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Discussion Starter #1
While I love the current-gen L405/L494, the Range Rover Classic has always been my favorite Rover, and it is always nice to see a well-kept example on the road still being enjoyed. While the inverse of that is always sad to see.

Was filling up at the “Gas Station” in Philo, CA and in the corner of my eye I see an old neglected Classic deteriorating into the brush. I always wonder what the story is of the car, and how it came to arrive in the middle of nowhere CA. :(
 

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That is a shame
For sure
I could use the rear bumper
 

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As I can testify, even a nice looking and cheap car can be a real pain to restore. Normally everything needs work and by the time you add it up you might as well have purchased a more expensive running car. It is fun to restore and bring back to life an old an abandoned car for sure, but between the effort and cost it has to be a labour of love.

Far too few old range rovers around in Houston Texas. I could do with a good pick 'n pull for the missing bits on my car. Although I think that on most cars the rear quarter window rubbers will all be shot. $450 for a new set, ouch!
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Where did you find the window rubbers? I need to replace mine.


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Discussion Starter #7
How do you folks source old parts like the electrics? I imagine the ECU chips, and the electrics that control the EAS haven’t been reverse-engineered and remanufactured, and the supply of original chips are all suffering the fate of time.
 

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As I can testify, even a nice looking and cheap car can be a real pain to restore. Normally everything needs work and by the time you add it up you might as well have purchased a more expensive running car. It is fun to restore and bring back to life an old an abandoned car for sure, but between the effort and cost it has to be a labour of love.
How very true and to take on such a job, you need lots of available time, persistence and money. A lot of the work is in finding replacements for the missing or broken components. I have had 7 Classic Range Rovers (2 currently) plus one P38 and have learned the hard way how difficult it can be to find many of the necessary parts though ironically, the earlier models are easier then the later ones.

The two current vehicles prove this point - one is a 91 Hi-Line - pre-ABS, coil springs and relatively limited electronics. There have been several maintenance issues but all straightforward and with easily obtainable parts - like suspension bushes, a transfer case, track rod ends, viscous fan coupling etc. The other one is a 93 Vogue SE and the PO changed the engine for a completely rebuilt 4.6 with top hat liners, also dual fuel and it tuns beautifully. BUT - the electrical/electronic problems have been a nightmare. Have had to replace the seat switches with DIY versions, repair the radio, change the central locking motor for Disco ones, fix the air conditioning, replace fan resistor pack and worst of all, the ABS pump, motor and accumulator (the classic components are virtually unobtainable) so I replaced most with P38 ones. The cruise control and mirror controls still don't work.

So far, so good and most things now work - though not to original specs and a $5k car now owes me $10k.

Welcome to Classic Range Rover ownership! Problem is, when you have owned several, you will not want to drive anything else
 

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How do you folks source old parts like the electrics? I imagine the ECU chips, and the electrics that control the EAS haven’t been reverse-engineered and remanufactured, and the supply of original chips are all suffering the fate of time.
There aren't many electronics in the classics. EAS controller problems are rare, and are often fixed by swapping out to coil springs, providing a generous supply of EAS controllers. Radios can be fixed by a fellow in the US (GB4x4radio.com or something like that). ECUs are widely available. I think there are posts on how to fix memory-seat ECUs. The rest is just old fashioned relays and switches.

The P38 forum is where you want to go to hear about electronic woes.
 

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I think there are posts on how to fix memory-seat ECUs. The rest is just old fashioned relays and switches.
Afraid I disagree - the early models are fine, but the later ones can be a nightmare. True- there is plenty of information but just try to do it! The switch-pack itself has a wonderful habit of dumping the ball bearings that sit on the springs, regardless of using Vaseline to hold them and however careful you are when replacing the cover. Do not be surprised if it takes many attempts to get this right and even so, a week or X later, the old problem will recur, meaning mirrors move, but not the seats.

The seat ECU is just as big a pain. Just getting it off is not easy. Repairing board/component damage and then changing the battery is doable, but again - not guaranteed to work. The better options are to swap the controls for P38 ones or bypass the system with polarity-reversing switches.

A further note too about the Wabco ABS system. The parts for the 92-93 Classic are virtually unobtainable. Changing to the P38 pump and motor is a much better option but to do it correctly the old accumulator needs to be removed and new brackets. a T-piece and brake pipes fabricated. The option is to leave the old accumulator and brake lines in place and connect the P38 pump and motor to the existing T-piece. It means that TWO accumulators are in the system instead on one. This is a very simple job and requires fabrication only of one new mount for the pump. The existing braided line is simply moved onto the banjo fitting of the P38 pump. It cost me $A300 for a used P38 pump and motor. Fitting took only 20 minutes and it works perfectly!

The moral of this tale is to be a bit inventive. Otherwise, get a new bank loan or buy a Toyota
 

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Far too few old range rovers around in Houston Texas. I could do with a good pick 'n pull for the missing bits on my car. Although I think that on most cars the rear quarter window rubbers will all be shot. $450 for a new set, ouch!
Ain't that the truth?! It's hard enough to find a Disco 1 let alone a RRC.
 
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