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2013-2015 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #1
At 85K miles I'm feeling like my Range Rover is riding a bit rough.

At this point there is no leakage (that I'm aware of) with the air bags.

Is it at all reasonable to consider replacing the front and rear struts/shocks alone and leaving the air bags as they are? Has anyone done this, what's involved, part numbers, etc?

(I'm also confused because I see that in some cases the air bags themselves are for sale and in other cases they come with the strut attached.)

Thanks for the info!
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Getting struts alone without the air bags seems to be pretty difficult unless you go straight to LR and then you better be ready to pay them about 700 bucks a piece just for the strut. Most places offer the whole assembly, or just the bag for some reason.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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The fronts you would pretty much need to do the whole assembly. The rears are easy since it's just a strut by itself.
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #4
The fronts you would pretty much need to do the whole assembly. The rears are easy since it's just a strut by itself.
This makes sense. I may just replace the rear and see how the ride is after that, thanks.

Anyone happen have the right part numbers?
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #5
This makes sense. I may just replace the rear and see how the ride is after that, thanks.

Anyone happen have the right part numbers?
I am seeing the following part number: RPD500940
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #6
FYI, from my friend at the dealership:

The rears are only replaced when they start leaking, beyond that point they are considered in proper working condition.

He also suggests checking the front control arms and ball joints, which commonly fail.
 

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Keep in mind that there are rear Bilstein shock absorbers too. Replaced these on my MKIII and it made a world of difference in ride. Might give that a try. Relatively cheap potential fix.

Completely agree with the others though that the fronts should just be replaced full assembly.
 

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I converted from airbag suspension to shocks on 3 different RR's I owned over time. My experience is that eventually the air bag suspension always fails. I have been happy with the conversions. There are conversion kits readily available
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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It is not reasonable to replace just the strut. At 85K miles, if the air bladder portion of your front air struts are original, they WILL fail soon due to dry rot. These have a 100% failure rate (usually at 90K+ miles--mine went at 92K). Therefore there is no point in replacing just the strut portion. Besides, if the strut is not leaking fluid or does not have some other obvious failure, they are not considered to be in need of replacement. I replaced the dry rotted air bladder on both my fronts and rebuilt them onto the original struts.
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #10
What I ended up doing here is replacing both controls arms, ball joints and stabilizer arms.

The ride improvement is definitely noticeable. The old parts were not that bad, but you could tell some were loose and beginning to fail.

I would guess it took me about 6 hours to do and it's not without it's tricks and complications as a project- so not for everyone. I used Delphi parts at a total cost of about $400. The OEM parts from the dealer at list price would have been in the $2000 range, plus I'm guessing another $800 to install. So quite a savings doing it yourself.

The dealer was nice enough to give me a parts list for this project:

ControlArms2.png
 
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