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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #1
Having issues with the suspension again.....check engine light is off but air suspension has been disabled. Here is what the software is showing me



This is also showing on the left rear under the live data:



Air spring, maybe?


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Discussion Starter #2
As a note I forgot to mention my air compressor was rebuilt using bagpipeandy's kit, I could hear it struggling and pumping intermittently, then it locked back down again. Back is drive able but lower than I am comfortable driving. The parking sensors are going nuts all of the sudden as well.


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Discussion Starter #3
Issues again with EAS, found fault come

I posted this several days earlier but nobody replied and I need a second opinion. I am moving out of state with my wife on the 31st and I need some clarification of a fault code that the RSW Allcomms found. I need to take care of this because we are moving back in less than 5 days. This is what I found:

-Too much energy for regulation needed, rear left

Before this it was acting up but spit out different fault codes. After I cleared them, I could hear my rebuilt air compressor fire up and seem to be working a little harder than usual, then the rear sags down and locks down into the dreaded EAS inactive hard/software lock. Thankfully I have the software to see what's up, but after clearing the code twice this just did not go away. I feel that the left rear has given up, because under live data for the EAS the rear left was showing a value of 0.

I would prefer to replace both rears, but my budget is limited. I have no real idea if there is anything else causing this, but this is the only thing showing on Allcomms and from what I have read that means it is a failed air spring.

I can buy a good name brand one and just replace what is having issues, or I could resort to eBay and get a nameless pair from who knows where.

Just have a few days before we leave, so I need to come up with an attack plan. Any help or advice appreciated. Thanks.


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Premium Member
2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Re: Issues again with EAS, found fault come

I posted this several days earlier but nobody replied and I need a second opinion. I am moving out of state with my wife on the 31st and I need some clarification of a fault code that the RSW Allcomms found. I need to take care of this because we are moving back in less than 5 days. This is what I found:

-Too much energy for regulation needed, rear left

Before this it was acting up but spit out different fault codes. After I cleared them, I could hear my rebuilt air compressor fire up and seem to be working a little harder than usual, then the rear sags down and locks down into the dreaded EAS inactive hard/software lock. Thankfully I have the software to see what's up, but after clearing the code twice this just did not go away. I feel that the left rear has given up, because under live data for the EAS the rear left was showing a value of 0.

I would prefer to replace both rears, but my budget is limited. I have no real idea if there is anything else causing this, but this is the only thing showing on Allcomms and from what I have read that means it is a failed air spring.

I can buy a good name brand one and just replace what is having issues, or I could resort to eBay and get a nameless pair from who knows where.

Just have a few days before we leave, so I need to come up with an attack plan. Any help or advice appreciated. Thanks.


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It's telling you that given the energy it has expended (filling the bag) the level sensor(s) have detected that the vehicle hasn't raised sufficiently. The only time I had this on my range rover is when I had a very heavy trailer that caused it to lift a bit....slowly.
 

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Re: Issues again with EAS, found fault come

If you get a very different reading on only one corner while the vehicle is actually level then it would certainly be a sensor problem, regardless of whether or not there is also an air problem. If on the other hand the readings are tallying with what the actual vehicle height is then it is less likley to be a sensor problem, though there still remains the possibility of an intermittent problem and you just haven't caught it red handed yet.

The 'too much energy' fault can sometimes be caused by a faulty sensor but it in that case would typically be accompanied by a more explicit sensor fault code and/or an articulation plausibility fault code. My guess is that the zero reading you see is actually telling you that the sensor is OK but we cannot be sure until we see the readings of all four sensors at each height setting.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
What kind of frustrated me is I know something is up, because even though the back is sagging back to the bottom of the ground, the fault codes keep bringing up different issues. One of them was saying the left rear is having issues. On top of that, I can hear the compressor doing its job (rebuilt with the bagpipeandy's kit) but yet the back does not raise. On the center console the switch to raise and drop the vehicle is active. There is no Air suspension inactive warning. I strongly feel a big part of the problem is the back left air spring, but other than that one code pertaining to that is not showing up now. What I am a little concerned at this point is it could mean more than a rear air spring issue. On top of that, I leave for Idaho on Friday. Have to figure out what next if the air spring replacement on the back leftis not the problem.

Also if the back left is leaking, would that cause the passenger rear of the vehicle to sag almost to the ground evenly, even if possibly the right rear is NOT faulty?

I am also seeing the following numeric values through live data from the air suspension through the RSW solutions software. each corner of the vehicle is reporting as follows:

Left front: 11516
Right front: 3
Left rear: 0
Right rear: 3072

Hope that helps. The software kit I got has tons of other ways to see things on the L322 as well. If any other ideas are considered those could possibly be looked at as well.




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A leaky airbag will not necessarily cause the vehicle to tilt to one side because the ECU will try to compensate by reducing the air in the diagonally opposite bag and you end up with all the car's weight resting on the two diagonally opposite wheels. This can sometimes hide the issue of a leaky bag for some time. Unfortunately it also makes the car very unsafe without warning since the car's weight is not properly distributed over all four wheels.

I am finding it difficult to understand the height readings you are getting, they are all over the place. Unfortunately I'm not familiar with RSW so I'm not sure what they are indicating.
On IIDtool I simply get the offset in millimeters from the standard height position, so for instance in access height I would get approx -50 on each corner give or take a few mm, so evidently the RSW works very differently as otherwise it would be showing an articulation of 12 meters. Can you check in the RSW manuals what the readings actually mean? The readings may or may not be indicating faulty height sensors but unless we know how to interpret the numbers that is impossible to tell.

Faulty height sensors will easily cause the 'too much energy' fault code as well as a variety of others. The sensor will not necessarily fail in a way that the ECU will know it is faulty in which case the ECU will believe the reading even though it is incorrect and will do silly things.
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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If money is tight, and you suspect the bags, have you sprayed them all down, in all heights??
The RSW stuff simply gives a unit from the height sensor, like most other readers.

Martin
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I am still at sort of a loss why all four corners of the car are showing up different values.

I am a little concerned if even a new air spring and height sensor will solve this. The days are counting down, and even more frustrating is the RSW diagnostics now shows no fault codes. Yet, the ride height and suspension are acting as if it is running fine. Yet the back will not raise, no matter how hard I try and even when the air compressor is active.
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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If one end is lower, the height values from the RSW HAVE to be lower there, regardless of faults listed.
Basically, if the sensors are within range, no faults will be given.
All four corners, to a certain extent will give different values. A small difference in bolt hole centers for the sensors, and so on, will make them read differently for a given height. Thus why you measure heights and enter new values when fitting new height sensors, but not new bags.

Martin
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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And although I have the RSW thing, I hardly use it, preferring TekPro and Faultmate. Is there a setting for the EAS to send it to a certain height? I know on the Faultmate, you can open and close each valve in the valve block, send it to high, send it to access, turn the compressor on and off, and so on.

Martin
 

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Discussion Starter #12
And although I have the RSW thing, I hardly use it, preferring TekPro and Faultmate. Is there a setting for the EAS to send it to a certain height? I know on the Faultmate, you can open and close each valve in the valve block, send it to high, send it to access, turn the compressor on and off, and so on.

Martin
There is actually an "expert mode" which allows you to manually input individual values on each corner on the air suspension. However how to attempt that, I have no idea. It does give the option though

If anything can think of anything else too, I'd be grateful. Stressing really bad because the days are counting and there is no clear answer what is causing this.

In other news, I am halfway done replacing the crankcase ventilation valve. Glad I serviced it because it looked like it was the original and it was severely damaged.


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JACK'S GRANDAD
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If you want, I can read the values on our 03 with the RSW thing tomorrow. Then you can enter those values and see where it ends up. It's to the point where you are going to have to enter some values though, to see what works and what doesnt.

Martin
 

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Discussion Starter #14
If you want, I can read the values on our 03 with the RSW thing tomorrow. Then you can enter those values and see where it ends up. It's to the point where you are going to have to enter some values though, to see what works and what doesnt.

Martin
Thanks, that would help a lot. I need values for all four corners. Once that happens I'll see what happens.


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Discussion Starter #16
I ended up having to take it into a local fabrication shop after I moved out to Idaho and had the vehicle transported here. The backs were definitely bad, but that was the beginning of the nightmare. When I got it back the compressor I rebuilt had blown open and seized up. Bought a 2nd compressor, new air pressure relief valve....only for the shop determining the body control module was not operating properly and there was a major electrical ghost they couldn't track down. The pump would prime and kick on but it wasn't getting a signal to kick off from the module itself. They tried their best to repair the factory system after advising me a manual bypass would be a lot less headache and just resolve the issue. They had to do a manual bypass by manually connecting both front and rear air lines. It isn't their fault but even after bypassing the system they are still having issues getting the rears to keep up, they're trying to track down why it won't keep pressure as everything is new or has been replaced. They ended up doing an exhaust too but because we are in the middle of nowhere their welder went out and they are trying to source it out.

I will no longer be able to adjust it from inside the vehicle but in the end once they find the last leak they will keep PSI and if need be I can add or drop pressure using a standard air hose at a gas station.

Still don't have it back but when I get it back I plan to order a custom UK euro plate that says "EAS FAILD". Gotta have some humor when these things timely fail and you want to kick the front bumper off with your foot.

At least it will sound good when I get it back. Also ran a car fax on my car and despite all the abuse it went through I am the second owner, lol.

Edit: they just called me, found the leak just making sure that it will hold the proper PSI.


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Jenz. Sorry to hear this. A couple thoghts.

Don't link anything and just add a manual bypass at the front block where you can inflate using outboard air.

This is a fairly common mod on p38s and I had one. One thing I learned running an eas bypass kit is that the air suspension leaks a bit. Not a lot but just enough to blow off stress. I would expect after a few weeks you'd be looking at topping off a bypassed system.

If properly done (do not link anything get independent valves for each corner), some ways a bypassed system is a bypasses system is nice but you have to bring an aircompressor if offroading or leaving your car for a few weeks or more.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Since I have no electronic system to regulate air bag pressure, how do I know what the proper ride height is when I fill it up? Either by PSI or eyeballing it? Don't want to put too much in and blow the bags.

As much as I didn't want to go this route, I live in a small remote college town in eastern Idaho and repair options are severely limited. While the shop had a copy of the L322 RAVE manual and the RSW solutions software that I provided them, which helped them out a lot, there was only so much they could do given their lack of experience working on the vehicle and the nearest Land Rover dealership being nearly 5 hours away to the west in Boise. Only shop here in town that didn't have Chevrolet on the brain and was willing to work on it. Learned when you move to a small town where I am for now there is a lot of bigotry towards anyone who owns something foreign and why I have no idea.


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JACK'S GRANDAD
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So a "fab" shop in Idaho couldn't fix a Range Rover, so you let them bypass the EAS? Wow.
Sorry to say this, but if they didn't have the right computers to work on it, they probably didn't/don't have a raving clue what they are doing. No doubt some decent guys etc, but Rover guys they aren't.

Martin
 

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Premium Member
2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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You still show Denver as your location and "small remote eastern Idaho town" helps us little in trying to find a nearby shop familiar with and equipped to service Land Rovers, but one or more of those linked to below might be close enough to be worth investigating should you decide having an uncompromised ride is worth striving for....

Sutton Auto-Tech, 1230 N Skyline Drive, Idaho Falls, 208-529-4660.

http://www.suttonautorepair.com

http://www.lrshops.com/idaho/sutton-...idaho-falls-id

Found using http://www.lrshops.com

Report back with results should you enlist their services....
 
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