RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Can anyone tell me what the stock 16 values are for the EAS?
I would greatly appreciate it. Tried searching but couldn't pull anything.
 

·
FOUNDING MEMBER
Joined
·
4,509 Posts
but just change them all to something wacky and the ECU will automatically revert to factory settings (afer giving several rounds of fault/clear/fault/clear)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Interesting.
Guess Im gonna give that a try, but if someone still knows them, I will appreciate to get them.
 

·
Premium Member
2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
4,635 Posts
Testbook measures it by bit counts, and not by a common measurement. IIRC, and I havn't had much experience with T4 and EAS as yet, but Normal height is 120/130 counts, off road is 140ish, highway is 115ish and bumpstops is around 60ish. However they are rarely all the same at all 4 corners. You may get the front or rear matching, but rarely both. When calibrating the ride height, T4 will raise the EAS to max height, and then ask you to inset the 4 pegs in place (into the bump stop hole), then it will drop onto the pegs and set its calibration height. You do the same for all the heights.

The LR tool to set the EAS is quite expensive (£200) but essential to set the ride heights properly. You can make up a set of them.

Most of the other systems use a set-by-eye system allowing you to change the pre-set heights.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
922 Posts
Doubt you will get exactly what you're after anywhere!

PLEASE NOTE : LR calibration blocks require access to a Test Book :!:

The LR EAS Systems Engineering Document specifies that for the 1995 P38 onwards, the true measure of "Standard Height" is defined as when the distance between the bottom of the Bump Stop stub and the axle plate is 100mm +/- 4mm for the front and 105mm +/- 4mm for the rear axle. Other (Access/Hwy/High) heights are taken from these measurements.

The Bump Stop stub /axle plate distance is therefore a "constant" independent of minor wheel / tyre size changes, inflation pressures, poor alignment of body panels (using the wheel arch measure) etc....

" Why-is-it-so?" asked the professor :shock: :D (Aussie in-joke for those over 50 yrs of age...)

It would appear that when using the LR calibration blocks, the resulting sensor bit counts provide the Test Book with two sets of reference data relating to the Bump Stop stub -axle plate distance, from which it calculates the bit counts for the other set heights and overwrites these into the EAS ECU memory registers.

The heights of the calibration block sets are 70mm and 136mm respectively

Now: here's the interesting bit: 136mm approximates the bump Stop - axle plate distance for "high" mode (Not extended/ Max High mode)

70mm approximates the Bump Stop - axle plate distance for highway mode

However, the calibration blocks do not appear to take account of the 5mm front/Rear difference specified by the EAS SID ...another of life's mysteries

I have recorded a series of heights/bit counts across the range ...have called in a favour and given them to a mate (professional mathematician /engineer) to see if he can force fit a curve of some sort and develop an equation which can be put into a spread sheet to predict correct bit counts ...but he's a busy man...will probably be early in the New Year...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
I have recorded a series of heights/bit counts across the range ...have called in a favour and given them to a mate (professional mathematician /engineer) to see if he can force fit a curve of some sort and develop an equation which can be put into a spread sheet to predict correct bit counts ...but he's a busy man...will probably be early in the New Year...
Did your professor mate ever come up with a curve?
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top