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Discussion Starter #1
So....after 3 different diagnostics from mechanics.

All say it is valve stem seal guides and one says valve stem seals.......big clouds of smoke at startup from exhaust. I tried heavier weight oil, lighter weight, amsoil. and some of the additives for stop leak and valve sealing. No luck.

112k miles, runs well except for that and started getting misfires lately on the code reader.

What would you do if you aren't mechanical?

Most mechanics are telling me 3k to 3500 ....I paid 4k for the truck last year.

What would you do if you were me?

Thanks

2003 L322 4.4L
Florida
 

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Have a read and follow this thread. Similar issues and solutions are being discussed that work.


"Without even seeing the vehicle I’d put money on a damaged PCV causing the tailpipe smoke. This is a VERY common failure item on the BMW 4.4 engine, while I haven’t really heard of valve stem seal failures on this particular motor. You may also have a clogged oil seperator. The extra pressure in the system due to the clogged seperator may also contributing to your rear main seal leak."

Just one of the solutions being offered...
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I will bet you you need to replace the PCV plate and do an intake refresh,
stop taking it to mechanics and listen to those that have been down this path
I have no idea how you would even test for bad valve stem seals unless you remove the heads.
Otherwise your spending money for a bogus diagnosis
 

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That's funny, Sam linked you back to your own thread on the same subject. Why the new post? On the other thread someone even directed you to a You Tube video by RSW that tells you what tools you need for the PCV replacement. Not a hard job and an obvious first step before considering ripping into the engine.
 

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That's funny, Sam linked you back to your own thread on the same subject. Why the new post? On the other thread someone even directed you to a You Tube video by RSW that tells you what tools you need for the PCV replacement. Not a hard job and an obvious first step before considering ripping into the engine.
"NorCal RR' I didn't even realize it was the original post. I agree why a new post. That discussion gave allot of solutions options, with some even saying they would do it for him if he was within their local. I shared my experience and it was the PCV. I thought it pretty strange that the Colorado Springs dealership didn't diagnose mine and had to leave it there. I was ready to junk mine and stop spending on anymore on this RR. I'm so glad I changed the PCV.

"davkefl" if you get good advice you should at least listen and try it. Not expensive and with the YouTube video you could do it yourself.
 

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Thanks! Yes I posted twice, it looks like I should go ahead and try the PCV valve replacement first. the mechanic said it wasn't the PCV valve though but I don't know how they tested that.. ?

Is there a way to test it to know if it is bad before I go ahead and replace it
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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Just replace it, they all need doing anyways.
Not expensive, and you can learn how to wrench a little at the same time
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Do something! Start from the cheapest. It’s a metallic box, don’t afraid metal must be afraid
Watch YouTube and read others experiences
Blue puff on cold starts mostly pcv, misfires from the oilseperatoes i thing
Do something, start first than babysteps
 

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Do something! Start from the cheapest. It’s a metallic box, don’t afraid metal must be afraid
Watch YouTube and read others experiences
Blue puff on cold starts mostly pcv, misfires from the oilseperatoes i thing
Do something, start first than babysteps
Definitely have the PCV and related plumbing replaced as others have said. Been there done that. Luckily you're in a warm climate where condensation in PCV plumbing doesn't freeze up overnight and block the whole system, spewing oil out of the weakest point (usually the valve cover gasket). Good luck. A tough DIY but not horrible.
 
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