RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone,

Let me provide you with a brief history of my EAS:
  1. Hard Fault, 400 mile drive
  2. Clear faults
  3. replace valve block O rings
  4. Still slow leakdown overnight
  5. Hard fault, another 400 mile drive (realizing I'm an idiot for waiting)
  6. replace rear air springs, car does not pump up
  7. replace compressor seal, car does not pump up
  8. Find bottom collet has fallen out of dryer, replace dryer
  9. Car pumps up! if left for over 24 hours EAS switch blinks to refill, but no noticeable change in height
  10. Car shows blinking EAS light, doesnt go away, soft fault
  11. Rest faults, still not pumping up, bags holding air
I've been through a lot. This car really hates me :(. So here is where I am at with diagnostics

Compressor is supplying pressure
pressure coming out of air dryer into valve block
pressure going into reservoir
pressure coming out of valve block into rear bag lines
NO PRESSURE coming out of lines to front bags
whole car is not moving

Any lucky guesses on this one would be greatly appreciated!!


Thanks guys!!
 

·
Premium Member
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
249 Posts
One thing I didn't hear you mention is the plungers on the top of the valve block. Do you hear them clicking at all when you change height or anything? If you have a nanocom, you could trigger them manually to test if they work. I would double check all the electrical connections in the EAS box to make sure you don't have anything corroded and things are seated properly.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
32 Posts
Mine did the same thing after replacing compressor, rebuilding valve block etc. Rear would go up but front would not. Read in this forum about leaving a door open for approx. 9 minutes after starting car. This gives the tank time to build pressure. Checked to make sure the car EAS light was flashing to raise. Then shut door, car went up. Never thought about the weight of the motor the front bags had to overcome. So from there I knew valves must be working right.

When I drove the car and stopped at a couple of stop lights, the car dropped back down on bump stops. When I got home I climbed underneath to soap the front air lines, found no leaks. Then sprayed the rubber air bags, found one that was leaking through the pores of the rubber. For some reason I had never just sprayed the airbags, just everything else. Replaced the 2 front bags and EAS has worked great for about a year now. Messed with that EAS stuff for over 2 years.

Thanks to everyone on this forum for all the information you cover.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
559 Posts
Check the pins & sockets inside the 12-way connector block between Driver Pack & Valve Solenoids. Mine appeared to be clean & ok, BUT when I checked each contact individually they were loose. . . . consequently valve operation was intermittent. When the ECU tries to adjust it sometimes gets no height change and detects soft fault.

Also make sure the tank can reach full pressure (door open trick) before attempting to raise the car. If you want to save the compressor piston ring from wearing out during testing, connect an airline via the Dryer to pre-fill the tank !!

Using the combo of Air-Line feed & EAS_Unlock software you can test the EAS quietly without using fuel !!

Pete
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
690 Posts
You don't. Well, unless you don't mind having an uninsurable vehicle that handles like a stoned cow and permanently has the headlights aimed at the sky.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
325 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
First thing I would do is make one of those jumper harnesses detailed on the main site at http://www.rangerovers.net/repairdetails/airsuspension/suspump.html

Unplug the EAS connector from the eas computer under the seat C117.
Take a look at the picture next to the heading "4. Manual Activation of Air Compressor" and you will see "link pins 1 and 8".

Doing what that photo shows will make the compressor run, even (from memory, when the car is switch off or maybe you have to put ignition to on..). You are bypassing the safety features so don't leave it running for more than 10 minutes.

Now scroll up a bit and see the table under C117.

Pin 1 gives power. If you make up a wire harness where one wire joins 3 (just twist them together and protect the join with tape) then you can do some tricky stuff! This wire is really simple, literally you have one "input" and three "outputs" all shorted together. Basically I mean you want one electrical wire with 4 ends.

Push the wire into pin 1. Put one in pin 8 to make the compressor run for a while, say 5 minutes. Then put one into pin 26 so that you are supplying air into the spring. Then pick the spring you want to pump up say the left front which is pin 10. Hold the last wire end onto pin 10 for a few seconds or less. It should lift that corner. Same for the other corners.

It is a really simple job to put a schrader valve into your system. Costs about $10. You need a 6mm T piece where the top of the T is a schrader vale. Any air handling supplier should have them. Depressurize your system (as above but using the exhaust pin & inlet pin together and then the exhaust pin and one by one each spring) or using EAS software. Remove the air tank line from the valve block, using a block of wood on the bottom & a razor blade from the top, neatly cut it. Join it back with schrader valve t piece.

Now you can pump up your RR any time, even if your RR compressor fails.

Then jumper it to refill the tank for 10 minutes - or use a workshop compressor.

You should never need to drive home on the bump stops again. Even with just some air in just 3 corners it is a LOT more comfortable than hard on the bump stops.

If you are ever stuck with using a service station compressor that is limited to 60psi - it won't be enough to get your front off the bump stops and may only lift the back if it is empty, if it does that. The way around that is to jack the car up so the axle is hanging (take the weight of the axle). If you fill the extended bags to 60psi, when you lower the weight of the car back on them and they compress you can end up with 80/90 psi in them and that will get you home in comfort. Do it in stages so that the bags don't come off (lift the car a bit, pump it up a bit then lift it some more and pump some more).

I'm pretty quick at all this sort of stuff now...... I've had my p38 since 2001.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
690 Posts
I actually fixed that problem. It was a faulty set. Warranty covered it.
"Faulty" in that they are made of a coil of bent wire instead of a sort of rubbery bag full of air.

Have you ever seen a truck with coil springs? No? Wonder why...
 

·
Banned
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
3,952 Posts
You'd better clarify that Gordon, quite a few on here seem to think the P38 is a truck. By truck we are referring to a heavy goods vehicle, a semi, an articulated goods vehicle, the trailer on the back of that big tractor unit often seen with a shipping container on it. 50 years ago they had leaf springs but since then they almost all use air suspension because it works whether empty or loaded.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
690 Posts
Hmm, y'know... I bet you could do a decent van conversion on a P38. Like those Citroën BX vans they used to sell in Norway to get round the tax thing, back doors welded up and panel gaps filled and the rear windows panelled over.

I've seen a Rangie Classic van, a guy who lives on the Isle of Skye has one.
 
R

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
and by "Van-conversion" you mean make a commercial of it??

Land Rover never made it available and in the beginning somehow made it even not possible to get one registered if you build it yourself.... but the last few years it seems to be possible to get P38 on commercial licence in the Netherlands.

needs all windows the sides behind the B pilar on replaced by panels (rear door right may be glass for safety on the road, so you can see when turning right) all safetybelt and seat fixings need to be made unusalble and there needs to be a "wall" behind the front seats ...
 

·
Banned
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
3,952 Posts
and the point you are trying to make is?

The Ram 2500 (not Dodge Ram as Dodge seem to have disowned it and Ram appears to now be separate) isn't a truck, it is a lifestyle vehicle made to a price so will use whatever is cheapest to keep the selling price competitive. A picture of a truck is shown below and what is that you can see holding the body up at the back? Air springs that's what.

NicePeteRearViewI29Nb5-8-08.jpg

By the way, you have not fitted coil overs, nobody makes coil overs for a P38 thankfully. A coil over is so named as it consists of a coil spring over a shock absorber. A McPherson strut is a coil over as the shock absorber runs up inside the coil spring, what you have is a simple, very simple, coil spring with the shock absorber mounted elsewhere.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top