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Discussion Starter #1
I have an opportunity to pick a nice set of rims for a fantastic price.
They are 19X8.5 and 19X9,5.
Now I know that running different size of tires is not an option, so providing that I run 275/40/19 all around, I should have no problem, right?
02 P38 HSE
 

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Would have thought on a 19" Rim you would need to run a 45 Profile at least otherwise your overall diameter is far to small, 40 Profile on a 20" Rim.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I supposed you are right, but that I can worry about later, I am just curious if the 1" difference in rim width on the back will make for trouble of sorts with the sensors on the RR.(I doubt it will, but you never know).
 

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That sounds like a pretty bad idea. I won't speak much on the technical aspects of such a set-up, since I do not know the exact adverse effects of staggered wheels. I can't imagine it would be good for the 4-wheel drive system or basic calibration. From a strictly aesthetic stand point, it would most likely look weird, as the front set of wheels would have a bulge of sidewall sticking out beyond the rim. It would look strange.

As to the tires - that would be the incorrect size. A 40 series tire would work with a 20 inch rim but not with a 19 inch rim. The factory size is 255/55/18, so with that set up you mentioned, you would be dropping the overall rolling diameter by well over an inch and a quarter. A 45 series might work better - 275/45/20.

Though this still doesn't account for the staggered set-up question - something I would personally not risk just because I found a decent deal on rims.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well the size is as I said, not of a concern, the tires will be the same on all 4 corners, most likely running 275 45 19.

However, the 1" rim difference(front to back) in theory should not make for any problem, as there are other SUV's that use staggerd set ups(BMW X5 4.6iS, ML55 AMG), in theory, the rolling resistance on all 4 corners will be identical, since the tire will be the same(so it will not affect the calibration or put strain on the T-case IMO). From an aesthetics point of view, the difference will be minimal, i've ran a similar set up before and the bulge was near non existant.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Tim (Scotland) said:
Rolling resistance won't be the same, the bigger tyres will be heavier.
Well, if we think of it like that, then running big mud tires will also cause issues, they are super heavy.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Update: (Incase anyone else is wondering)
After some reading on various different websites I came accross using google search, it seems that:
"Staggered rims are fine as long as the outer diameter of the tires is the same all the way around. "

This means that, if the 4 tires are the same, the width of the rim is irrelevant.
In fact, i could run skinnier rubber on the frong and wider in the rear, PROVIDING, that their outer diameter is the same(not planning that).

Thanks for the info, not sure I'm gonna buy the rims, but they are really nice so we will see..
 

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luvs2getmuddy said:
Tim (Scotland) said:
Rolling resistance won't be the same, the bigger tyres will be heavier.
Well, if we think of it like that, then running big mud tires will also cause issues, they are super heavy.
But the muds would all be the same size.
The rolling resistance difference I was referring to was between the different sized front and rear wheels.

As you probably know the centre diff locks up when it detects a different spin/torque loading/resistance between the front and rear axles.
You may find that having bigger wheels on the back causes the centre diff to prematurely lock up causing tyre wear, driveline damage and interesting handling characteristics.
Or it may be the difference is minimal and the diff ignores it. I don't know how responsive it is.

Is the car up from Texas yet?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Tim (Scotland) said:
luvs2getmuddy said:
[quote="Tim (Scotland)":2hzi33wy]Rolling resistance won't be the same, the bigger tyres will be heavier.
Well, if we think of it like that, then running big mud tires will also cause issues, they are super heavy.
But the muds would all be the same size.
The rolling resistance difference I was referring to was between the different sized front and rear wheels.

As you probably know the centre diff locks up when it detects a different spin/torque loading/resistance between the front and rear axles.
You may find that having bigger wheels on the back causes the centre diff to prematurely lock up causing tyre wear, driveline damage and interesting handling characteristics.
Or it may be the difference is minimal and the diff ignores it. I don't know how responsive it is.

Is the car up from Texas yet?[/quote:2hzi33wy]

Anyday now.

Well the tires will be the same size front and back, its the rims in the back that are wider, so the center diff will not have any clue about anything, according to what ive been reading.
 

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Don't buy staggered rims for your Range.

Here's why: Even if you get all the same sized tires, which will look weird as previously mentioned, they WILL NOT have the same rolling diameter. Tire diameters change with rim widths. It's a simple trigonometry equation, that I dont' know. :think: But just think of it this way... stick both your arms on a table, with your elbows resting on it. They're both the same length, and this represents the tire diameter. Now have one go straight up in the air, and then take your other one and angle it over a couple inches. The overall length from the tip of your finger straight down to the table has changed...slightly, but it's changed.

Anyway...it's a VERY small change, but it's still there, and I wouldn't do it. Plus it will look pretty dumb.
 

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Tim (Scotland) said:
The rolling resistance difference I was referring to was between the different sized front and rear wheels.
kmagnuss said:
they WILL NOT have the same rolling diameter.
Surley the difference would be negligible on a Rim 1" wider, and no different than say having New tyres on the Front and Half worn tyres on the Rear they would have a overall different diameter.

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luvs2getmuddy said:
Well the tires will be the same size front and back, its the rims in the back that are wider, so the center diff will not have any clue about anything, according to what ive been reading.
The rim will be 13% wider at the rear, hence it will be HEAVIER.

Hence there will be an increase in rolling resistance. It's this increase which could cause the diff to lock up.
 

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Tim (Scotland) said:
. It's this increase [in rolling resistance]which could cause the diff to lock up.
I don't see it that way, I agree with the looks silly argument though.

With proper tire selection (not the same front/rear, different widths to match the rims), the diameters will be the same, so the prop-shafts will spin the same speed= VC will not notice. for the VC to lock up,there has to be a difference in ROTATIONAL SPEED of the front/rear wheels, different loading doesn't matter as long as the speeds stay the same, imagine towing a trailer up-hill. since the rear wheels are direct-coupled they receive the lions-share of torque. The rear will have considerably more weight on them because of the added tongue weight of the trailer + the up angle of the hill.

rolling resistance is a function of tire properties, weight on the tire, air pressure and traction. assume the tires, pressure and traction (road surface) are the same (differences would be insignificant in this context), more weight will give more resistance (weight of the wheel is also insignificant in comparison to the weight of the whole Rover, wheel weight will add more angular momentum and decrease acceleration, but I digress......).

So more resistance on the rear wheels, but the VC is still "open" because none are spinning. Hit a patch of mud/ice, the traction on the rear drops significantly, causing spinning, THEN the VC would lock up and drive the front wheels from the engine, most likely spinning as well because of the lower weight=less traction, even if the front tires aren't on the mud/ice.

IMHO, different width rims are OK mechanically (style is a different issue), different diameter tires are a no-no( unless you change your diff ratio to suit.)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Very well put, thank you for the well versed response.

Not sure what I will end up doing, seems the truck has been post poned to get here until tuesday. GRRRRR :evil:
shupack said:
Tim (Scotland) said:
. It's this increase [in rolling resistance]which could cause the diff to lock up.
I don't see it that way, I agree with the looks silly argument though.

With proper tire selection (not the same front/rear, different widths to match the rims), the diameters will be the same, so the prop-shafts will spin the same speed= VC will not notice. for the VC to lock up,there has to be a difference in ROTATIONAL SPEED of the front/rear wheels, different loading doesn't matter as long as the speeds stay the same, imagine towing a trailer up-hill. since the rear wheels are direct-coupled they receive the lions-share of torque. The rear will have considerably more weight on them because of the added tongue weight of the trailer + the up angle of the hill.

rolling resistance is a function of tire properties, weight on the tire, air pressure and traction. assume the tires, pressure and traction (road surface) are the same (differences would be insignificant in this context), more weight will give more resistance (weight of the wheel is also insignificant in comparison to the weight of the whole Rover, wheel weight will add more angular momentum and decrease acceleration, but I digress......).

So more resistance on the rear wheels, but the VC is still "open" because none are spinning. Hit a patch of mud/ice, the traction on the rear drops significantly, causing spinning, THEN the VC would lock up and drive the front wheels from the engine, most likely spinning as well because of the lower weight=less traction, even if the front tires aren't on the mud/ice.

IMHO, different width rims are OK mechanically (style is a different issue), different diameter tires are a no-no( unless you change your diff ratio to suit.)
 

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My GF bought some 20"s for her ML350. (I finally talked her into getting rid of the MB and get an 07 Range YEA but won't let her put rims on it.) She didn't know they were staggered when she bought them. But every shop we took them to to put them on said they wouldn't recommend putting staggered wheels on an all wheel drive.

My personal opinion is what Land Rover put on it looks the best
 
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