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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, just wanted to let the forum know that I successfully swapped a motor from a 2012 XF into a 2010 Range Rover HSE NA.

I haven’t seen this documented when I was searching for help a few weeks ago so I outlined a high level summary below, I did get some pointers from @anvilrob that helped me in the right direction that confirmed it could be done. @anvilrob thanks again your help was much appreciated!

Back story; I bought a 2010 Range Rover with 87k miles from a private owner here in South Florida who said the engine was toast, it was running but quickly would get hot. He said he did the head gaskets after a cooling system failure (this was evident with white splash marks of coolant under the hood like the radiator or reservoir exploded it has a new radiator and what looks like a new reservoir as well) but after doing head gaskets he still had water in oil and the smell of coolant in exhaust. it had a bad oil leak as well (I’ll get to that later in part 2)

I purchased it for 4,000 knowing I would put an engine in it, after pricing out used Ranger Rover direct replacements I decided to go for a 5.0 engine from a Jaguar because they were cheaper (usually by at least 40%) so I bought a 2012 XF engine with 75k miles for 3,300 off eBay (the seller sent a video of it running before pulling it)

What needed to be swapped from the Range Rover to the XF engine;

1. Range Rover exhaust manifolds
2. Range Rover Oil Pan
3. Range Rover Oil pickup tube (1 6mm thread needs to be tapped into the block of a pre-existing hole for 1 of the 2 bolts that hold the tube in place)
4. Range Rover main crank pully

While the engine was out and parts being swapped I did a complete timing chain job new chains, guides, tensioners (alldatadiy.com is your friend) 29 bucks gave me access for a year.

It took about a week in my home garage (after work hours and the weekend.)

Just came back from a trip with it to Key West from Miami and it pulls like new, no issues 3.5 hours each way.

I believe the old engine is good I’ll write a part 2 to this soon if anyone may be interested in helping me figure how to tell if the block/heads are good, if so I may rebuild it and sell it.

Also I may be too new of a member to post pics of the engine tear down/install. The attachment icon is greyed out, can someone verify this? It will help if you can see what I post in part 2 and why I believe I still have a good engine.
 

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You shouldn't need to use the Attachment icon, but the Picture icon (Insert Image when you hover over it). That shouldn't be greyed out.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Congrats on the success! Looking forward to your write-ups. I have some questions but I'll wait until I read your future posts.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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377 Posts
Well done.

I should’ve also recommended replacement of your front and rear lower control arms (or at least the bushes) along with the lower ball joints and links while you were performing this work as you have to disconnect them to remove the front driveshafts anyway.

Did you pull the engine out horizontally through the radiator aperture, after first removing the grill, bumper, beam, headlights, condenser and radiator and rotating the disconnected steering rack forward through 90 degrees to allow clearance for the front differential to slide past the steering input or did you hoist it out vertically?

On your 1-4 swap over list you may want to add #5 as swapping over the original LR engine harness onto the donor Jag motor as the Jag and LR ECU module’s connectors are completely different (as is the Jag and LR starter motor crank connector) yet everything else is identical.

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter #5
2F3318E8-676A-4B20-9ADA-B2EBBF458AE9.jpeg

I pulled the whole front end off, the steering rack and reservoir I was able to leave in place. I actually got away with only dismantling the passenger side suspension and was able slide off the differential. Putting it back with the drivers side suspension still in place was a little tough but not too bad, I would suggest doing it the proper way next time.
 
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