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Discussion Starter #1
My front passenger side has been dipping for a week now but I would raise te car and it would level out when it returned to normal height. Now I'm at the airport and front of the car is down all the way with suspentuon inactive notice. Can I still drive it 35 miles to my house?
 

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gooddfella said:
My front passenger side has been dipping for a week now but I would raise te car and it would level out when it returned to normal height. Now I'm at the airport and front of the car is down all the way with suspentuon inactive notice. Can I still drive it 35 miles to my house?
goodfella,

The only thing your going to damage is your kidneys. Did the battery go flat? Are there any lights on other than the "suspension inactive" message? Can you hear the compressor running? If not, disconnect the battery and reconnect it. Start the vehicle, turn the steering wheel lock to lock and if the compressor is running, leave the vehicle run with a door open to build up sufficient pressure to raise the vehicle. then shut the door and hopefully the vehicle will raise. ibis1 ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That didnt work.
Battery was replaced last week due to leaving the car at the airport for too long and someone said I should replace the dead battery. It is a fully charged Interstate.
The car was towed 2 weeks ago and the way it was towed seemed to put a lot of weight on the front suspension, I'm guessing thats what messed things up.
Since then the front right side kept dropping every time I drove the car or sometimes sitting overnight but one night I disconnected the battery and the next day the car was still at normal height :think:
I'm thinking about ordering the RSW Solutions EAS tool but is there another diagnosis tool that can do the same thing AND read other codes that doesnt cost a lot? If I'm gonna spend $200 I might as well spend a little more and get a more versatile tool dont you think?
 

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You can drive it slowly, ie under 55...it will be bumpy.

The air suspension is complicated...unless you have experience working on Range Rovers, I'd take it to the dealer for that personally. The MkIII air suspension doesn't lend itself well to shade tree mechanics. Even if you read the codes, are you equipped to replace expensive suspension components based on the codes you get? I'm willing to bet the codes you get won't make it obvious what the problem is unless you've wrenched these suspensions a bit.
 
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remington said:
You can drive it slowly, ie under 55...it will be bumpy.

The air suspension is complicated...unless you have experience working on Range Rovers, I'd take it to the dealer for that personally. The MkIII air suspension doesn't lend itself well to shade tree mechanics. Even if you read the codes, are you equipped to replace expensive suspension components based on the codes you get? I'm willing to bet the codes you get won't make it obvious what the problem is unless you've wrenched these suspensions a bit.
The air suspension is NOT complicated, and telling people it is only continues the missunderstanding that it is out of the realms of a competent mechanic to address.
Compressor, airbags, Tank, sensors and piping. For the most part these are the parts of the air suspension system. If they are all intact and in good order, then the system should work fine. Failure is easy to diagnose and parts are simple to replace (and cost about as much as suspension parts on other high end cars). It's only with the electronics that it becomes difficult to work around but that is not the air suspensions fault, that is inherent in the L322 Range Rover.

Talk to a user called Shupack in the P38 forum. I don't know how much he knows about the system on the L322, but the guys a genius when it comes to the P38 system and their fundamental operation is not that different.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Took it in today. Dealer said airspring is leaking. I have a hard time believing that because it can sit for 2 days with battery disconnected and stay the same height. But I can drive it up the street and back and as soon as I get to my garage I can hear the airbag deflate and it gets lowered all the way. Someone said the leak could be somewhere that when its parked it wont leak but what about when I just park the car and hear it deflate like theres a penny sized hole in it? I dont know. I ordered the strut from Rover Renovations (Shupak?) and hope it'll fix it. I'll update with the results.

PS Will it need calibration or anything after i install the strut?
 

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Could it be a faulty sensor?

When I park in the garage at home, frequently about 10 seconds after closing the car door I will hear a slight electronic buzz, and the vehicle will lower. Usually front will lower first, then back will lower with a bit of hiss after electronic buzz has finished. Other times the back will lower, but seemingly not the front. Occasionally it seems to tilt slightly to the left (looking from the rear). When next I get to a dealer, it's one of the items to get sorted prior to original warranty expiring (it is certified also, which I suppose is good...).
 

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rfdiii said:
When I park in the garage at home, frequently about 10 seconds after closing the car door I will hear a slight electronic buzz, and the vehicle will lower.
That's normal behavior. It's called self leveling and it very often occurs on Land Rover s equipped with EAS a few seconds after you turn off the engine, leave the car and close all doors. The suspensions will automatically lower one or more corners of the car - as determined by the EAS module - to level it. You can usually hear the hiss of the released air as this occurs.
 
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gooddfella said:
Someone said the leak could be somewhere that when its parked it wont leak but what about when I just park the car and hear it deflate like theres a penny sized hole in it? I dont know.
That's quite feasable. The way the bag operates is it folds over itself. When you go into extended mode, more of the bag is revealed, possibly expossing a small hole or crack, when in access mode, more of the bag is folded over itself,, closing any gaps, or holes. There's a small area (a lot like your elbow) that gets worked at over and over again that wears facster than all the rest.
Simple check, extend your airbags, get a spray bottle with a small amount of dish liquid an spray the crap out of the area and look for the bubbles. Try this at all of the different heights to try to unveil where the air leak is coming from. Don't forget the air tube that enters the bag either, these have been known to leak.
 

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gooddfella said:
Took it in today. Dealer said airspring is leaking. I have a hard time believing that because it can sit for 2 days with battery disconnected and stay the same height. But I can drive it up the street and back and as soon as I get to my garage I can hear the airbag deflate and it gets lowered all the way. Someone said the leak could be somewhere that when its parked it wont leak but what about when I just park the car and hear it deflate like theres a penny sized hole in it? I dont know. I ordered the strut from Rover Renovations (Shupak?) and hope it'll fix it. I'll update with the results.

PS Will it need calibration or anything after i install the strut?
goodfella,



If that is the original air spring, it's past its prime and it was telling you there was a problem. Also the R/H front spring is the most common one to go first. If you heard air escaping, it's leaking plane and simple. The motion of the suspension and adjusting of the spring height can reach a spot (point) where the bead does not seal as the bag gets older and looses its pliability. As for the air line, if it is leaking, it will be constant and will not matter if the vehicle is in motion or stationary. Listen to your vehicle when it tells you something is wrong. It can help prevent situations like you had. As for the system being complicated, that's a relative word, if you understand how the system functions, it's not complicated. Rocket science is complicated to you and me, or at least me, but not to a rocket scientist. Lastly, you do not need to recalibrate the system, that data is stored in the ECU and the vehicle will sit at the same height it was with the old spring fully inflated. Good luck! ibis1 ;)
 

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Mr. Range Rover said:
ibis1 said:
Also the R/H front spring is the most common one to go first.
What's your reason for believing this?
We install three R/H for each L/H. I can't say but possibly on R/H drive vehicles, it may be the L/H that always goes first. Perhaps some of the members from R/H drive markets could shed some light on that. ibis1 ;)
 
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ibis1 said:
Mr. Range Rover said:
ibis1 said:
Also the R/H front spring is the most common one to go first.
What's your reason for believing this?
We install three R/H for each L/H. I can't say but possibly on R/H drive vehicles, it may be the L/H that always goes first. Perhaps some of the members from R/H drive markets could shed some light on that. ibis1 ;)
Surely they should be like brakes and be replaced as an axle set!!
 

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Mr. Range Rover said:
gooddfella said:
Someone said the leak could be somewhere that when its parked it wont leak but what about when I just park the car and hear it deflate like theres a penny sized hole in it? I dont know.
That's quite feasable. The way the bag operates is it folds over itself. When you go into extended mode, more of the bag is revealed, possibly expossing a small hole or crack, when in access mode, more of the bag is folded over itself,, closing any gaps, or holes. There's a small area (a lot like your elbow) that gets worked at over and over again that wears facster than all the rest.
Simple check, extend your airbags, get a spray bottle with a small amount of dish liquid an spray the crap out of the area and look for the bubbles. Try this at all of the different heights to try to unveil where the air leak is coming from. Don't forget the air tube that enters the bag either, these have been known to leak.
Mr RR is dead on. Rigs that do mostly highway miles will have much higher wear at the point that the bags flex in highway mode. Folks that putter around town most of the time will have wear at the point of flex in standard mode. If your rig leaks in highway mode it can easily wear out your compressor keeping a bag filled out on the road. Once you raise back up to standard mode the leak is sealed and can sit for days with no suspension drop. This is why it is so important to check for leaks at ALL heights when doing the soapy water test.
 

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ibis1 said:
...you do not need to recalibrate the system, that data is stored in the ECU and the vehicle will sit at the same height it was with the old spring fully inflated. Good luck! ibis1 ;)...
If you're lucky, and your suspension system doesn't recognize a hard fault, you won't have to have it reset by Testbook or the like. If the system recognizes what happened & throws a hard failure, you will have to have it reset after replacing the part(s) by a shop equipped with Testbook or one of the very few other maintenance interfaces. I think that one of the sponsors sells an EAS tool that can do this for not much more than the price of having a pro do it (depending on your local pro)- check the parent website or diagnostic equipment subforum for more on that.
Unless you're good with a wrench and have no money for maintenance, you may want to have a pro do it. It is pretty easy for the mechanically inclined. Dangerous for others. Could lose a finger!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thank guys. Tried the soap water thing but couldnt really look all over the air spring. At this point I guess I'll just assume its leaking.
Waiting for the new airspring to get here. Going to do it myself. Dealer cleared the code but since I played around with it today it came back so I guess I'll have to take it in again after I install it.
Or I might just buy the Faultmate FCR for about $400 and reset it myself. I think its a better bang for the buck than the RSW Solution tool because it can clear other codes too.
 

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We install three R/H for each L/H. I can't say but possibly on R/H drive vehicles, it may be the L/H that always goes first. Perhaps some of the members from R/H drive markets could shed some light on that. ibis1 ;)[/quote]

Surely they should be like brakes and be replaced as an axle set!![/quote]

Air springs are not considered a wear and tear item such as brake pads and tires etc. I'm not saying it's a bad idea to replace them in pairs, but where do you stop with that premise? If your right rear axle seal is leaking would you replace the left rear as well? Brake pads are sold in axle sets, air springs are not. ibis1 ;)
 
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ibis1 said:
Air springs are not considered a wear and tear item such as brake pads and tires etc. I'm not saying it's a bad idea to replace them in pairs, but where do you stop with that premise? If your right rear axle seal is leaking would you replace the left rear as well? Brake pads are sold in axle sets, air springs are not. ibis1 ;)
Far be it from me to say you're wrong, but...you're wrong, or at the very least, your premise is wrong.

Air springs are most certainly a wear and tear item and need to be replaced in pairs so that axle balance remains even. Much as you should, without question, replace shock absorbers in pairs (even though they are sold individually). I understand that brake pads are sold in axle sets but rotors are not. Would you replace those individually (I hope you say no)

If my right rear seal is leaking, yeah, while i'm in there, i would replace the left as well, but that's a bad example, as a leaking axle seal, with very rare exception, won't affect the handling or performance of the vehicle.

1 old and 1 new airbag on the same axle would affect the handling and performance, as the rubber that has aged will not compress / rebound at the same rate as the new one would (possibly leading to unstable handling during enthusiastic driving).
 

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Mr. Range Rover said:
ibis1 said:
Air springs are not considered a wear and tear item such as brake pads and tires etc. I'm not saying it's a bad idea to replace them in pairs, but where do you stop with that premise? If your right rear axle seal is leaking would you replace the left rear as well? Brake pads are sold in axle sets, air springs are not. ibis1 ;)
Far be it from me to say you're wrong, but...you're wrong, or at the very least, your premise is wrong.

Air springs are most certainly a wear and tear item and need to be replaced in pairs so that axle balance remains even. Much as you should, without question, replace shock absorbers in pairs (even though they are sold individually). I understand that brake pads are sold in axle sets but rotors are not. Would you replace those individually (I hope you say no)

If my right rear seal is leaking, yeah, while i'm in there, i would replace the left as well, but that's a bad example, as a leaking axle seal, with very rare exception, won't affect the handling or performance of the vehicle.

1 old and 1 new airbag on the same axle would affect the handling and performance, as the rubber that has aged will not compress / rebound at the same rate as the new one would (possibly leading to unstable handling during enthusiastic driving).
The opinion I was expressing as to air spring replacement was that of the Land Rover design and engineering group. I said "I" don't have an issue with replacing them as a set. The vast majority of my clientele drive to the country club and back, they rarely if ever use their vehicle in the situation your describing. I don't have a problem with your theory,but perhaps you should take it up with the Land Rover engineers. They do however recommend replacing rotors in pairs. ibis1 ;)
 
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