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Discussion Starter #1
I recently lost a friend to a rollover car crash and about 15 years ago lost a grandma to a rollover crash in a P38. I wanted to make sure that they fixed the pillars in the L322 (2010 specifically) so that they are stronger and more durable in case something were to happen where I flipped. Does anyone who if the roofs are still collapsing? Thanks!


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Not to sound insensitive but there never was anything to fix. The forces involved in a road speed roll over crash that is fast enough to cause crushing simply can not be engineered out in a rig so heavy. It is in no way and issue to single out Range Rovers for.

The L322s do have a stronger passenger cell than P38s which is basic to the unibody design and engineering advances. The chances of a roll over accident are so rare there is no reason for there to be more rigid safety standards. Safety regulations are for perimeter impact, the type involved in most accidents. To put it in perspective only 2-3% of accidents involve a vehicle roll over. Almost all of those are caused by speeds too fast for the conditions. You can browse the NHTSA for further stats.

If you truly are concerned about roll over accidents in your personal vehicles then you will need to invest in a full roll over cage for your passenger compartment. However you need to keep in mind that roll over protection has limitations dependent on the conditions behind a rollover and how intrusive the cage is in it's design.

ADDITION: Revised roof-crush rules. The newest (2009) rule says that vehicles weighing 6,000 pounds or less must be able to withstand a force equal to three times their weight applied alternately to the left and right sides of the roof. The roof cannot bend so far that it would touch the head of a median-height-male test dummy.While the heaviest passenger vehicles, those weighing between 6,000 and 10,000 pounds, used to be exempt, they are now covered by the standard. However, those heavier vehicles need only withstand 1.5 times their own weight on the roof.
 

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I have had a very bad experience in my p38 rolled over with 5 people in the car the car rolled 3 times hitting 2 different mountains and everybody walked out of the car with noting but minor cuts from the glass I don't think the p38 was ever weak and I know the l322 is way stronger no need to worry about roof collapsing


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Discussion Starter #6
Not to sound insensitive but there never was anything to fix. The forces involved in a road speed roll over crash that is fast enough to cause crushing simply can not be engineered out in a rig so heavy. It is in no way and issue to single out Range Rovers for.

The L322s do have a stronger passenger cell than P38s which is basic to the unibody design and engineering advances. The chances of a roll over accident are so rare there is no reason for there to be more rigid safety standards. Safety regulations are for perimeter impact, the type involved in most accidents. To put it in perspective only 2-3% of accidents involve a vehicle roll over. Almost all of those are caused by speeds too fast for the conditions. You can browse the NHTSA for further stats.

If you truly are concerned about roll over accidents in your personal vehicles then you will need to invest in a full roll over cage for your passenger compartment. However you need to keep in mind that roll over protection has limitations dependent on the conditions behind a rollover and how intrusive the cage is in it's design.

ADDITION: Revised roof-crush rules. The newest (2009) rule says that vehicles weighing 6,000 pounds or less must be able to withstand a force equal to three times their weight applied alternately to the left and right sides of the roof. The roof cannot bend so far that it would touch the head of a median-height-male test dummy.While the heaviest passenger vehicles, those weighing between 6,000 and 10,000 pounds, used to be exempt, they are now covered by the standard. However, those heavier vehicles need only withstand 1.5 times their own weight on the roof.
Good to know, although your data is a bit off. "Annually, rollover crashes account for approximately 30 percent of passenger vehicle occupant fatalities..."


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Discussion Starter #7



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That is crazy, glad you're all ok! Thanks for the information.


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Good to know, although your data is a bit off. "Annually, rollover crashes account for approximately 30 percent of passenger vehicle occupant fatalities..."
Uhm, your reading comprehension seems to be a bit lacking. I gave no stats on fatalities. Only the percentage of total crashes that involve a roll over. Two very different topics.
 

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RHB, similar look when a P38 rolled of the hillside track we were on. Only difference is that his hatch popped open and was then ripped off. We winched the poor rig back up the hill and got her started and he drove her home with only a few scabby glass nics and a bruised shoulder to show. I've seen some pretty banged up and destroyed P38s over the years and find it amazing how well they hold up.
 
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