RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

I'm wondering what you'd do if you wanted to begin to repair a 1991 Range Rover that hasn't been run in about 4 years due to an ABS issue (or some sort of brake problem).

The battery has been stolen, so that'll be first - does anyone have any suggestions as far as the type of battery to be used or anything else to check?

I'll drain the oil and replace it with a new filter - I'm wondering which oil is best for a vehicle like this with about 185,000 miles on the motor. I'm using Shell Rotella T4 15W40 in a Discovery II, which has been good. Does anyone know the capacity? Should I use a specific filter?

I planned to drain the coolant and replace it - does anyone know the best place to drain the system and if I should flush it completely with anything else? What is the proper type of coolant for these vehicles?

The tires are in terrible shape and need to be replaced - I planned to use 235R16, since the stock suspension is on the vehicle, which is sagging quite a bit) and this tire size seems like it won't be hard to find (unlike the original tires, which are on the vehicle). Is there a better size to use? What pressure do you inflate them to?

I figured I would probably need to replace the spark plugs - is there an ideal type? I might need to install new ignition wire as well - anything I should get if I need to replace it?

If there's anything else you'd do to get a car ready to start again, please let me know. I'm hoping she starts up and I can figure out the braking issue...

I know you won't be too happy to see her like this, but I promise I'll share images after she's been cleaned up and taken care of again.

Thank you

285737



IMG_1756.JPG
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,109 Posts
If that is where it has stood, then it should need very little, I've fired one up that had stood outside for 8 years. Get the biggest battery you can find that will fit but note that the posts are the opposite way round to most. 15W-40 or even 20W-50 oil, remember it's an engine that was designed back in the 1960's. Coolant wants to be standard Ethylene Glycol, not OAT. There should be a drain plug on the bottom of the radiator. Original tyres were either 205 x 16 or 235/70 x 16, go for the 235s. For spark plugs, go for NGK BPR6ES.

For anything else, try Island 4x4 and LRDirect (www.island-4x4.co.uk and www.lrdirect.com) both in the UK but ship overseas and far cheaper than the suppliers in the US. Download RAVE, the factory workshop manual, from Handy downloads - Topic - rangerovers.pub.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
Since you plan to remove the spark plugs, if would be wise to dribble some oil in the cylinders PRIOR to turning. Also I would spin it over without spark plugs with the old oil first to make sure there is immediate and sufficient lubrication before changing the oil. Spinning the engine with the plugs removed will greatly reduce the pressure on the bearings which will have little oil at the moment. Basically use the starter to get the lubrication going before starting.

Let us know how things go, I love a good-ol' car resurrection!
 

·
Registered
1989 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
190 Posts
Seconded on the coolant, the newer stuff can be highly corrosive to older motors. I'd suggest 20w-50 if you're somewhere that doesn't snow. When it does finally crank over, be sure to shout the obligatory "SHE LIVESSSS!!!!!!" with some manic laughter.
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Wow, thank you all for all of the excellent advice! I'm really looking forward to getting this beautiful classic in working order again - there's a brake issue that I'll have to attempt to fix after the basics. I'm trying to make sure I've got all the tools I need out there and I'll absolutely be yelling when she fires up again!

I'm hoping the radiator in there has a plug in the bottom. That'd be helpful. Should I flush it completely with distilled water or anything? A hose?

I do live in a warmer climate - the annual averages are 41F low and 82F high. It's 90F today... I use 15W40 in my 2003 Discovery, but I'm thinking it could be good to use 20W50 in this Rover, which has about 185,000 miles on the odometer.

Does anyone know the oil capacity?

Does anyone know the size of the oil plug?

Does anyone know the coolant capacity?

Thanks again. I'm really looking forward to posting some updates here. This vehicle is about an hour away from here and going to be a lot of work for me, but now's the time for that! Cheers
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,109 Posts
Oil capacity, 6.6 litres from dry including the filter, but as it is unlikely to be completely dry, 6 litres should do it. Coolant is 11.4 litres. If what you drain out is coolant, it shouldn't need flushing, if it has had plain water in it, then it might be a good idea to reverse flush it (particularly the heater matrix). Oil drain plug could be anything between 14 and 19mm.

Brake problem may be something or nothing. If the brakes work but the ABS warning is on, worst case it'll need a sensor or it may just need them reseating with a small hammer.
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thank you, I didn't know how much oil and coolant this Rover needs.

I don't think it has plain water in it - you meant plain water as in pure plain water, not tap water mixed with coolant concentrate right? I'm not sure if it was filled with a mixture or distilled water and coolant concentrate, or if it was has non-distilled water mixed with concentrate. Would the latter necessitate a flush? If so, should I use distilled water for that as well and dump it through the radiator cap and/or the bottle? Or would it be ok to flush with the hose?

I believe that the brakes were working on and off, which is why the vehicle was parked and sat for so long. I seem to remember that sometimes the brake pedal felt like there wasn't any resistance and got a bit frightening. I'll have to see what it was exactly that was happening. I didn't know very much then and I still don't, but I'm trying to learn! Hopefully it's just a sensor - the ones that are at each wheel? I saw there are some switches or relays under the seat that could be used to diagnose brake system issues with blinking light codes. This is going to be interesting! I'm really looking forward to sharing the progress with y'all.

Littoral, you should absolutely fix her up!

Thanks again everyone.
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
51 Posts
I seem to remember that sometimes the brake pedal felt like there wasn't any resistance and got a bit frightening.
That does sound frightening. It doesn't seem to be an ABS problem per se, maybe air gets into the circuito somehow.
Does the ABS pump turn on at key-on, stop after about 50 seconds, then turns on shortly only every third or fourth pedal press?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
Intermittent dropping pedal normally indicates a failed master cylinder. Typically they still work some when you apply a lot of pressure rapidly but they leak when applied slowly. Also depending which seal leaks the fluid remains in the system so you have no fluid loss but still failing brakes. I doubt ABS or no ABS makes a difference
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
354 Posts
Intermittent dropping pedal normally indicates a failed master cylinder. Typically they still work some when you apply a lot of pressure rapidly but they leak when applied slowly. Also depending which seal leaks the fluid remains in the system so you have no fluid loss but still failing brakes. I doubt ABS or no ABS makes a difference
The hydro-electric brake system in a Classic has a “modulator” and pump instead of an MC and Booster. A bad accumulator also can cause a spongy pedal but usually results in a very stiff one.


Oil drain plug is 1 - 1/8” or 29mm, hangs off the left side of the car.
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Thanks everyone, it's been some years since the vehicle was driven and I'd need to get back in it again to see exactly what symptoms are present with the braking issue.

Is the brake fluid going to be OK after these 4-5 years if the levels are OK? I could try to test the pedal and see how it feels if the vehicle starts up properly. I ordered some of the items needed online (oil filter, drain plug and washer) and I'll get the others locally (battery, oil, coolant, spark plugs).

Just to try to get the best idea of what's needed here, the climate where the vehicle is has an annual average of 41F (5C) low and 82F (27C) high. I live about an hour from the vehicle in the mountains where it gets a bit colder, but I don't know if I'll take this Rover up there until I've figured a few things out.

The odometer shows ~185,000. Locally, I'm able to get Shell Rotella T4 15W-40, Valvoline 20W-50, or Castrol GTX 20W-50. Which would you use, or should I order a different oil online?

Zerex G-05 is available here - would you mix it 50/50 with distilled water, or is there another preferred ratio, perhaps considering the climate here?

About the battery, I'm able to get a 700, 750, 800 or 875 CCA unit locally that should fit. Which would you choose? I believe the 875 CCA battery is a Duralast, which is Autozone's own brand.

The NGK BPR6ES spark plugs are available locally, so I'll be sure to get those, as well.

Thank you all!
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
354 Posts
G05 comes premixed or concentrate, up to you if you want to save money. 70/30 water to coolant should be fine for your needs too.

15w40 is plenty for that climate. I use Rotella T6 (Synthetic) 5w40 every 8k miles. They recently started making a 15w40 version of it too.
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
51 Posts
Is the brake fluid going to be OK after these 4-5 years if the levels are OK?
It will be ok for the drive home, then change it. If it's too old it becomes thick, the ABS pump gets noisy, then it can't build pressure because it cavitates, then it runs full time, then it dies (there are no spares) and you don't have power brakes.
But if the pump is still cycling on and off and not runnin for more than 50-60 seconds at a time, you're fine.
If it runs every pedal push and not every 3 or 4 pushes, the accumuator is bad and needs changing. Luckily there are spares for them: changing it is just regular maintenance anyway.

For the battery, I'd just get the best battery I can get. Both my Classics tend not to start after sitting for about 4-6 weeks, so getting a good one helps.
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
2 Posts
Before first start, I agree you should pull the plugs. A few drops of Marvel Mystery Oil in each plug hole would be good. Also, if you pull the relay for the fuel pump (it’s behind passenger kick panel) you can crank a bit to build oil pressure and avoid raw fuel washing the oil off the cylinder walls.
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Thanks Tex - I plan to leave the vehicle where it is for now and just get her running again, since I want to be sure everything's alright. I'll have to see if that sounds like the issue the brake system has. I'm sure the brake fluid could use a flush, although I'm hoping not to have to do that more than once here while working on the system. I haven't done that in this vehicle yet, so I'll have to figure that out. I read about it a while ago and it looked like there was a bit of a procedure... It could be that the accumulator is bad. It's been a while and I doubt it's been changed, ever, so that could be a good place to start with this if they usually need to be replaced every 10 years or so anyway. About how often have you replaced yours?

Marvel Mystery Oil sounds like a great idea - I'm just wondering: do you use it along with some regular motor oil? Does it need to be added first? It looks like it's available at O'Reilly's around here and I'll do anything to get this Rover running again and with all the care I can afford to give. I'll have to try that fuel relay trick! Hopefully I can figure out which one it is if there's a diagram. Without that relay and the spark plugs, I'm hoping to start things off as easily as possible!

I'll know a lot more this week and I'll have updates so you can see what all of your excellent advice has helped with! Thank you again!
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I’m wondering about something: when I pull the spark plugs, how would you oil the cylinders? Do you use an oiler to get down there? Also, will I need to use motor oil as well as Marvel Mystery oil, or is MM oil enough? I’m hoping I can get the MM oil bottle in there without making a mess.
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Hi everyone, I’m making some progress here - things have been crazy and the vehicle is over an hour away.

I’m just wondering how you all get oil into the cylinders - do you use some sort of long dropper?
About how much do you inject?
Do you inject marvel mystery oil AND motor oil, or just one or the other?

I’m also wondering if anyone knows how to use a breaker bar to gently turn the engine over to prime it, as I’d heard this could be a good way to start things up again.

Do you think I’ll need a new thermostat, fuel injectors and a complete drain of the fuel tank and line?
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top