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I have a problem with my L322-02 v8. 4.4 As soon as the roads gets slippery from snow or ice it starts sliding / floating terrible from side to side. The problem starts in low speed, like 30-40 km/h. It has not always been like this and the tyres are almost new. It is almost impossible to drive.

Any ideas?

Mart
 

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my 2011 with brand new blizzaks was terrible in the snow last winter. this winter i chucked the blizzaks and put nokian hakkas on but havent had an opportunity to test them yet. outside of tires i dont know what else you might be experiencing.
 

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my 2011 with brand new blizzaks was terrible in the snow last winter. this winter i chucked the blizzaks and put nokian hakkas on but havent had an opportunity to test them yet. outside of tires i dont know what else you might be experiencing.
Same here with nokian hakkas on ice
sometimes i am drifting sometimes as usual
maybe due to low battery i haven’t dsc or hdc
outside temp. Is now -10 and rainy in siberia
 

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Same here with nokian hakkas on ice
sometimes i am drifting sometimes as usual
maybe due to low battery i haven’t dsc or hdc
outside temp. Is now -10 and rainy in siberia
Sorry mate but i fail to see the connection from a bad battery to cause bad sliding in snow. my understanding is the first point of contact is usually the main cause (tires).Having a low battery cant possibly be the cause of terrible sliding IMO.
 

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Sorry mate but i fail to see the connection from a bad battery to cause bad sliding in snow. my understanding is the first point of contact is usually the main cause (tires).Having a low battery cant possibly be the cause of terrible sliding IMO.
I have a weak battery now i have to charge it. But i am searching a draining issue. With a weak battery on morning cold starts computer turns off the dsc and hdc system first. I am drifting first curve each cold day. Tomorrow i will check it for you, if i wait enough with running engine and couple of restart the system I assume i get enough battery power and dsc systems will work properly.
Do you have snow in Florida or really cold weather?
i am driving 5 months in hard winter conditions, we have too much ice on roads on -40C and its very exciting drifting but right after parking line i am drifting little bit more and didnt see the orange dsc system active sign. Will check for you
 

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i use hakkas with no studs. do you have hakkas with studs?
i have 3 sets of tire on 2 sets of land rover alloys. one set 19” without studs winter tire for autumn and spring mid season second winter tire is stud hakka 275/40/20 and summer tire on this alloys goodyeargt2. On deep ice i am wearing hakka for 3 months 2 months mid season and 7 months on good year,
nokian is the best winter tire, michlen is also very good.

On new honda crv we bought hakka8 new series, it’s a new era
 

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my 2011 with brand new blizzaks was terrible in the snow last winter. this winter i chucked the blizzaks and put nokian hakkas on but havent had an opportunity to test them yet. outside of tires i dont know what else you might be experiencing.

Maybe your driving style? I have blizzaks on my full size and it is an unstoppable beast.

Case in point the road to my street is a series of massive hills, look at this debacle.

uW3gUQ5.jpg

Down the hills, up the hills zero issues. Meanwhile every other car on the road was stuck including that jeep in front of me :)

In the snow there is no need to put it to off road height unless you're stuck in deep snow, it just raises your center of gravity. I rarely put it into snow mode, but if you're having trouble maybe do that, from what I can tell it basically slugs out the response of the car making it more difficult to overcompensate. Let the computer do the work. Low battery is unrelated unless you're getting all sorts of error messages, and even then if the truck is running, that isn't going to make it handle poorly in the snow unless you're relying on the computer to correct your aggressive driving style. You may also want to consider checking your tire pressure, for whatever reason people are under the impression lower pressure is best in the snow, that's false. If anything you want them slightly over inflated to account for dropping temps. You want them inflated properly so the treads are where they need to be to bite into the snow and or cut through it. If you're low on pressure the work treads will just end up bowing into the center of the tire and your contact patch to the snow will be terrible.
 

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I have a weak battery now i have to charge it. But i am searching a draining issue. With a weak battery on morning cold starts computer turns off the dsc and hdc system first. I am drifting first curve each cold day. Tomorrow i will check it for you, if i wait enough with running engine and couple of restart the system I assume i get enough battery power and dsc systems will work properly.
Do you have snow in Florida or really cold weather?
i am driving 5 months in hard winter conditions, we have too much ice on roads on -40C and its very exciting drifting but right after parking line i am drifting little bit more and didnt see the orange dsc system active sign. Will check for you
I drive often from Florida to Seattle and i use my car mainly for the 4000 mile (6437.376 km)trip.

This journey takes me through about 16 states and all types of weather depending on the route i take. often i take the diagonal route and ths rout takes me through some gery cold states up the interstate highways. When i get up north into Whyoming and South Dakota that is where i often experience -3o farenheit temperatures , there the vehicles map system goes blank because it cannot read the temperatures and only return when i approach conditions it is programmed to read.

The snow i drive through up there is usually about 2-3 ft if the road has not been plowed and often there are very few vehicles on the highway except for the occasional trucker due to the bad weather , i usually see alot of cars off the highway in ditches because the weather was so bad they could not drive on.I am a night drive too and sleep during the day to avoid heavy traffic issues.

I used to use the nitto terra grappler tires and they were great but they were also soft so they wore down quickly , so i switched to open country toyo A/T and they are much better(rated for 60,000 miles-96560.64 km).When i get into the snow terrain i never use the HDS i drive as normal and no skidding or getting stuck even when driving through the dreaded "black ice"
I hope this helps you ,The point i was trying to make is i highly doubt the low battery is the issue , tires are usually the first point of checking then your driving style may be next , that said i do not know if our roads are dirt roads or if you are driving through clay soils terrain in snowy wether.. that would pose a completely unexpected challenge to any vehicle regardless of how good your tires are


 

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I drive up in the Sierra over the winter months, been doing it for over 30 years. My approach to driving in snowy/icy conditions is to have the vehicle in Grass/Gravel/Snow, and manual sport mode - don't hit the brakes, use the transmission to slow down. As soon as I can feel I'm losing traction I pull over and put the chains on - which I have done twice driving from Mammoth to June Lake. I've had Pirelli Scorpion, Nitto Terra Grapplers, Hankook ATM and Continental TerrainContacts (current) and frankly, they were all fine in snow and lousy on ice (hence the chains).
 

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My response is probably not very useful as I've yet to drive my L322 in the snow, but for the past 25 years I've been driving RWD BMWs almost exclusively, and my solution to New England's driving was:
- quality summer tires (Michelin PilotSports, Conti DWs, etc.);
- studded Nokian Hakkas (latest generation possible) for the winter;
I have yet to encounter a snow storm where I couldn't have made it home safely, and having children that ski, this translates to a lot of winter driving all over MA/NH/ME/VT. I have a set of studded Hakka 8s for L322 already, will update this thread once I have some white stuff to try them in.

P.S. I also have a set of Thule chains for real emergencies in all of my cars, though I've yet to use them.
 

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Sorry mate but i fail to see the connection from a bad battery to cause bad sliding in snow. my understanding is the first point of contact is usually the main cause (tires).Having a low battery cant possibly be the cause of terrible sliding IMO.
Pontoon, a low battery will cause all sorts of issues, erroneous error codes ans full systems to shut down. Thus reason he posted he had no DSC or HDC.
 

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Extending on RRToadHall's comment - with studded tires the L322 should not be sliding on most any surface. Now if your electrical system which controls the brake and related drive electronics is an issue that would explain your situation (DSC and HDC). Do you have all sorts of lights turning on before, during and/or after? The system may be sending brake signals and related which are not consistent with the conditions. A low battery could cause this. (Although I would think from an engineering design perspective - it should default to the safest approach possible - turning everything off).

My L322 had no issues with the Minnesota winter with standard tires - and I actually found excuses to go out and play in the snowstorms.
 

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Pontoon, a low battery will cause all sorts of issues, erroneous error codes ans full systems to shut down. Thus reason he posted he had no DSC or HDC.
Yeah but those lights on the system imply they've been deactivated. I don't see how those issues could cause him to be sliding about the road on blizzaks unless his driving style is so aggressive in the snow the computer is constantly correcting. I rarely ever have the system correcting for my snow driving... I could be wrong though, I just don't see how a fault can cause the truck to just slide around like that. Again, obviously with the lights on and those system deactivated it won't be correcting for you... maybe that's his issue? Slow it down a bit?
 

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brad s1 - I agree with you for the most part. I assume the default, DSC and HDC lights on, would be for the system to turn itself off until the codes are cleared. Now if the system is turning on and off due to battery issues (and that is clearing the fault codes so the system reengages), I suppose it is possible the system could be compensating inappropriately. That would be a crazy outcome and poor system design. Only the system design engineers could explain if this scenario is possible.

To add to your comments - studded tires on a vehicle that weighs what the L322 weighs, it is hard to explain sliding described by the OP. Driving on ice is another story. The OP says this is a new occurrence so something is wrong - question is whether the battery is the cause or some other sensor.
 

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brad s1 - I agree with you for the most part. I assume the default, DSC and HDC lights on, would be for the system to turn itself off until the codes are cleared. Now if the system is turning on and off due to battery issues (and that is clearing the fault codes so the system reengages), I suppose it is possible the system could be compensating inappropriately. That would be a crazy outcome and poor system design. Only the system design engineers could explain if this scenario is possible.

To add to your comments - studded tires on a vehicle that weighs what the L322 weighs, it is hard to explain sliding described by the OP. Driving on ice is another story. The OP says this is a new occurrence so something is wrong - question is whether the battery is the cause or some other sensor.
Agreed difficult to actually gauge what sliding is by the description. Tho... if the assists are intermittently working you should be able to tell as you can feel the corrections happening.
 

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Agreed difficult to actually gauge what sliding is by the description. Tho... if the assists are intermittently working you should be able to tell as you can feel the corrections happening.
Update. Temperature -16
first start was good and quick but had Christmas tree light than radia restsrts its self and i get dsc hds warnings. After 30 min I restarted the car without warnings and on my first drifting dsc worked, and warning light blinked.
The importing thing is without restarting the car this systems are activeting or not
 

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The loss of traction control will absolutely cause the truck to slide. The low voltage will always cause a lot of problems with the different computer systems and traction control and sounds like the culprit. All the later Land Rovers are voltage sensitive and require a good full battery to function properly. The traction control on these vehicles use the antilock brakes in combination with wheel sensors to apply brake pressure to spinning wheels and, thereby transfer torque to the ones spinning less. Tractors have a left brake and right and you work like this but manually. Our automated ones work very well. It will cause a noticeable difference if nonoperational.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thank you for all the replys.
I replaced my battery 2 years ago. Maybe it is time again.
 
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