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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #1
Someone came to pick up my 2 '95 Classics yesterday. One was a daily driver for my wife up until last year, the other was a parts car. Before these I had a '92 for a while, so probably for the past 15 years or so I've had a Classic around. They've taken us on ski trips, towed our boat to and from the dock, been loaded up for my wife's bakery business, brought our rescue dog home and many other trips in style and comfort. As older cars, they need to be maintained regularly, but the only time one of them left us stuck on the side of the road was when my wife ran out of gas - so not really the cars fault!

Our circumstances changed and we don't need something that big any more (no more bakery business), and I still have an old British car to keep my wrenches busy!

Thanks to the people on this forum, and especially to the people that help run it - without it I'm sure there would be many fewer on the road. Who knows, I may realize my mistake and buy another one at some point in the future.

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Hope your rovers found another good home
I have to say it would have been hard for me to part with those
I still have my old 91
Can’t seem to take that leap
But maybe in the future
You will get another
Good luck with the other British project

Keep lurking
Mike
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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I can’t imagine how difficult it was to make the decision to sell. I am presently in love with my 1995 Classic… I finally hit the sweet spot on the maintenance curve.

Best of luck to you in your next venture!

Chris
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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I know this was a difficult decision, but if you count the amount of time and cost it took you to keep the one road-able RRC running, and if you no longer have a good reason for keeping it, it sounds to me that you made the correct decision.

I have a '95 County LWB that has kept me busy since I bought it from the original owner's son nearly four years ago, and now since I am retired as of last month, I am faced with the same dilemma, whether to keep it and not fix the major things (read costly) that go wrong with it, or sell it now to someone who (thinks they) can maintain it.

Buying anything from Land Rover that's as old as the RRC and has all the known faults is always a crap-shoot. I guess I can say it's a good thing there are people like me who, back in 2007 when I sold my first one that was falling apart, then seven years later just couldn't live without one and bought a low-mileage '95. I'm now thinking that maybe I made a mistake, and I always think that before I see it and climb into it...then I remember how nice it is to have one. :-| I am often my own worst enemy.

Hope all goes well - if you're ever in Silicon Valley, send me a message and I'll let you drive it, if it still runs.
 

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It is an emotional decision to drive a RRC, not a rational one.

I bought a LR3 1 year ago for $8000, 100k miles. Now 127k miles, needing nothing but oil changes and is about the most comfortable car you can imagine. Claiming miles from the company it earned it self back and some. Rational: YES! Emotion: it is a car!

Then I have 1984 RRC which I sank more than $8k into (much more) and the car is only really suitable for leisure trips. Emotional: Totally loving the challenge, the research, the solutions and the satisfaction of it working right. Rational: Why did I even start.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #6
Maybe some small regret, but the reality was it was going to need some welding in the front and rear floors and having just transformed my MG 1100 (below) from a rust-bucket to a finished car I really wasn't ready to go through that again. A couple of rough patches could have got it through safety inspection but I know I wouldn't be able to stop there!

One of my neighbors has one that hasn't run in years, so if I get the urge to work on one again I'm sure he won't complain!

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Discussion Starter #8
Not quite. That was an estate version of basically the same car - re-badged as an Austin instead of an MG.

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One of my neighbors has one that hasn't run in years, so if I get the urge to work on one again I'm sure he won't complain!
That sounds like a good plan - just remember, my RRC is at your disposal if you're ever out west and feel the need to tinker... No welding needed, but the engine, front drive train and suspension can use a hand! :)
 

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Though I'm sure you did the right thing financially, I reckon you will be back!

At 76 years old, I'm now on my 7th and 8th Classic Range Rovers, the last purchased just over a year ago. In my case, put it down to a lack of brains or just to infatuation with these machines.
 
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