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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #1
My search skills are rubbish i know,,,,, uk 4.6 eas compressor running continously pretty much - piston seal cream crackered replaced still keen to run way too long swapped for known good compressor - sorted but then an eas fault cropped up - hadn;t had to use my RSW software for years (also have an MSV EXTREME) and couldn't initially find the handbook i downloaded so played with what i could remember and ended up deleting all settings then used figures that gave me way off settings and eventually standard setting that was akin to extended height now found the electronic handbook but cannot see where it mentions what the HEIGHTS tab would be used for to get heights when the CALIBRATE does this doesn't it? and i'm confused about what, on the FAULTS tab the boxes labelled F8 F9 FA FB and FC mean... any ideas anyone please
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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3,952 Posts
The F8, etc boxes are simply hexadecimal addresses, with no stored faults all should be showing 00. To calibrate you need a set of calibration blocks. Place each block for one height in the bumpstops and let the car sit on those, go to the Heights tab and read off what each height sensor is reporting then save that in the relevant box in the Calibrate tab. Do the same for all 4 heights. See http://www.rangerovers.net/forum/7-range-rover-mark-ii-p38/73321-eas-calibration-blocks.html for dimensions for the calibration blocks.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #3
cheers i'm off the brave the wind and rain here in stormy Goole and do some initial measuring
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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1,426 Posts
Using Faultmate your standard height settings should be in the range 105 to 110 all round.

You can then adjust them as necessary to get the car level using either blocks or a tape measure.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #6
excellent all - thanks - faults showing all inlet valves shut but as the handbook says beware of these faults - now i know and have confidence in depressurising bags and tank and have a pressure gauge with a length of pipe i'll do the basics and check pressure losses on each bag / tank maybe cheat and just swap the whole valvepack/compressor from my previous car with the overheated engine that I was supposed to get off the drive a year ago (9 cars inc daughters boyfriends car and a horse trailer on a modern house drive way is starting to look like an NCP car park)
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Pressure gauge won't tell you anything. The pressure in the springs is generated by the weight of the car, more weight and the pressure goes up, less weight and it drops. It isn't pressure that the system uses, it is volume of air. So you could have a car with one leaking air spring but it will show the same pressure as all the others until that corner hits the bump stops. If you are looking for a leak, a squirty bottle with a water/Fairy Liquid mix will show even the tiniest leak. If the air springs have been replaced with cheapo ones rather than Dunlop OEM, some makes only have one O ring rather than 2 where the pipe goes in and hardly ever seal fully. Or it could be as simple as perished air springs that have gone porous.
 
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