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2016-2018 Range Rover Sport
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm curious what the Terrain Response Control in my 2017 RRS HSE Td6 actually does. I fitted snow tires last week (Nokian Hakkapeliitta R3 SUV) and played around a little with the Snow Mode. It appears to dull the throttle and pull-away in second gear. Does it lock any diffs (are there diffs to lock?). What do the other modes do?
Thanks
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover Sport
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208 Posts
I think it depends. I have a V8 with a low range transfer case as well as centre and rear lockers. The lockers are not under my control. The car locks and unlocks them. I can see what it is lacking on my 4x4 screen. Do you have a low range transfer case?
 

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it does lock the diffs as necessary (that happens in all other modes, too) and it maximizes traction control as it wants to prevent any and all wheel spin.

btw, I actually started to pay attention to how the car is handling the diffs in auto mode. I put the 4x4 info screen on the dash (of my '18 full size) just to see how it behaves as the weather and road conditions change. Well, it looks to be crazy adaptive to what's going on, indeed. I'd recommend to everyone who has an 18 or a 19 to do the same and just see for yourselves. It's easy to forget how much these vehicles work while they want to let us know exactly zip about all that effort.
 

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Snow Mode. It appears to dull the throttle and pull-away in second gear.
That is the idea. It keeps your from spinning your tyres and reduces your torque at the tyres to give you positive departure from a dead stop.
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover Sport
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30 Posts
How do you like the Nokians so far? How are they in the (cold) dry and wet? Thinking about pickup up a set as they're the highest ranked snow tire around...
 

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2016-2018 Range Rover Sport
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13 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
No, there is no low-range transfer case.
 

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2016-2018 Range Rover Sport
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13 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
How do you like the Nokians so far? How are they in the (cold) dry and wet? Thinking about pickup up a set as they're the highest ranked snow tire around...
Love them so far. Its coldish (1C to -5C) and wet and they track straight and stop quickly. I think the new R3 is better in the dry than the previous versions. I cant wait until Jan/Feb to try them out in real snow.
 

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2016-2018 Range Rover Sport
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7 Posts
I have the R3's on a 2016 RRS V8... They are noisy at all speeds, but to be expected given the crystals I think. Snow/slush around 0c/1c they do ok - forward traction/uphill is good, lateral too. Braking/downhill not so good, far from confidence inspiring. Same results on snow ice down to -5c; forward traction/uphill good, lateral good, downhill/ice/braking not so good, raises my heart rate. The vredestine wintrac extremes are the best I had on this car, and I tried a few. They beat the R3's handsomely for braking and downhill. They are also the quietest tyre I ever had - that includes summer tyres. And they will go well beyond the 190kmph rating of the R3's (I use German autobahns a lot). Just don't use them below 5mm. All tested over several Swiss winters up and down small, steep untreated mountain roads to walk the dog. Auto response is good, but dedicated snow setting is better - the car reacts much quicker to traction loss or slides. Low range, snow setting, hill decent on: down a black ice/snow/ steep mountain road with zero margin for error - car just handles it. No idea how, just gets the car down. Incredible. Did the same road in an X5 with hill decent on - what a joke, almost died. Never been so terrified. Same tyres too. RRS in the winter is truly a tool.
 
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