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Discussion Starter #1
Good Morning all,

Just purchased a 2000 P38 and love it. It's not my first rover, so I'm familiar with their quirks.

Like the title says, does anyone have a link or copy of Rover Raiser instructions or a manual? Or if not, could some one point me the right direction?

I have googled but have come up with only one hit that sent me to this website.


Thanks in advance,
 

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Those were made by Scotty, could try a search, a long term member here. I only used them for diagnostic purposes and then unhooked the lines, it created too many more chances for leaks. There is one air fitting for each bag, red green blue and black marked lines I think, and then a connection for the pressure tank. I think they all use 6mm connections. Someone else here mentioned going to the brass 6mm tee connectors with the compression fittings that do not leak like the plastic ones do. That seems like a better alternative. If you had a situation where the EAS was in fault mode and dropped to the bump stops, you could use the manual inflation valves and pump the bags up at a gas station or even try a bicycle pump to get the corners to drive height. Assuming it was not a bag issue of course. It is tough to get the height setting correct so a good pressure gauge and then eyeball the height at the corners would suffice and get you going again.
 

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Are you asking for installation instructions or use instructions? Like mentioned above, you tee in the schrader valve to each bag line. In use, I didn't find a pressure gauge to be useful. I just keep a measuring tape in my compressor bag and measure from the center of the wheel to the fender lip. I do occasionally find a branch fitting leaking a little, but its a quick fix and worth the piece of mind. I also have a permanently mounted pressure gauge for the reservoir line which is useful to diagnose any issues that come up.
 

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Search a post from a few weeks ago 'going back to EAS'.

The emergency kit should be seen as just that: a way to get you home if your EAS fails. It's very difficult, if not impossible, to get the ride height right by eye and with a bike pump; the suspension action is heating the air in the springs and expanding it. This gives you very different ride heights after a while driving. Also service station air pumps, at least in Australia just don't have enough pressure to fill the bags; you need a foot type bike tyre pump. 65 - 75 psi for each air spring is about right from memory.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks, all for the replies.

guess i'll be throwing a bike pump in the back of the Rover, just in case. ha! never thought that would be an emergency part i needed to carry.
 

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I never kept a bike pump on board. My small compressor at home worked fine and full garages that had real air pumps worked fine. I never tried one of those machines you put quarters in but they barely work on tires so they might not work on the air bags. Just keep up with the issues and you won't get stranded on the bump stops. If you off road a lot and have an ARB or powertank, those work fine too.
 

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I carry a small 12V lighter socket compressor. I carry it to adjust my trailer tire pressures anyway. Its slow but does the job. I don't see why a bike pump wouldn't work, you can certainly get enough pressure with one. But it would try your patience for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I carry a small 12V lighter socket compressor. I carry it to adjust my trailer tire pressures anyway. Its slow but does the job. I don't see why a bike pump wouldn't work, you can certainly get enough pressure with one. But it would try your patience for sure.
that's a good point. i'll ditch the bike pump for an inexpensive cigarette lighter compressor.

thanks again,
 
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