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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #1
I am getting ready to install the right upper timing chaincover and timing chain tensioner and could use some pointers.
Dumb question- does the narrow end go in first or the widerend?
 

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Small part goes into the cap, then spring, then the last tube part. Would’ve liked to use a picture but I must’ve used my last spare tensioner on my new project.


Or here’s a good picture and shows which way the last tube goes. Think of it in order 1 2 3..


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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks. The tensionerthat came in my kit is compressed. Iread somewhere not to let it spring out or they are tough to get in? So if that is the case do they release ontheir own?
Also, since I have the upper case out can it install thetensioner in the case before installing in the car to save myself some bustedknuckles trying to get the 19mm bolt tightened down?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Also, I saw on one video something about a "clip" that I assume goes on the end of the tensioner that contacts the guide rail?
 

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oh... hmm..

So I've personally never trusted the tensioner to spring out itself, I've always decompressed the tensioner and put it in, I take the whole thing, put it in a long 19mm socket, and thread it in. I'm a pretty short guy so I'm able to lay on top of the engine bay and reach around the engine to tighten it..but your mileage may vary...

Anyway, not sure what you mean clip, if you can find a picture of it but I've always used what comes with the tensioner and that's it. I use INA tensioners. I don't believe it can be installed without the timing cover in, but being the valve cover is still off it should still be easier. Of course make sure there is a zip tie holding the guide away from the tensioner and also to make sure it will not skip a tooth on the main crankshaft sprocket. After installing the upper timing cover the zip tie could be removed. That's the way I do it.
 

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I am just going through a similar thing so very appropriate. The part I bought is a febi tensioner. I am surprised how loose the cap is to the tensioner and I see the tiny clip that can hold the tensioner together but making it clic and lock together must be an art form. It actually makes me nervous to think that the exposed clip might pop off and end up in a bad place. So clip end toward the chain guide and there is a corresponding groove inside the outboard end of the tensioner sleeve that the piston fits into. The other point is that the pic from the dealer shows what looks to be an O ring is actually an aluminum washer much like an oil pan drain plug washer but does not come with the tensioner-of course-why would it. I assume it could be reused but in all the posts i read nothing really mentioned it specifically except for one post that said the ring could be sanded and then reused. I did buy the sealing washer from a bmw dealer. A little nervous about disassembly allowing loss of tension but praying that the chain cannot jump teeth.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Based on what you are saying and what I am reading, the "clip" is what is used the keep the tensioner compressed?
 

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Yes it is supposed to keep it compressed until after it is installed and then the engine oil pressure will overcome the friction of the clip and push the piston outward. Keralis makes a good point and if he can install the part without the clip compressed then I will try the same approach but with less experience.:shock:
 

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A little nervous about disassembly allowing loss of tension but praying that the chain cannot jump teeth.
Luckily, if you’re doing the tensioner with everything put together I’d say there’s probably 1 in a million chance it’d skip. With the engine being fully timed and the way the system works the other side is tensioned basically holding the chain where it is.


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Keralis, thanks for presenting the odds. I did the job but chickened out and compressed the tensioner and held it with the clip. I was quite nervous working blind after the little remote camera I was using broke. The sealing ring was still on the head so if replacing with a new one make sure the old one is removed first. I pulled the fuel pump relay and cranked the engine a few times before actually starting. One thing someone might consider which I sort of did is to run the engine long enough first so it won't run at 13-14 hundred rpm when starting before the tensioner fills properly with oil. A small point i noted is that the oil in the tensioner is much dirtier than the oil in the engine so it seems apparent that the oil does not really get flushed through the part and may impact its performance over time. Thanks to all who have contributed to this procedure
 
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