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Discussion Starter #1
Just bought a 1991 RRC that I'm importing from sunny Spain to rainy Seattle. Based on many photos, it looks to be rust-free. I hope to keep it that way.

We don't salt the roads up here because it rarely snows. And I won't be doing any serious off-roading--just the occasional dirt Forest Service road. But it does rain a lot here, and unfortunately, I don't have a garage, so my new truck will be wet a lot of the time.

I've read a bit about Waxoyl and Dinitrol, and both seem to have their advocates. But these may be overkill for my use and the conditions here. And it may not address some of the issues I'm worried about (water seeping into problem areas like the doors and tailgate).

I'm also not looking to do major disassembly. Looking for practical, not-too-expensive solutions.

Any advice on how to keep my new truck rust and corrosion free?

Thanks!

287673
 

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From the body's perspective and not the chassis, immediately behind the front wheels (the area where your feet are located inside) is vulnerable from it's vertical face and following right down underneath to the flat floor needs careful inspection, base treatment of rusting, painting with decent paint to protect, then under seal type coating for long term protection of the paint"s integrity.

Check under front carpets and sound deadening internally for damp and corrosion (it'll rust from interior outward if left unchecked) and refinish to preserve integrity.

Going reward from here, the cills, box sections and body support outrigger structures (they bolt the body to the chassis) need careful inspection, preservation treatment inside the boxes (some entry points exist under carpets) to best preserve.

Underside of rear wheel arches, they are seemed with the seam running around tire centre line. Sealant and paint failure in the seam crevice will need to be closely inspected to verify condition and integrity.

Rear floor load area, the seams down both sides are vulnerable so look from underneath and treat as above.

The rear cross member, look between tail gate base and bumper as it's visible there, again close inspection and application of appropriate protection. Plus internal treatment.

Doors and tail gate, make sure base drain points are clear, treating with "waxoil" and then again making sure drainage is not compromised.
 

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Classic car ownership without a garage is going to be a frustrating affair. I could not wait buy my first house with a garage. Now I have one that takes 4 cars. Perfect.

I know it can be costly, but look at renting a lockup. Your car is not going to last long standing in the rain.
 

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If no garage, what about a temporary shelter/carport? One of those tubular structures with a tarp-like roof? Anything is better than Seattle rain mixed with salty air near the coast.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the advice. I have a parking space in my office garage where I can keep it during the rainiest months. But I live in an apartment with only street parking so not a lot of other options. No real parking garage options nearby as I'm in a very residential area. Treating this as my semi-daily driver so trying to come up with practical solutions where I'm not constantly worried about it.
 

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In that case I'd definitely go with the fluid film, good stuff, and at least will slow the inevitable march of rust
 

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I've been researching the same thing and have been curious about strategies involving linseed oil. Non-toxic with a long history.
 

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Treat any existing rust first with POR 15 or Eastwood products. Then perhaps some Fluid Film or Cosmoline RP-342.
 

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Just bought a 1991 RRC that I'm importing from sunny Spain to rainy Seattle. Based on many photos, it looks to be rust-free. I hope to keep it that way.

We don't salt the roads up here because it rarely snows. And I won't be doing any serious off-roading--just the occasional dirt Forest Service road. But it does rain a lot here, and unfortunately, I don't have a garage, so my new truck will be wet a lot of the time.

I've read a bit about Waxoyl and Dinitrol, and both seem to have their advocates. But these may be overkill for my use and the conditions here. And it may not address some of the issues I'm worried about (water seeping into problem areas like the doors and tailgate).

I'm also not looking to do major disassembly. Looking for practical, not-too-expensive solutions.

Any advice on how to keep my new truck rust and corrosion free?

Thanks!

View attachment 287673
Check your battery tray and under the hood, facing the car, to the right, opposite to the water reservoir for the window washer, theres a water trap there - i sanded mine back and treated it and its been fine. Deeper stuff would be behind the vinyl columns at the back and also tailgate hinges.
The floor pans should be OK, but pull the carpets back and have a look just in case. If there was a leak at a heater matrix - the fluid will be under there as will any residue of a repaired HM.

great looking car

S
 

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where in Seattle? pending the neighborhood, I might know a place or two.

I bought a 93 LWB years back that the previous owner had Waxoyl treatment done. I was surprised how clean that truck was and free of any rust whatsoever. Should never have sold it. I know its expensive, and with the lack of snow might overkill, but it did what was needed for years on east coast.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
where in Seattle? pending the neighborhood, I might know a place or two.

I bought a 93 LWB years back that the previous owner had Waxoyl treatment done. I was surprised how clean that truck was and free of any rust whatsoever. Should never have sold it. I know its expensive, and with the lack of snow might overkill, but it did what was needed for years on east coast.
I'm in Phinney Ridge, right by the zoo. I've heard good things about Waxoyl, but like anything on the internet there's lots of debate.
 

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I'm in Phinney Ridge, right by the zoo. I've heard good things about Waxoyl, but like anything on the internet there's lots of debate.
Red Mill....mmmmm

No luck for the spare spot unfortunately. They'd be too far.

It's not cheap, Waxoyl, but I was impressed.
 

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Unsure of comparisons to other products, but as apolillo states, waxoil seems to last well and particularly within closed box sections like the sills etc.
 
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