything worked out.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Go to the sticky section and download RAVE and follow the procedure. Only change I would add is to when doing the continuity test - focus more on using a torque measurement (I think it is 40nm counter clockwise (if you search you will find the BMW official update which provides the exact spec)) rather than the continuity check.

Other item to focus on is removing chain slack on Bank 2 first (driver side) - this is important and is listed in the procedure.

Final tip is to use the upper cam cover alignment hole to double check your tools when setting the trigger wheel. No need to install the gasket - just align the cover with the block and secure with a few screws.

As to your question, the valve springs (not the Vanos) cause the cams to rotate when the blocks are removed. So, when the chains are still loose, put the blocks on and get the blocks perfectly flat by using the 27mm open wrench to turn the cams (it will only be a few degrees one way or the other). Again, chains must be loose. Blocks must be flat.

Last - take that sensor holder off that is showing in your picture and any other item which will restrict the blocks from sitting flat. Then make sure the cam squares are pointing up and properly seated in the blocks. The blocks will lie flat, but when you rotate the cams they will want to lift. I used Irwin clams to hold the blocks flat as my kit didn't have the holders that screw into the spark plug well. You can get by without either, but before calling it good and finalizing exhaust and intake cam bolt final torque - make sure they are still lying flat. It takes wiggling back and forth with the 27mm and pushing/holding the blocks.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ok. Reporting back! After doing the timing procedure I confirmed it by turning the crank a couple of times, putting the timing blocks on again and confirming that with the trigger wheel tool the timing was still the same. Then, assuming it was all good, I continued to assemble the rest of the engine. The bad news is that I cannot get it to start... The engine cranks just fine, but it does not want to start. The first time it cranked it seemed to start for a few seconds, but was struggling and rpms were low and fluctuating. Then it shut off. After that, when it cranks but it does not turn on anymore. It seems as if there was no spark or fuel because I cannot hear any combustion during ignition - just the starter turning. I tried starter fluid too and there was no change. I pulled one spark plug out and confirmed that there was spark (visual confirmation). I also assume that there is good fuel pressure because if I depress the fuel pressure relief valve on the fuel rail it squirts like crazy. In fact, the first time I mounted the intake manifold after redoing the timing an injector was not properly set and when I tried to start the engine it squirted all over. I had to pull it out and fix the rubber o-ring and then put it back in (no more leaks after that). There is battery power because it cranks just fine and accessories run.

Summary:

- The engine was running ok before this. I was just doing preventative maintenance =(

1. I am assuming that the timing is correct. How can I confirm this?
2. One spark plug (#5) seems to spark. Did not check the rest. They all worked before all this.
3. There seems to be plenty of fuel in the rail (pressure relief valve confirms this).
4. Also tried starter fluid without seeing any change. When i pulled the spark plugs out to do the compression test they were wet and I could smell the fuel all over them.


I also did a compression test and the numbers are extremely low:
1. 90 psi
2. 60 psi
3. 80 psi
4. 90 psi

5. 60 psi
6. 70 psi

- I did not continue after seeing how low they were... Clearly there is something wrong.

- Is this due to improper timing? - When I crank the engine there are no metal noises, but maybe improper timing would cause these low compression values and no ignition?

- Could this be due to bent valves? - I took the intake manifold out again and visually inspected the intake valves as I manually rotated the crankshaft. They look fine and not bent, but I cannot see the exhaust valves from there so I cannot confirm these being ok. Is there any easy way to rule this out?

- I will check the rest of the spark plug just to be sure.


Not sure what to do next...
 

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Whatever you do, DO NOT keep cranking. Fuel wash is a serious matter with the M62tu, and so excessive fuel in the cylinders can severely damage the engine.

Those are extremely low numbers. You're sure the engine was locked in at top dead center with the included tool? Second, try taking the plugs out and putting a bit of oil into the cylinders, then do the compression test again.
 

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I would not put 100% in a compression test on a cold, DRY engine that's been sitting, not saying it's wrong, but I've had bad numbers on a cold engine that was sitting, then once I got it running did several other checks (hot and warm) and they all came back in spec. IMO, I'd pull the covers, LOCK the crank at TDC with the PIN-TOOL, install all the locks to RECHECK the cam timing. If this is good, AND you previously did not turn the crank, or rotate a cam with the main chain off, then I would not think you have any bent valves. Then i'd remove the Crank Pin and locks, DISABLE THE FUEL PUMP, then I'd pour some Mystery Oil into each cylinder hand crank the engine over several times, then do another compression test and leak down. IMO, I would not do anything else until I re-verified my CAM/Crank timing.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Don't forget to do your compression checks with the ignition and fuel pump disabled, and the throttlebody locked wide open, otherwise you get lower than normal readings.
 

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Not sure if you have resolved your problem - I have done the procedure about 4 times on 3 different vehicles and it can be a pain when things dont go your way. I purchased the germanautosolutions com tool set - they have a great step by step procedure on their site that i use when doing it. It should still apply with your tool set. Also beisansystems com has great info regarding vanos rebuilding and engine reassembly/timing after rebuilding vanos which i also have done to my my l322 and my 540i which also utilizes the same engine. Im sure your engine is fine. There is another way to verify your timing with the timing cover access holes they should line up with the cam shaft timing wheel holes, if everything is in sync.
 

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You need to use an open 27mm wrench to turn the intake cam on bank 1. It's often offset because of the Vanos. Use the wrench to bring it into alignment so that you can put the cam lock blocks on.

As for the continuity test, it doesn't always work on every vehicle. I never really bothered with it, I just turn the Vanos unit fully counterclockwise until it stops using the special tool.
This is spot on advice. I too did not have continuity when I reinstalled the Vanos units, but this is very common.
 

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I second or third that? - I disregard the continuity test (i think its over the top stupid) its never been a problem. The largest pain to me is the valve covers, making sure the front timing covers are seated correctly so as the valve covers are flush - pain in the butt. I know this does not add to the timing issue but I needed to vent, im getting flashbacks.... How is it going, did you figure it out?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ok guys. I pulled the valve covers again to check timing. I aligned the crankshaft marks (OT) and looked at the cam shafts. The square boss at the end of each shaft is pointing up (perpendicular to the engine surface) except for the intake cam shaft for cyl 1-4 which has the offset. When I did the timing I had to rotate the shaft counter clockwise with an open 27mm wrench to align it with the others so that the timing blocks would slide in. When I took the blocks out the shaft rotated back again to the original offset (clockwise). The dots on the shafts are also pointing up and the square boss of each shaft has the cylinder numbers written on them pointing up too and the lobes on both cam shafts for cyl 1-4 are pointing up and towards each other like they should. This is exactly how I left it after re-timing it last week. This is as far as I can check without pulling the rest of the engine covers out. With this I am assuming that the timing is good.

Next I added some oil to each cylinder through the spark plug hole. I cranked it manually a couple of times and then through the starter with the fuel pump fuse out. I then performed another compression test and the numbers jumped to around 170-190 psi for all cylinders. I then put the rest of the engine back together again wired it and proceeded to start it with the pump fuse back on. Now the engine starts for about 1-2 seconds like it would normally and it then dies. I also tried starting it flooded and the engine revs as expected but dies after 1-2 seconds! I also notice that I put too much oil on the cylinders because I get a lot of white smoke from the exhaust the after second or third try.

Any thoughts? - Not sure what to do next.
 

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Glad to see the numbers went up. You are on the right path. Assuming the timing is right as you confirmed, and it is getting spark and air, I would check fuel supply. You removed the fuse for the fuel pump and later you put it back in. I don’t know how many times you cranked it afterwards but I would like to think the fuel pressure is not where it needs to be yet causing it to stall.
 

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As stated above, make sure you have plenty of fuel in the tank, and I'd also check the fuel pressure with a gauge. This sounds like my engine when the FP died....not sayin that's your prob, but you need to rule out insufficient fuel pressure via a gauge, and NOT watching the fuel spray out the nozzle...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Another update - I had the feeling that I was having wiring issues too because the time between startup and shutdown was always almost the same. This was followed with 15 OBD codes! So I went back looked through the wiring and switched two identical 2 pin connectors around: the driver VANOS solenoid and what looks like a vacuum pressure sensor of some sort that also sits on the driver side. The connectors were identical - extremely stupid decision from BMW I must say - I could not find an schematic of which connector went with what so i guessed. Anyways, after the connector switch the engine started up without turning off. The idle is extremely rough with the engine almost trying to shut down at some points (is struggling). I am thinking that this is because I put too much oil into some cylinders. I am generating a LOT of white smoke. Is there any easy way to get rid of the from the cylinders? Instead of just burning it I was thinking about trying to suck it up with a flexible tube through the spark plug.

Thanks!
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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Rev it. If the problem is indeed the oil you put in the cylinders, it should burn off quick enough. Hopefully before fouling the plugs

Martin
 

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Glad to hear that you figured it out! Such a relief when things finally go right. I agree with the post above. You have to rev it to burn the oil. If you are able to suck it via the spark plug holes, great but you will still have to burn off the residual off the walls. If you are in a residential area where your neighbors will complain or will dial emergency on you, you should tow it out somewhere secluded and run the h*** out of it. Ask me if I've got any related story to share lol
 

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You could remove the spark plugs and crank the engine with rags over the openings, that will vacate liquid in the cylinders.
 

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You could remove the spark plugs and crank the engine with rags over the openings, that will vacate liquid in the cylinders.
I think I would rather do less cranking at this point since he has been cranking that engine too much already during this whole process but just my opinion of course. M62TU cylinder walls are fragile.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I have been starting the engine multiple times now to see if the smoke would go away, but It hasn't. The smoke is thick and white. It usually takes like 30 seconds after starting the engine for it to show up. Most of the smoke comes out of the exhaust pipe (its like a smoke machine) and some from the hood area. I originally thought that it could have been due to the oil I put in the cylinders, but its too much smoke. I mean the entire street gets covered in smoke and its not producing less smoke over time. My feeling is that I maybe put too much oil on a cylinder to get the compression up and when it cranked the pressure was too high and the head gasket got blown making the coolant get into the combustion area and generating the white smoke. Could this be possible? Also I have put already 2 full bottles of coolant into it - I had originally flushed it out completely to work on the engine. The car starts and does not turn off anymore, but it has a VERY rough idle (sometimes it shakes). I can put it in drive and it moves. Also I know that I have a broken vacuum line.
 
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