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Discussion Starter #1
Guys, so I plan to bypass my throttle body heater by connecting the two hoses, which seems like many on the board are doing.

My last question is what did everyone use to connect the two female hoses together with. I was talking with some people and they said that copper or any metal could react and corrode over time with the coolant. So my question is can the plastic tubing handle the heat ranges of the coolant....?

The coolant hose attached to the throttle body heater is about 10/16" outer diameter and about 8/16" inner diameter...
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Plastic should be fine. The overflow bottle is plastic. Maybe the auto parts/hardware store will have a high heat version or something.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Went to Home Depot picked up a pair of vice grips, a pair of padded spring clamps(might be too big to fit and work on the hoses at the same time...), screw tightening clamps for the hoses but can not find a 1/2" piece of plastic tubing....nothing at Home Depot, Autozone, or O'Reily's....

Have to keep searching for something, anybody recommend any commercial piece they used available around the country...L.A!
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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PVC black or gray 80 schedule barb fitting check any fish tank mag..I must of missed something why are we doing this?
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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To bypass the leaking throttle body heater...which in 90% of civilized areas is unnecessary anyway.
 

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LEGACY VENDOR
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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ahhhh thanks Mag :think:
 

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instead of bypassing, I intend to plug. There's no need to have coolant flowing through that small loop, just more places to leak. I havn't looked at the fittings, but they can be capped, or unscrewed and plugged.
 

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I just did this on SWMBOd's DII, the line coming out of the manifold to the heater was leaking (badly), I just disconnected the line going out of the heater and stuck it on the nipple coming out of the intake to go into the heater. I would've plugged it but it's after 10 and I HAD to get it done tonight. It's pretty buried under the intake, so the photos didn't turn out. Out of curiosity, I looked at Darcy, then couldn't help myself. It took an hour on the DII (bosch EMS) and 5 minutes on Darcy (GEMS).



you can see the inlet line I cut off, the hose clamp was inaccessible without pulling the upper intake, not a job for tonight.

That line provides a little bit of bleed for the system, but it's lower than the upper rad hose, and the upper rad is vented, so I believe it can be removed completely. I'm going to get some plugs and plug the intake/expansion tank.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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kmagnuss said:
To bypass the leaking throttle body heater...which in 90% of civilized areas is unnecessary anyway.

Ditto in Florida. :lol:
 

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hmmmm,

EXTREMELY humid the last 2 days, and BOTH Rovers have developed a stumble at idle, after the engine warms up. Related? maybe.....I think I'll un-bypass the DII, see if it clears up.
 

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Wow did I just waste $25 bucks on a new one? Oh well whats done is done. Did not apply it yet but hows that high temp silicone on something like this?
 

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medcapequip said:
Guys, so I plan to bypass my throttle body heater by connecting the two hoses, which seems like many on the board are doing.

My last question is what did everyone use to connect the two female hoses together with. I was talking with some people and they said that copper or any metal could react and corrode over time with the coolant. So my question is can the plastic tubing handle the heat ranges of the coolant....?

The coolant hose attached to the throttle body heater is about 10/16" outer diameter and about 8/16" inner diameter...
If you have no coolant/anti-freeze in your engine, then water is conductive effectively the two dissimilar metals will behave like an electrolytic cell. One will corrode at the expense of the other. If your system is filled with a quality coolant, electrolytic action will be inhibited permitting you to use another metal for your by-pass.
 

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bonnychoo said:
medcapequip said:
Guys, so I plan to bypass my throttle body heater by connecting the two hoses, which seems like many on the board are doing.

My last question is what did everyone use to connect the two female hoses together with. I was talking with some people and they said that copper or any metal could react and corrode over time with the coolant. So my question is can the plastic tubing handle the heat ranges of the coolant....?

The coolant hose attached to the throttle body heater is about 10/16" outer diameter and about 8/16" inner diameter...
If you have no coolant/anti-freeze in your engine, then water is conductive effectively the two dissimilar metals will behave like an electrolytic cell. One will corrode at the expense of the other. If your system is filled with a quality coolant, electrolytic action will be inhibited permitting you to use another metal for your by-pass.
nothing needs to be added to do this, you remove the short hose altogether, then plug the long one ( from the expansion tank) onto the nipple on the manifold. No connector piece and less joints to possibly leak...

That said, I'm less convinced the heater isn't needed, following the stumbling I had the other day, yesterday and thismorning were very low humidity andDarcy ran perfectly. May be related....
 

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I'm not sure if it's related, but carbureted motors heat the intake to help atomize the fuel, and offset the refrigeration effect created by a drop in air pressure across the throttle plates. As I understand it, if you have a reduction in air pressure, (vacuum) you also have a reduction in temperature that can freeze moisture from the air even if the ambient temps are moderate.
 

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rtonder said:
I'm not sure if it's related, but carbureted motors heat the intake to help atomize the fuel, and offset the refrigeration effect created by a drop in air pressure across the throttle plates. As I understand it, if you have a reduction in air pressure, (vacuum) you also have a reduction in temperature that can freeze moisture from the air even if the ambient temps are moderate.
This comment is so true. But then newer carbs are heated in order to reduce emissions.
 

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Sorry to bump this up but I have to.

I am going to bypass both lines that run to the throttle body. Here are my questions/concerns.

1.) The longer line, the one that runs all the way to the expansion tank, can it just be unplugged from the throttle body and then completely capped off?

2.) The other line that runs into the manifold just behind the A/C compressor, can this one just be removed entirely and capped at the source? Or should I recycle it into another coolant line with a fitting? If so, which line and how? Do I join the 2 lines together with a plastic fitting?

3.) The now open end plugs at the throttle body, do I just cap these off as well or leave them open or it doesn't matter?

I hope I'm not being thick. Just really want to get this done so I can work on other stuff but I want to get it done right.

Thank you all in advance for all input.

Best,
Ashtray
 

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You will want to join the lines to maintain proper circulation.
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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Been a while since I've done one, but it should be 5/16" fuel line that will fit both ends. You'll want to remove both lines then connect the fuel line to where they went on the manifold and header tank. I normally run the line around the rear of the engine. @5' of line IIRC and then I double clamp it with SS hose clamps.

Martin
 
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