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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #1
First post. Previously owned a P38 and been driving a 94 RRC 300TDI for a couple of years, originally from Malaga and completely rustfree. Since many years I've been lusting after a 2 doors. There's something about those proportions I really like. Having been through a couple of restorations in the past, I wanted a rustfree car. Last summer I found one and bought it unseen. I had a local mechanic check it out though. It's a 89 3.5 EFI from the Badajoz area.
The panels on the car are not perfect at all but I hoped for a very solid car underneath. Today I finally started the dismanteling process. The idea is to do a soft restoration.
I took the rear quarter panel off only to discover what appeared to be dust sticking on the inner body. I was tad shocked but that quickly turned into joy. The car is perfect, not a speck of rust. Incredible.
The quarter panel though is in bad shape. Could anybody give an opinion whether it would be possible to straighten it. I could take all the paint off as preparation. Not sure though if it is worth the trouble or if I should replace it.
Thanks for any input.

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You can fix it, it will be a long process but will feel good when it is done. Aluminium will need to be annealed to work with. The soft metal will stretch when it is bent, and the process of stretching it when it is cold makes it brittle. So you need to heat it until it is soft enough, and then gently tap it back into shape with a set of autobody hammers and dollies. You can find them online. There are different ways to check the temperature of the metal when you anneal it. If you are using an oxy/acet torch you can use it to put soot on the metal, and then gently heat from the other side. When the soot starts to burn off it's hot enough. Or I've heard of folks using olive oil, and you heat from the other side until the oil changes colour. Be careful to heat the metal slowly, it is easy to melt a hole in aluminium.

I have done annealing with copper in the past, and soon I will also try with aluminium, as my Series 1 rovers have a few dents.

Good luck, and post pics for us.

Beautiful truck by the way, good find!
 

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I found a heat gun sufficient when getting the dents out of my 2 door birmabright panels.

The rear section of the quarter panel is steel, so if you don’t want to fit light guards, you can weld up the two holes.

Cheers, Steve
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #4
You can fix it, it will be a long process but will feel good when it is done. Aluminium will need to be annealed to work with. The soft metal will stretch when it is bent, and the process of stretching it when it is cold makes it brittle. So you need to heat it until it is soft enough, and then gently tap it back into shape with a set of autobody hammers and dollies. You can find them online. There are different ways to check the temperature of the metal when you anneal it. If you are using an oxy/acet torch you can use it to put soot on the metal, and then gently heat from the other side. When the soot starts to burn off it's hot enough. Or I've heard of folks using olive oil, and you heat from the other side until the oil changes colour. Be careful to heat the metal slowly, it is easy to melt a hole in aluminium.

I have done annealing with copper in the past, and soon I will also try with aluminium, as my Series 1 rovers have a few dents.

Good luck, and post pics for us.

Beautiful truck by the way, good find!
Thanks a lot. Still undecided and waiting for quotes from the breaker in Holland.

I found a heat gun sufficient when getting the dents out of my 2 door birmabright panels.

The rear section of the quarter panel is steel, so if you don’t want to fit light guards, you can weld up the two holes.

Cheers, Steve
Thanks for the tip. Were you able to straighten them out completely? Did you post any pics? The panels also seem to be available new from a few sellers in the UK, around 500 £. Woud you know if these are Birmabright or regular steel?
 

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Thanks a lot. Still undecided and waiting for quotes from the breaker in Holland.

Thanks for the tip. Were you able to straighten them out completely? Did you post any pics? The panels also seem to be available new from a few sellers in the UK, around 500 £. Woud you know if these are Birmabright or regular steel?
I’ve just worked on a couple os panels so far, as all have multiple dents per panel, so it’s a work in progress. I decided to do a complete strip down and rebuild of my spainish 2 door sourced from Grenada...
4F133513-BF00-475E-8B82-A6AD4CA5DE5A.jpg


Any new panels available will be made of ABS, as far as I’m aware.

Cheers, Steve
 
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