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Discussion Starter #1
Well, this has to be the messiest and most time consuming project I have taken on since owning my '95 Classic. I am only halfway through this project, and boy what a project it is. I have fought with rusted exhaust bolts, banged the mess out of the crossmember to gain clearance, busted my hands and knuckles, covered in transmission fluid for most of the day, the list goes on. I am amazed with the amount of work it takes to change a filter. I can only imagine what the stealership would charge for this job.

I'll be back at it tomorrow and hopefully get this thing buttoned up. Oh yeah, I'm going to add a large garage and 2 post lift to my Christmas list this year!


Colin
 

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Landrover 'engineering' at it's finest :wink:

On the plus side you should notice an improvement in shift quality once it's all back together, sort of makes it worthwhile, sort of...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, I was cussin' Land Rover's engineering during the process. Good news is I got it all back together today without much fuss. I was a bit surprised because I have found that things usually come apart a whole lot easier and quicker than they go back together. I did notice the tranny was smoother during my 75 mile trip into town and back today. I feel pretty confident the previous owner of 7 years never changed the filter. And after all I went through to get it changed, that feeling was solidified. With 171K on the ticker, I feel it was worth the effort to get it done and done right.

Colin
 

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I did the same operation about four months ago. It took me five hours, a ruined t-shirt covered in ATF and lots of elbow grease. I did not remove the exhaust though. Getting the oil pan out was ... well... interesting, at the least. I cursed at least twice and threw a couple of spanners towards Solihull (I don't know whether they hit the target). :roll:

The re-assembly should have been easy - if only the oil pan gasket (the rubber thingy) would have stayed in its place. I think I lost a 4 kg hammer during this operation. It's probably still on its way somewhere over the North Sea.

BUT: It was well worth the effort! The gear changes got considerably smoother and the box operates like an extension of my mind, changing just where and how I want it to change. :dance:
 

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That is the reason i use "karaasi"to do my Rangie maintenance :lol:
Rgds:Jukka
RR92 Westminster 4.6
-73 Rover P6 3500Si
 

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Wanna hear me change the steering box and the radiator last week? Especially the moment five to four friday afternoon when I broke the lower oil cooling pipe coming from the oil pump to radiator? You probably heard me screaming, even though I live 400 km away from you Jukka... You know that those things can be found in local spare parts stores around here... really... yeah right! :doh: Now, THAT was a very black moment!

Thank Lucas a hydraulic store was open till 5 pm - and they had suitable connectors for the radiator and oil pump :pray:
 

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You can buy a hydraulic ram at Harbor Freight ( cheap chinese tool outlet ) to push frame rails apart only 1/8 in and the crossmember falls right out, the best $35 I ever spent. This is late news for you but maybe it will help someone else
 

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Discussion Starter #8
classicjack said:
You can buy a hydraulic ram at Harbor Freight ( cheap chinese tool outlet ) to push frame rails apart only 1/8 in and the crossmember falls right out, the best $35 I ever spent. This is late news for you but maybe it will help someone else

Thanks. I'll certainly take a look at it and add it to my "Things to Buy" folder saved under my favorites. Anything to make the job easier in the future is certainly worth considering.

Colin
 

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Discussion Starter #9
TimoV said:
I did the same operation about four months ago. It took me five hours, a ruined t-shirt covered in ATF and lots of elbow grease. I did not remove the exhaust though. Getting the oil pan out was ... well... interesting, at the least. I cursed at least twice and threw a couple of spanners towards Solihull (I don't know whether they hit the target). :roll:

The re-assembly should have been easy - if only the oil pan gasket (the rubber thingy) would have stayed in its place. I think I lost a 4 kg hammer during this operation. It's probably still on its way somewhere over the North Sea.

BUT: It was well worth the effort! The gear changes got considerably smoother and the box operates like an extension of my mind, changing just where and how I want it to change. :dance:

:lol: You did pretty good getting it done in 5 hours! I think that's about how long I spent trying to get the pan out. Everything I used during the process was covered in transmission fluid, including me.

Colin
 

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Popped into my local Dept. store for a top up bottle of ATF-Q Dextron III yesterday (they do all sorts od odd stuff and usually at very good prices) got the top up and asked how much a gallon container would be. Chap said he would check and let me know. He telephoned later and said I should sit down.....

The price? £11.99 for 4.54Ltr (1 gallon)

Orderred two. Just need the service kit now and I can do the autobox service. Am I chuffed

Good tip about the ram I will add it as well.

:pray:
 

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cnfowler said:
I can only imagine what the stealership would charge for this job. Colin
Dealerships, or at least UK dealerships, charge a fixed price depending on the job. There is an application floating around the internet called RTS which is the Jaguar Land Rover repair times searcher. If you look any job up in RAVE, there is a Service Repair Number. If you put this SRN into the RTS, it will tell you how long the dealership should charge you.

My latest version doesn't list the Classic any more, but a ZF unit in a GEMS (94-99) P38 is listed as 0.7hrs under the same Service Repair No as the Classic which is 44.24.07.

I tend to charge like this at the moment. Otherwise, you may as well take your car to a dealer when an independent is going to charge you 3 times the labour time to do the same job.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks, Rich. That's good info to know. Too bad I live over 3 hours away from the nearest stealership.

Colin
 

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Good tip about the Ram, but would the hydraulic wheel jack set on it's side with a wood packing piece do the same job?
 

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Rainbird said:
Good tip about the Ram, but would the hydraulic wheel jack set on it's side with a wood packing piece do the same job?
I'm not sure they work on their side - though I've never tried it.
 

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I tried - mine didn't work... Then it was all hammer-time for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Vogue said:
don't see why not, I have also heard of people using a high lift jack on its side.

I tried this during my adventure and it didn't work for me. Not to mention, it was terrible trying to handle it while lying on my back under the Rover.

Colin
 

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If the hydraulic ones don't work on their side, then a scissor jack might. You only need to move the rails a nads to make a difference.

Got to change the fluid on mine soon, so may give it a go
 
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