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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Apologies in advance if this is a dumb question. I have access to a standard two-post automotive lift at my friend's garage. Last week when I lifted my L322 by chassis jack points to take off wheels, the suspension well... suspended under its weight and air springs extended to their max both in the front and rear. There were no visible negative effects that I could see, and once back on the ground EAS compensated and got itself back leveled, but I'm wondering if there's a more safer way to lift these beasts? I did a search and some are saying to lock the suspension in its lowest (access mode) position, while others are advising the opposite "full off-road" height, but in either case I don't see how system would be strong enough to combat the weight of the suspension and gravity and not sag all way done in either setting.
Is it necessary to lift these on a chassis lift to avoid this? And if so, what are the lifting points to use? Factory lifting "pucks" are positioned on the body of the truck and not on the chassis, so lifting the truck by those, even on a chassis lift, won't make any difference.
Thanks in advance!
 

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The long and short is that if your rig is factory you are not going to do damage using "frame" lift equipment. The bags and sensors still have travel when the rear shocks and front struts max out. The shock and strut will easily carry the weight of each corner's suspension tyre and wheel. However if your shocks and struts are high mileage you may be pushing it. If your suspension has been modified, or you have ridiculously oversized/overweight rims then you could be pushing it as well.

As far as locking the suspension in any mode... that is laughably ridiculous. EAS operates on air pressure holding UP the weight of the vehicle. The weight off the suspension will extend the bags no matter what setting they are in.

General rule of thumb is track lift is preferred for regular maintenance work or under carriage repairs. Jack lift is preferred for brakes, tyre/rim changes or suspension repairs.
 
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