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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #1
While checking my oil pan for sludge I found a couple of small pieces of plastic in the pan looks like it came from the timing chain guides, one of the pieces was a half moon shape, probably from the guides mounting bolt hole it must have just happened in the last 5K because I checked the pan before. anyway the truck runs fine but I don't feel comfortable driving it much longer so Im going to change it myself. My question is; Can I replace the guides without removing the chain.
 

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While checking my oil pan for sludge I found a couple of small pieces of plastic in the pan looks like it came from the timing chain guides, one of the pieces was a half moon shape, probably from the guides mounting bolt hole it must have just happened in the last 5K because I checked the pan before. anyway the truck runs fine but I don't feel comfortable driving it much longer so Im going to change it myself. My question is; Can I replace the guides without removing the chain.
Welcome to my world and yes its only a matter of time before it starts throwing error codes. The question of wether you can replace the guides without the touching the chain I don't know and is the same concern I have. I don't have the special tools required to setup the cam gears and timing chain. I'm calling today to get a quote for this job. I wasn't impressed with the quantity of plastic parts inside an engine of a $80k car. But hey maybe they consider the engine sealed for life like they do the transmission lol.

My post is here
http://www.rangerovers.net/forum/6-range-rover-mark-iii-l322/47951-cam-adaption-values-idle-04-rover.html

I also have another post where I took pictures of the small parts. Dont feel like looking for it but easily found.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #3
Yea Im looking for a cam tool right now, but Im still driving the truck, it runs very smooth and I don't have any noise except right after my last oil change it would rattle for about 2 sec then quit. I found a tool kit on ebay from German auto solutions its billet aluminum and a redesign of the bmw unit, I like the design it looks less complicated. The timing chain repair on this thing looks like a bear to deal with but Im going to start buying parts now and Ill fix it some time this summer. I think Ill be fine for a while it was only a few small pieces in the lower pan. The oil I used this weekend was only to flush the engine (for the 4th time since Jan) Im trying to slowly desolve any left over sludge so Im using riselone and frequent changes this was the last oil change before I go to 5K changes and I found a few plastic pieces. Oyea Im occasionally getting a Lamda code about every two weeks so the chain is probably causing it. I was wanting to buy a new set of tiers for my new rims but it looks like Ill have a project this summer, I think Ill call around and see if I can get a BMW indy to ive me a quote before I start buying parts though.
Welcome to my world and yes its only a matter of time before it starts throwing error codes. The question of wether you can replace the guides without the touching the chain I don't know and is the same concern I have. I don't have the special tools required to setup the cam gears and timing chain. I'm calling today to get a quote for this job. I wasn't impressed with the quantity of plastic parts inside an engine of a $80k car. But hey maybe they consider the engine sealed for life like they do the transmission lol.

My post is here
http://www.rangerovers.net/forum/6-range-rover-mark-iii-l322/47951-cam-adaption-values-idle-04-rover.html

I also have another post where I took pictures of the small parts. Dont feel like looking for it but easily found.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #4
Hey nsxxtreme I found a local Bimmer guy that has excellent reviews at Fairfield Imports in Pensacola FL he said it was a 10hr job for him @ $75 per hr = $750 + parts to replace the timing chain and guides on the Rover, he said the guides gaskets and chain will run around $300-400. I told him I am all over that so Ill be taking her to him for the repair
Welcome to my world and yes its only a matter of time before it starts throwing error codes. The question of wether you can replace the guides without the touching the chain I don't know and is the same concern I have. I don't have the special tools required to setup the cam gears and timing chain. I'm calling today to get a quote for this job. I wasn't impressed with the quantity of plastic parts inside an engine of a $80k car. But hey maybe they consider the engine sealed for life like they do the transmission lol.

My post is here
http://www.rangerovers.net/forum/6-range-rover-mark-iii-l322/47951-cam-adaption-values-idle-04-rover.html

I also have another post where I took pictures of the small parts. Dont feel like looking for it but easily found.
 

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Hey nsxxtreme I found a local Bimmer guy that has excellent reviews at Fairfield Imports in Pensacola FL he said it was a 10hr job for him @ $75 per hr = $750 + parts to replace the timing chain and guides on the Rover, he said the guides gaskets and chain will run around $300-400. I told him I am all over that so Ill be taking her to him for the repair
Good because I dont think it would have lasted until this summer. I opened mine up and the way the plastic pieces were wedged in there it did not look good. Basically the timing chain was like a chainsaw ripping the pieces to bits.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Got the timing guides replaced, while he was there he replaced all of the orings on water pipes, and injectors, replaced valley pan gasket, all vacuum hoses, checked both vanos, I told him to replace if needed, he said he can repair them for about $175 each side but mine were nice and tight with no problems, replaced timing chain and guides, replaced rear plate (cvc), and all new gaskets, flushed coolant, removed sludge, flushed and changed oil, ran a complete diagnostics on the truck, I thought my truck ran good before it went into the shop with an occasional vanos ratle at start up, I was only taking it in as preventative maintenance, but it runs better than ever I can barely hear it idle I love the old BMW V8 it is sooo butter smooth, . Cost me $1,800 but it was worth it so far. He also told me my fan viscous was stuck, and the fan will pull all of the time, I was thinking it was going out because it has been noisy lately anyway Ill try to change it out this week. The name of the shop is Fairfield Imports in Pensacola FL. he had lots of bimmers there and said he gets an occasional 03-05 L322 in his shop, he said the biggest problem he sees is lack of maintainance. The dude knows his stuff though I tip my hat to him, Oyea got a 1 year warranty on the work performed.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I come from the BMW side of the world and have participated for many years on bimmerboard.com/forums/e38 which is for the 1995 - 2001 7 Series. Starting in 1998/9, that car was upgraded to the M62 engine, so there's a lot of commonality between BMW 7s, 5s and the Range Rovers with the M62 engine -- as well as other parts and systems.

Here's a write up on replacing the timing chain guides on an M62 engine: http://www.bimmerboard.com/forums/posts/876903

As a general rule, bimmerboard.com/forums/e38, besides this board, is also a good place to look for solutions to engine issues.

Hope this helps.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I just picked up my L322 from a specialist repairer (south island NZ - don't touch the main dealers) after a complete engine recondition. The plastic chain guide failed in such a way as to allow the chain to impact the aluminium casing and componentry machining some away and filling the complete system with aluminium swarf. The advice of a specialist to the second hand dealer I bought the car was to get the bits out and flush it all through but being a metallurgist by trade I decided I looked at the swarf and decided to go the complete reconditioning route. It cost me twice as much but we did find swarf particles throughout the galleries, big ends and even the cam lifters (which could not be reliably flushed). The whole job cost me the equivalent of US$11,000 even with sourcing all the parts from the UK and US, although I had a transmissions service and the drive shaft joint (should have been done through a recall 10 years ago) done as well. If anyone is interested I have the bearing shells and a heavily damaged crank gear to photograph.
 

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You can't change the guides without touching the timing chain...

Once the guides have started to break up, I imagine it is only a matter of time before they collapse completely. There are 3 guides, the one on the right (looking at the front of the engine) is made up of just plastic - the other two (the one by the tensioner and the 'U' shaped on in the middle of the engine) have a metal backing. If the one on the right breaks up, it fails completely and then you get an almighty clattering noise as the chain is flying around loose.

If you change the timing chain guides, change all 3 at the same time - the guides for the cam shaft chains can be left as I've not heard of these breaking up.

You can change the guides yourself, although it is a huge job. The main issues are dismantling the cam covers and the front of the engine to get to the guide covers, removing the crank shaft bolt (the torque is huge), keeping the cam shafts in a given position so the chain will go back on. There is a kit for locking the cams in place and a pin for locking the flywheel in place - although I did it without either (I used an allen key for the flywheel and marked the camshafts).

The job took much more than 10 hours, although doing a 2nd time would be much quicker.

This gives quite a good description of the job, albeit on a BMW 740: www.bimmerboard.com/forums/posts/876903

If you're doing it yourself, the job is not for the faint-hearted...
 

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Hello there. I am about to tackle this job now myself. I also found plastic remains in the sump and the engine started to get noisy. I assume that I have to remove the front of the vehicle, such as the bumper, grill and radiator first, in order to get some access to the front cover plates of the engine. Is there a description somewhere which explains what to remove in which order? I don't want to make the job more difficult than it needs to be?
Thanks & cheers.
 
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