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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am test driving a 2001 HSE tomorrow that the seller represents has been well maintained. Even if the seller is telling the truth, there is no warranty as is normally the case with a used car purchase, and as soon as I fork over the cash I am on my own.

This being the case, my only real fear is a slipped sleeve. The myriad of other potential problems are expected and I am prepared to deal with them. But I would like to avoid as best as possible a truck with a slipped sleeve.

Is there a way to check for a slipped sleeve during my inspection process short of having a mechanic inspect it?

I am a pretty capable mechanic and have been wrenching on cars since 1976, and I have not had to hire a mechanic in years. The present stable includes a '99 911 and a '95 840Ci which I do all my own work on, so I am used to the level of technology in the RR.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Hi

The main indication of slipped liner is building up of pressure in the cooling system. After the engine idles and the system gets up to operation temperature try to squeeze the coolant hoses. If these are rock hard then this is an indication that there is trouble with the engine. There is a chemical test that can identify that there are exhaust gasses leaking towards the coolant system in case you are in doubt ask for this test to be done.

Inspect the coolant tank inside it should have clear red or pink colour liquid inside and the inside should look clean without any sludge, foam or suspended solids. They could have added sealer to try to seal up the cracks.

Open the rocker oil top up cap and inspect inside. What you want to see is brown golden coated rocker shafts and rockers. No sludge build up and whitish (mayonaise) coloured oil.

Slipped liner can make a ticking noise when it moves up and down together with the piston.

Good luck

Jos
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover Sport
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After the engine idles and the system gets up to operation temperature try to squeeze the coolant hoses. If these are rock hard then this is an indication that there is trouble with the engine.
Probably not the best advice, since all cooling systems pressurize and the hoses feel near rock hard at operating temp.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Hi

Yes there is some build up of pressure but with rock hard I mean that you can not squeeze the hoses. With hot engine it is still possible to squeeze the hoses without too much force. If they get as hard as a rock in your car, you better check the coolant with the chemical test that I also described.

It is easy to comment: "not the best advice" but where is your better advice?

Best regards

Jos
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I test drove the car today. It was a gold 2001 with 113,000 miles. The seller was asking $4,150 and was located in Livermore. It actually did drive pretty decently.

And I know what you mean about a rock hard coolant hose. This one seemed pretty typical though.

The cold start seemed rough but once it warmed up it smoothed out pretty nice. No weird noises but a slight smell of coolant. The overflow nipple was leaking. The seller had tried to JB weld the nipple on but it was still leaking a little. The seller acted like he didn't know it had been repaired. The drivers door had been hit and the touched up. Not a bad job, but you really can't match the factory paint on an older car.

My biggest complaint about this truck were the rattles and the seller. The seller was dodgy. His story never added up.

On to the next one.
 

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Probably not the best advice, since all cooling systems pressurize and the hoses feel near rock hard at operating temp.
There's a huge huge difference between normal "hot" hoses, and blown HG, or cracked sleeve (as in my case).

Hot is like squeezing a slightly low bike tire- it should feel pressurized, but not hard.

Blown headgasket, or cracked sleeve- the hose will actually bulge, and it feels almost like trying to squeeze one of the vehicles tires.
 
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