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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys – I've had an overheating problem since I've had my truck, so finding better ways to cool the sucker are very interesting to me. Once I sort out my issue, I'm going to be looking at better ways to cool the system.

Options I know of are
  • bigger radiator
  • secondary radiator
  • electric water pump
  • electric (VC) fan
  • bigger electric condenser fans
I'd love to know what you've done or any ideas you have. Please, pics, costs & part numbers!
 

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Perhaps getting to the root of the issue instead of compensating for the issue would be a better idea. None of my Classics have ever overheated and that includes one trip to Charlotte from Palm Springs with temps regularly over 100 for much of the trip with A/C on high.

You have several threads going at the same time all revolving around your overheating. Might I suggest picking one and sticking with it? Keeping things in one stream of info eliminates folks asking the same questions and posting the same suggestions over an over between threads.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Perhaps getting to the root of the issue instead of compensating for the issue would be a better idea.
I agree. That's why i said "Once I sort out my issue".

None of my Classics have ever overheated and that includes one trip to Charlotte from Palm Springs with temps regularly over 100 for much of the trip with A/C on high.
Based on my own experience, I almost don't believe you ;-)

You have several threads going at the same time all revolving around your overheating.

Might I suggest picking one and sticking with it? Keeping things in one stream of info eliminates folks asking the same questions and posting the same suggestions over an over between threads.
Sorry Toad.. it's gotten a little messy granted. While trying to keep issues separated, the fact that they'r interrelated has made it messy. But in this thread I'm not talking about my issue, I'm asking others what they have done to make the cooling system more robust. I think it's a fair question that many would be interested in without listening to problems about my specific truck. If you don't think it's valuable that's fine, please delete it, and I'll be happy to re-post it in one of my other threads about overheating.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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I'll agree with RRToadHall, fix the underlying problem. I regularly used to tow a 3 tonne trailer from UK to the south of France, a 2,000 mile round trip with a '93 4.2 Classic LSE. In summer the ambient temperature would regularly be over 35 degrees C, sometimes hitting 40 C. At that sort of temperature the A/C was on all journey and I never had any overheating problems. If you have then there is something wrong. Failed VC, clogged radiator or liner problems would be my guess.
 

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Perhaps getting to the root of the issue instead of compensating for the issue would be a better idea. None of my Classics have ever overheated and that includes one trip to Charlotte from Palm Springs with temps regularly over 100 for much of the trip with A/C on high.

You have several threads going at the same time all revolving around your overheating. Might I suggest picking one and sticking with it? Keeping things in one stream of info eliminates folks asking the same questions and posting the same suggestions over an over between threads.
I 2nd. You need to figure out what the cause is with the existing system.

You could put a bigger radiator in but that won't fix a leaky head gasket. you could put an electric water pump on it but that won't fix a leaky thermostat housing. You could put in bigger more powerful fans but that won't make up for a clogged radiator...
 

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Ha! I'll bite.

My rover overheated in -43 degrees. That's in Celsius, not that it really matters at those temperatures. Seems the thermostat decided to permanently place itself into the closed position. Lost a couple hoses in the process. I had a mechanic install a new thermostat. Been great ever since.

Metal starts to do funny things at that temperature.
 

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I know you probably don't believe it, but these trucks have very good cooling systems when they are in proper working condition. I've owned four and once sorted they could idle with the ac on in 120 degree temperatures in Las Vegas while maintaining thermostat temperature. If you are having overheating problems there is either something wrong with your cooling system or something wrong internally in the engine itself. These trucks are aging and need the whole cooling system gone through including a recored stock radiator, new fan clutch, water pump, thermostat and all the hoses, and probably the heater core isn't a bad idea either.
 

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I know you probably don't believe it, but these trucks have very good cooling systems when they are in proper working condition. I've owned four and once sorted they could idle with the ac on in 120 degree temperatures in Las Vegas while maintaining thermostat temperature.
LV, Cheyenne, Palm Springs, Phoenix, ElPaso, Mephis, ... Just a hand full of the places I have spent time in Classics and never had an issue during hot weather. If you are having overheat issues in Spring in your area I would imagine you have at least one component of your cooling system in poor condition or you have bigger engine issues afoot.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ok, looks like you were right Toad - this somehow turned into a thread about my overheating problem ;-)

So everyone thinks that the RRC cooling system is fine as it is. I can accept that. Like I said, I know my truck has issues that I need to fix, which I'm doing now. And I fully expect it to cool itself just fine when everything is working properly. Always did. That's not why I asked this question.
 

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I use to have a P76 V8 in the Rangie. This is a 4.4 based closely on a Rover V8. They were well known for running hot. I did a few things to cool it down. First was thermo fans, Next was tapping a small coolant line into the back of the intake manifold where it bolts to the head. You will notice that the coolant comes out of the motor and into the intake manifold at the front of the intake manifold where i bolts to the head. The same coolant gallery is at the rear of the head but blocked off by the intake manifold. This can cause air pockets in that part of the head. By tapping a small coolant line into the intake manifold, it allows the air to get out of that position. Finally, I put vents in the hood (as per photo below) to allow the hot air out from under the hood.

All these things made modest improvements in the running temp of the car, but never really solved the problem completely. I could never run the air-con on a really hot day.

You could also try something like this http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Range-Rover-Classic-PWR-custom-made-aluminium-radiator-/261449722097?pt=AU_Car_Parts_Accessories&hash=item3cdf9e28f1&_uhb=1
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I use to have a P76 V8 in the Rangie. This is a 4.4 based closely on a Rover V8. They were well known for running hot. I did a few things to cool it down. First was thermo fans, Next was tapping a small coolant line into the back of the intake manifold where it bolts to the head. You will notice that the coolant comes out of the motor and into the intake manifold at the front of the intake manifold where i bolts to the head. The same coolant gallery is at the rear of the head but blocked off by the intake manifold. This can cause air pockets in that part of the head. By tapping a small coolant line into the intake manifold, it allows the air to get out of that position. Finally, I put vents in the hood (as per photo below) to allow the hot air out from under the hood.

All these things made modest improvements in the running temp of the car, but never really solved the problem completely. I could never run the air-con on a really hot day.

You could also try something like this http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Range-Rover-Classic-PWR-custom-made-aluminium-radiator-/261449722097?pt=AU_Car_Parts_Accessories&hash=item3cdf9e28f1&_uhb=1
Interesting p76, it seems like one of the difficult issues of the 4.2 is air trapping in the coolant system. Some sort of bleed at the high point(s) seems a reasonable mod. The 4.2 doesn't have the typical coolant filler neck next to the plenum, so I'm basically left to fill at points lower than some hoses, unless I want to fill directly into hoses which doesn't sound like a good idea.

Re Mr Clarkson putting vents in the bonnet... I've never seen enough heat generated under my hood under healthy conditions, personally, that would warrant something like that. Although, they do crazy things on that show all the time ;-) and not all engines are created equal.

What did your P76 comes out of? Not a TVR?

Part of me is tempted to have a custom radiator built that can handle more heat and put in a BAEF (big arse electric fan), even if my truck is running fine because the aluminum is so finicky, like a precautionary measure in case one time I don't catch her overheating before it's too late.
 

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What did your P76 comes out of? Not a TVR?
It is a Rover based 4.4 V8. It came out of a Leyland P76 Car http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leyland_P76

In my Rangie ute I was having cooling issues even though I had transferred everything directly from the 93, it was running hotter on the highway than the 93 use to. Did a couple of mods to stop the air going around the radiator rather than thru it and have dropped the highway running temp by over 15F.
 

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The 4.2 doesn't have the typical coolant filler neck next to the plenum
Well it should have, somebody must have taken it off. My '93 4.2 LSE certainly did have it and you will never be able to bleed all the air out of the system without it.

Overheating may be the symptom or the cause, you need to work out which. It may be that the engine is overheating because it can (failed thermostat?) and the excessive heat is causing the coolant to be forced out. This means the overheating is the cause although if your engine is good then it is unlikely. Or, far more likely, due to airlocks in the cooling system, combustion gases from a liner or head gasket problem or something similar are pressurising the cooling system forcing coolant out so the engine overheats due to insufficient coolant. Then the overheating is the symptom and the loss of coolant is the cause. You have to work out which but my money would be on the overheating being the symptom.

First thing would be to fit the bleed chimney to the hoses alongside the plenum. If you can't get hold of the real thing, make one up from copper domestic plumbing pipe (assuming you use 15 and 19mm copper plumbing pipe in the USA) using a T piece and some sort of stop on the end. That will allow you to get the air out of the system. Then fit a new pressure cap on the coolant reservoir to make sure the system can pressurise without blowing the coolant out.
 

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Well it should have, somebody must have taken it off. My '93 4.2 LSE certainly did have it and you will never be able to bleed all the air out of the system without it.
Your 93 would have had it, however the 95 does not. that is one of the changes that was incorporated at the same time as the update to the serpentine belt.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
It is a Rover based 4.4 V8. It came out of a Leyland P76 Car http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leyland_P76

In my Rangie ute I was having cooling issues even though I had transferred everything directly from the 93, it was running hotter on the highway than the 93 use to. Did a couple of mods to stop the air going around the radiator rather than thru it and have dropped the highway running temp by over 15F.
Very interesting. Specifically what did you do to keep air going through the rad? Just block everything around it, or did you make some sort of funnel?

That p76 is awesome. Heard of BL, but I don't think I've ever seen on in person.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
First thing would be to fit the bleed chimney to the hoses alongside the plenum. If you can't get hold of the real thing, make one up from copper domestic plumbing pipe (assuming you use 15 and 19mm copper plumbing pipe in the USA) using a T piece and some sort of stop on the end. That will allow you to get the air out of the system. Then fit a new pressure cap on the coolant reservoir to make sure the system can pressurise without blowing the coolant out.
I've never seen this bleed chimney, but I've heard of it. The highest point of my cooling system is the plenum, then the upper rad hose I think. My expansion tank cap was replaced with OE new about 50 miles ago and seems to be working well.

I could use some more info about fitting some bleed chimney, if it's necessary. It seems like it is, because air pockets are the only thing I can think of at this point. The only thing I haven't checked is my heater core & lines, but I've never had any liquid in the footwells.
 
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