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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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I had an idea! So I have the spring conversion, but still have the stock compressor. Anyone used the compressor for airing up tires? Just a thought, and it would save me form getting an ARB compressor or something of the sort.

Thanks in advance!

Best Regards,
Gabriel
 

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Some people use it for both so no need to convert to coils just so you can blow up your tyres.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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I have read other posts where people said it was not designed to run continuously for The time it would take to air up four tires. It is a low volume pump. I guess if you kill yours it doesn't really matter though.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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The stock EAS compressor is a 'weedy' little unit so best to retain the air tank which the compressor can recharge in slow time but can provide instant air pressure for whatever purpose. This, of course, requires retaining the EAS control system to start/stop the compressor appropriately.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
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for auxiliary air purpose you will be better off retrofitting a via air or arb, both are good but via air can be found in longer duty cycle and faster service i/e pump up.
factory does not deliver as good has a short duty cycle, if used in other service than factory set up it will not last.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Valid points. But........How much will this be used?
The factory air set up ain't that bad, and the stock compressor goes daily for decades sometimes with out failing. Even then, it is a simple and inexpensive rebuild.
I would say Go for it with the one you have, and if it proves problematic, then invest in a quality replacement.
If you are planning however to do serious offroading in soft sand, and will be dumping all the air from the tires daily and refilling time is an issue, then by all means, install a more robust system. I have an air chuck on mine, and it works very well to do normal maintenance of tire air pressure.
 

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I had an idea! So I have the spring conversion, but still have the stock compressor. Anyone used the compressor for airing up tires? Just a thought, and it would save me from getting an ARB compressor or something of the sort. Gabriel
It would never work.. to not even with tank it is a low output pump that simply keeps the reservoir full of compressed air.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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It would never work.. to not even with tank it is a low output pump that simply keeps the reservoir full of compressed air.


Beg to differ.
Works great.
My air chuck is screwed into the drain plug hole of the tank (with protective cover for mud and debris) Simple.
Plenty of air for taking care of tires, and even light dusting on the dashboard.
It is not used daily, and not used for heavy duty airing up. (Have topped up tractor tires)
I have had to plug a tire and use it to go from zero psi to 38 on 2 occasions, and it is actually faster than I thought it would be.
Not detrimental to EAS operation in any way either.
If it shortens the compressors life by a month or so, then so be it. I keep a rebuilt one on the shelf......And have not needed it in the last 10 years.
 

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If you compare the compressor with one of the little ones sold by car accessory shops for inflating tyres, it's an industrial strength, he-man of a compressor. OK, so if you were constantly using it to inflate all your tyres you'd wear it out fairly quickly but as a standby it will do the job nicely. Easier to stick a can of squirty sealant in a tyre and use the compressor to finish inflating it than to change the wheel if you get a puncture.
 

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If you compare the compressor with one of the little ones sold by car accessory shops for inflating tyres, it's an industrial strength, he-man of a compressor. OK, so if you were constantly using it to inflate all your tyres you'd wear it out fairly quickly but as a standby it will do the job nicely. Easier to stick a can of squirty sealant in a tyre and use the compressor to finish inflating it than to change the wheel if you get a puncture.
No kidding! I can't believe some think it wouldn't work. I have a little POS cigarette lighter compressor that I use for raising and lower tire pressure for my trailer tires (depending on payload). Its slow but gets the job done. Using the Rover compressor would be a huge upgrade especially if you kept the reservoir which is probably still there if the compressor is. I also have that compressor as an EAS backup with inflation valves.
I have the same 12V compressor in my Audi for the spare tire. From the factory, it has a crappy emergency tire. I can fit a full size without air. I would rather risk the compressor not working that drive on the tiny tire on a Torsen diff all wheel drive.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I highly recommend doing this, I used 6mm black/blue plastic water line quick connects, T's, one-way check-vale, and shut off with a coil of 6mm blue hose add a chuck of your needs, under by the spare. It will air up very nicely. It is slow delivery type system. Keep the air filter/dryer clean and you will be good to go.
 

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It will work, but you are gonna knacker the EAS pump in no time. The standard pump can do about 0.5 CFM, but achieves up to 140 PSI or so. The standard EAS reponds quite quickly with full tank, but not on the pump alone when tank is empty. Four air-bags at 60psi is more than one fill of the tank which takes 6-10 mins.

Modern cheap 12V tyre inflators are usually about 1.2 CFM but make loads of noise. We could use one of these for better EAS response but it would drive you mad all the time. . . . hence why LR used a quieter high pressure low CFM pump.

In the OP's case, why not remove all the stuff in the EAS housing & fit a decent 12V tyre compressor. You're never gonna use it while driving.

Then re-condition the pump and valve block on the bench, ready for when you re-instate the EAS properly, and put the tyre inflator in the boot !!
 
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