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Discussion Starter #1
I recently purchased a 2006 RR Sport and was surprised to discover I was briefly stuck with both right wheels and left rear in a foot of snow while the left front wheel was on pavement. I assumed all wheels turn on the RR and that the lone front left tire on pavement would've easily pulled me free without the other 3 spinning. Any thoughts? Thanks!
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover Sport
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I have had customers with complaints like this at the dealership. My answer is you need to wait. The traction control can take a few to figure out which tire has traction. Foot "gently" on the gas and just let the tires spin till it gets the power to the correct wheel. Also make sure not to put or rest a foot on the brake pedal.

I have had one with 2 front tires hanging in the air off a drop and one rear tire in a slick pool of water. Took the computer a few to figure out that the left rear tire was the only one on the ground and it pushed the car over the ledge perfectly. Everyone (all land rover guys) were pretty impressed that it did it.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Also what TR setting were you in? Snow, gravel and grass is not designed for thick snow - more just a light covering. Thick snow is more like being offroad - I have not tried it but some have said to use sand in thicker snow. For me the fail safe is rock crawl as it locks the center diff providing locked drive to the front and rear as well as a few other changes. These combined with traction control will get drive to the wheel that has traction.

As said - with traction control you need to get wheels spinning before the system can identify the one wheel with traction, then brake the spinning wheels to send drive to the wheel with traction. Even with TR set to onroad, keeping the gas pedal at over 2000rpm in drive, should in a few moments see TC activate and drive the wheel on the tarmac - now whether that one wheel has enough traction to pull the car out is a different matter - but then standard 4wd techniques kick in - try backing up a bit then going forward and back etc to compact the snow a bit so the wheels get a bit of traction there as well.
 

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When you’re really in the deep stuff you’ll need to turn off DSC; it will cut throttle to the point you will not get enough power to the wheels to get out. Especially true if you’re in a ditch or on an incline. Even with chains on I’ve had to do this.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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A few years back we had about 20 inches of snow here and of course I had to go out only to get hung up on top of the snow with no tires touching anything. I lowered the truck then raised it hoping to compress the snow and be free. No luck, had to shovel some to be free. lesson learned and new GAP tool + lift rods will hopefully keep me high enough in the future.
I would love to have a user guide from everyone's experiences that outlines the best traction control, DSC, height settings to use in different situations. I too found sand mode is best in deep snow and muddy up hill runs but still question the best practices that are not listed in the owners' manual.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Even more important...what kind of tires are on the vehicle, how new are they, are they summer tires or M&S rated or All Terrains. You can have all of the best 4x4 gadgets at work here in the RRS and ****ty tires will leave you spinning in place.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Even more important...what kind of tires are on the vehicle, how new are they, are they summer tires or M&S rated or All Terrains. You can have all of the best 4x4 gadgets at work here in the RRS and ****ty tires will leave you spinning in place.
Very true. I have thought about that... what is the biggest factor to getting through the toughest spots? Tires, 4x4 gadgets, or driver? I have concluded driver after I watched a FFRR with stock 20's stuck in the mountains in the woods late at night and one of the very skilled club members got it down the off camber muddy trails without a problem. I have to believe most drivers without trail experience would have had issues. on the flip side tires and clearance can make a big difference too.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Very true...driver skill is critical...learning to feather the throttle, not gun it...allowing the traction control to work and eventually grab, turning the wheel back and forth to get more grip (helps with All Terrains since there is siping on the side of the tire), and working inch by inch until traction is achieved. Which reminds me that joining your local Land Rover club and going out with experienced members is a great way to learn all the techniques of offroad driving.

The other item maybe recommended for folks to carry, especially in winter is a pair of shortened MaxTraxx...they just came out with these smaller versions which are easy enough to keep in the car. Get a pair or 2 pairs and you can self extract out of snow, sand, mud much more easily...probably a good idea to add a carrying case so the mud or snow doesn't get all over the rear compartment...

Here's a great site I've been using for a long time...there are lots of cool items here to separate you from your money and have fun at the same time! Enjoy!

https://expeditionexchange.com/
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Very helpful! Thanks. As far as what mode, I don’t know. The mode is that dial by the shifter, yes? Well, here’s another issue then. The fluid reservoir on passenger’s side of the radiator that is responsible for sideways leveling, I believe, has been removed. That would affect the dial control modes wouldn’t it? Maybe the dial doesn’t even work with that reservoir removed?? Could that explain the lack of traction in the snow
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Are you sure you had ACE? I'm not sure an ACE system fault would disable the dynamic response system. Most non SC came without ACE.
 

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Not meaning any disrepect but I can now see why you had issues in the snow (but then other people may have had issues too).

I think you need to sit down and read your handbook and if you do not have one download it from the stickie at the top of the L320 section. (oops not there as yet but is here https://www.rangerovers.net/forum/9-range-rover-sport-l320/330616-2005-2009-owners-handbook-repair-guide.html

Yes the knob is the Terrain Response selector and by choosing the correct setting for your situation and knowing how this works it may have helped you. A tip is as mentioned - whenever offroad turn DSC off (the switch marked DSC at the top of the centre console above the radio) - Direction Stability Control (DSC) is designed to help correct skids and is normally on. When on loose surfaces it can cut in and cut power and apply brakes as required so hindering efforts to get out of sticky situations. Be warned though and changes in TR and DSC switches back on so you need to check it. Onroad just leave on as if may save your life in a high speed sideways skid.

You said "Well, here’s another issue then. The fluid reservoir on passenger’s side of the radiator that is responsible for sideways leveling, I believe, has been removed. That would affect the dial control modes wouldn’t it? Maybe the dial doesn’t even work with that reservoir removed?? "

I am not sure what you are alluding to here - someone mentioned ACE but I do not have ACE on my car so I am not sure what components live in the engine bay. ACE is a hydraulic assist system that works with your anti-sway bars to help keep your vehicle level on hard corners.

So really will have minimal or no impact on TR settings - ACE is useful for onroad handling but will have no real impact when stuck in snow - it will not level the car sideways in that circumstance. As i said I dont have it and I dont need it but then I have the lowest powered RRS there is with a 2.7 litre diesel.

So go through the handbook that I have linked above so that you learn the complete functionality of your vehicle.

Good luck with it.

Garry
 
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